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14.0 Course Descriptions 2017/2018

14.0.1 Course Selection Notes

  1. Not all courses listed are offered every year; some are offered every second or third year. For information about course availability, students should consult the department offering the course. The Concordia Timetable is the official list of courses offered in a given academic year and is available online.
  2. First-year students may not register in senior-level courses except with the consent of the department.
  3. Enrolment in some courses may be limited to students in particular programs, or restricted for other academic reasons.
  4. Students working toward a Concordia Arts or Science degree may not count more than 18 credits from courses outside the Faculties of Arts and Science toward their degrees. Courses offered through the Faculty of Education and the Faculty of Management are outside the Faculties of Arts and Science. Faculty information is indicated for each course. For complete information, students should consult the General Academic Requirements for their program.

14.0.2 Course Information

Course sections are listed alphabetically by discipline. Within the sections for the different disciplines, courses are listed in alphanumerical order by course code. Each course listing contains the course’s code, title, credit value, instruction hours, description of the course content and, if applicable, notes, prerequisites, and corequisites.

Course codes are alpha-numeric. The alphabetical code indicates the discipline of study (e.g., BIO for Biology, ENG for English, PSY for Psychology, etc.); the three-digit numerical code is interpreted as follows:

100–199 junior-level courses, normally taken by first-year students.
200–399 senior-level courses open to students with at least second-year standing (18 credits or more).
400–499 senior-level courses for students completing Concordia degrees, normally taken in the third or fourth year of undergraduate studies.
500–599 master’s degree courses and senior-level courses open only to students admitted to an after-degree program.
600–699 master’s degree courses and senior-level courses open only to students with an applicable degree and other required qualifications.

Credit Value

The credit value indicates the weight of the course used fo rcalculating the Grade Point Average and for meeting degree requirements. Normally, 1.5- and 3-credit courses are completed at the end of one semester and 6-credit courses at the end of the academic year (two semesters).

Instruction Hours

The numbers within the parentheses indicate the hours of instruction in a week required by that course:

  • The first number indicates lecture hours.
  • The second number indicates seminar hours (s), or lecture-lab (L).
  • The third number indicates laboratory hours.
  • The fourth number, if present, indicates online hours.
  • The presence of a forward slash (/) indicates that the lab or seminar does not meet weekly. For example, 3/2 indicates 3 hours held every 2 weeks.

For example, 6 (3-1s-3) indicates a 6-credit course with 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of seminar, and 3 hours of lab per week for the full two semesters.

Prerequisites

Prerequisites are courses that students must have successfully completed before registering in the course. See section 4.2.2 of this Calendar.

Corequisites

Corequisites are courses in which students must register during the same term of study; corequisites may have been successfully completed previous to registration in the course. See section 4.2.2 of this Calendar.

14.1 Course Descriptions by Discipline

Accounting

ACCT101 - Introductory Financial Accounting - 3 (4-1s-0)
Faculty of Management

Postulates, principles, the accounting cycle, capital and income measurement, financial statement preparation and analysis, emphasis on reporting to shareholders, creditors, and other external decision-makers.

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) or (Math 30-2 or equivalent) or (Applied Mathematics 30 or equivalent)

Corequisites: ECO 101 (Introduction to Microeconomics)

Further information: Course availability and times

ACCT102 - Introductory Management Accounting - 3 (4-1s-0)
Faculty of Management

Managerial accounting systems with an emphasis on information needed by management to properly plan and control business operations. Corporate planning and control concepts, strategic planning, pricing, budgeting, and relevant costs for decision-making purposes are reviewed.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ACCT102 (Introductory Management Accounting) or ACCT322

Prerequisites: ACCT101 (Introductory Financial Accounting)

Further information: Course availability and times

ACCT301 - Intermediate Financial Accounting I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

Builds upon the financial accounting framework that was developed in ACCT101. It extends the student's understanding of generally accepted accounting principles through an in-depth review and examination of various assets on the balance sheet and revenue and expense issues. Students acquire an awareness of the underlying rationale of existing accounting alternatives as well as an appreciation of the characteristics and limitations of accounting.

Prerequisites: ACCT101 (Introductory Financial Accounting) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ACCT303 - Intermediate Management Accounting - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

Extends the basic cost concepts, procedures, and systems covered in ACCT102 and introduces additional managerial accounting tools. The mastery of techniques for implementation and evaluation of cost systems for management and decision making is emphasized.

Prerequisites: ACCT102 (Introductory Management Accounting) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ACCT401 - Income Taxation - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

An overview of the income taxation system in Canada (including the Goods and Services Tax). Introduces students to the skills required to locate and interpret provisions of the Income Tax Act and to assess the implications for decision-makers.

Prerequisites: ACCT301 (Intermediate Financial Accounting I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ACCT402 - Auditing Theory and Application - 3 (3-1s-0)
Faculty of Management

An examination of the framework of auditing and the context within which an audit (including related procedures) is conducted.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ACCT402 (Auditing Theory and Application) or ISAM549 (Auditing Theory and Application)

Prerequisites: ACCT301 (Intermediate Financial Accounting I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ACCT403 - Accounting Information Systems - 3 (0-0-3)
Faculty of Management

A comprehensive introduction to accounting information systems in today's business environment and the impact that these systems have on organizations and the accounting profession. Topics include hardware and software of computer systems, basic transaction processing, file and database concepts, systems theory, systems documentation tools, internal controls, security, artificial intelligence and auditing. The system development life cycle approach, including systems analysis, design and operational concepts will also be covered.

Prerequisites: ACCT301 (Intermediate Financial Accounting I) and BUS 250 (Management Information Systems) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ACCT404 - Intermediate Financial Accounting II - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

This course builds upon the financial accounting framework developed in ACCT101 and ACCT301. The course provides an in-depth review and examination of liabilities and shareholders' equity on the balance sheet, as well as, examining areas of a more specialized nature, including earnings per share, accounting for corporate income taxes, leases, pensions, changes in accounting policies, correction of accounting errors, and the Statement of Cash Flow. Students acquire an awareness of the underlying rationale of existing accounting alternatives as well as an appreciation of the characteristics and limitations of accounting.

Prerequisites: ACCT301 (Intermediate Financial Accounting I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ACCT405 - Advanced Management Accounting - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

The course expands upon the concepts and techniques taught in the first- and second-level management accounting courses and practice applying those concepts and techniques in real-life case situations. The cases will offer an opportunity for students to define problems and apply management accounting knowledge. Topics include responsibility accounting, performance management and strategy analysis control system design (including governance and audit).

Prerequisites: ACCT102 (Introductory Management Accounting) and ACCT303 (Intermediate Management Accounting) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ACCT406 - Advanced Financial Accounting - 3 (3-1s-0)
Faculty of Management

This course analyzes the concepts and practices underlying financial reporting in more complex areas such as business combinations, multinational operations, joint ventures and not-for-profit organizations. The translation of foreign currency transactions and the translation of foreign currency financial statements are also covered.

Prerequisites: ACCT404 (Intermediate Financial Accounting II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Arabic

ARAB 101 - Arabic Language for Beginners I - 3 (4-0-1)
Faculty of Arts

This course is an introduction to pronunciation, reading, writing, and conversation.

Note: Not to be taken by students with native or near native proficiency, or Arabic 35 or its equivalents in Canada and other countries. Students who can read/write fairly MSA and have a fair knowledge of grammar are encouraged to consult with the department first.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ARAB 101 (Arabic Language for Beginners I) or (30-level Arabic or equivalent)

Further information: Course availability and times

ARAB 102 - Arabic Language for Beginners II - 3 (4-0-1)
Faculty of Arts

This course is a continuation of the Arabic Language for Beginners I. It also includes pronunciation, reading, writing, and conversation.

Note: Students who can read/write fairly MSA and have a fair knowledge of grammar are encouraged to consult with the department first.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ARAB 102 (Arabic Language for Beginners II) or (30-level Arabic or equivalent)

Prerequisites: ARAB 101

Further information: Course availability and times

Art History

ARTH101 - Survey of Western Art I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of Western Art to the end of the Middle Ages.

Further information: Course availability and times

ARTH102 - Survey of Western Art II - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of Western Art from the beginning of the Renaissance to the present day.

Further information: Course availability and times

Biblical and Christian Studies

BCS 500 - Principles and Methodology in Biblical and Christian Studies - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course questions the nature of theological investigation, exploring different methodologies in the process of answering theological questions. Particular attention will be paid to the implications of the resultant methodologies for faith, reason, practice, and tradition.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 502 - Intermediate Hebrew Grammar and Readings - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Development of Hebrew grammar, vocabulary and reading beyond the introductory level to the intermediate level in the five major genres of Hebrew literature: Historical, Legal, Prophetic, Wisdom and Psalms.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Prerequisites: HEBR101 (Biblical Hebrew I) and HEBR102 (Biblical Hebrew II) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 511 - Religion and Pop Culture - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Interdisciplinary critical analysis of religious ideas and imagery presented in pop culture, including the media of television, comedy, sports, consumerism, advertising, film, fashion, literature, comic books, technology, music, and internet.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 511 (Religion and Pop Culture) or REL 311 (Religion and Pop Culture)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 520 - Special Topics in the Pentateuch - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An in-depth study of special themes or topics in the first five books of the Hebrew Scriptures, with special reference to exegesis and history.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 520 (Special Topics in the Pentateuch) or BCS 513 or REL 320 (The Pentateuch)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 521 - The Historical Literature of the Old Testament - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Critical study of the Historical Literature of the Old Testament in terms of historiography, content and correlations with archaeology and comparative literature in the ancient Near East, as well as the content and theology of Joshua, Judges, Ruth, Samuel, Kings, Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah and Esther.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 521 (The Historical Literature of the Old Testament) or REL 321 (The Historical Literature of the Old Testament)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 530 - Readings in the Greek New Testament - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A rapid reading of major portions of the Greek New Testament, with special emphasis on problems of text, language, and grammar. Some readings from Greek literature contemporary with the New Testament may also be featured.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Prerequisites: GRK 101 (Introductory Classical Greek I) and GRK 102 (Introductory Classical Greek II) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 535 - Johannine Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course examines the Gospel of John, three Johannine letters, and the book of Revelation both against the background of the first century Jewish-Hellenistic history and their theological relevance in our time.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 535 (Johannine Literature) or REL 365 (Johannine Literature)

Prerequisites: GRK 101 (Introductory Classical Greek I) and GRK 102 (Introductory Classical Greek II) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 538 - The Dead Sea Scrolls - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the documents found at Qumran and their value in reconstructing the faith and practice of a religious community within the context of Second Temple Judaism and early Christianity.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 538 (The Dead Sea Scrolls) or REL 338 (The Dead Sea Scrolls)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 540 - The Rise of Western Christendom - 3 (2-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Often referred to as the "Dark Ages", the period from c. 400 to c. 1000 was the period in which the Roman world was transformed into its three "heirs" that have defined the history of the West ever since: the Byzantine Empire (Eastern Europe), Western Christendom, and Islamic civilizations. This course will evaluate the transformation of late antiquity and the rise of Western Christendom in the early Middle Ages, focusing especially on the relationship between the Christian church and society.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 540 (The Rise of Western Christendom) or HIS 340 (Light on Europe in the "Dark Ages") or REL 340 (The Rise of Western Christendom)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 545 - The Early Church Fathers - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course studies the theology, worship and ethics of mainstream Christianity as evidenced by influential writers of the second and third centuries (the "Apostolic Fathers") against the backdrop of alternative Christianities and the larger Roman society.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 545 (The Early Church Fathers) or REL 342 (Christianity in the Second and Third Centuries)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 551 - History of Christianity in Canada - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An in-depth study of the history of Christianity in Canada from its earliest beginnings to the present. The course will include an analysis of major trends and themes.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 551 (History of Christianity in Canada) or REL 351 (The History of Christianity in Canada)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 559 - Theology of Martin Luther - 3 (2-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A critical study of Luther, his theology, and impact on the Reformation.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 559 (Theology of Martin Luther) or REL 359 (Theology of Luther) or HIS 309 (Luther and the Reformation)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 564 - Topics in the Gospel of Matthew - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An in-depth analysis of specific topics in Matthew's Gospel.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 564 (Topics in the Gospel of Matthew) or BCS 537 and REL 364 (The Gospel of Matthew)

Prerequisites: GRK 101 (Introductory Classical Greek I) and GRK 102 (Introductory Classical Greek II) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 567 - Topics in Pauline Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An in-depth analysis of one or more of Paul's epistles.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 567 (Topics in Pauline Literature) or BCS 534 and REL 367 (Studies in the Pauline Literature)

Prerequisites: GRK 101 (Introductory Classical Greek I) and GRK 102 (Introductory Classical Greek II) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 570 - The Eastern Church - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This couse is an in-depth study of the history, theology, and traditions of Eastern (i.e., Greek/Slavic) Orthodox Christianity.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 570 (The Eastern Church) or REL 370 (The Eastern Church)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 576 - The Lutheran Confessions - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An in-depth theological study of the Book of Concord within its historical context in the light of current scholarly discussion of the era of confessionalization and the issues treated in the Book of Concord. Attention will be paid to the theological method and the historical shaping of the issues in the dispute in the Lutheran reformation. A working knowledge of Latin and German is desirable.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 576 (The Lutheran Confessions) or REL 376 (The Lutheran Confessions)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 583 - Jewish-Christian Relations in Antiquity - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course will examine historically and religiously the symbiotic relationship between Jews and Christians from their origins. The course will also critically re-examine the current Jewish-Christian scholarship on the issue of the "Parting of the Ways" (i.e. separation between the two parties) by focusing on the complex and intricate relationship between Jews and Christians in antiquity, particularly with a focus on the Roman world.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 583 (Jewish-Christian Relations in Antiquity) or REL 383 (Jewish-Christian Relations in Antiquity)

Prerequisites: REL 101 (Western Religious Traditions) or REL 150 (Introduction to the Christian Faith) or REL 253 (New Testament Literature)

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 585 - Orthodoxy and Heresy in Early Christianity - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The primary purpose of the class will be to explore the variety of non-canonical (i.e. apocryphal) texts which were developed and widely read in the first several centuries of the Christian era. Examination of these NT apocryphal writings will show diversity in early Christianity in the form of either Christian "orthodoxy" or "heresy." Heresy historically has been a constant companion of orthodox Christianity and functioned like a pumice on Christianity in the sense that the primary faith contents of Christianity were refined as the early Christians struggled with the challenges posed by the heretics to define the Christian rule of faith with clarity and preserve its wholesomeness To examine this, the course will examine the various strands of Christianity and the key issues of debate among them by looking into diversity in early Christian thought and practice by investigating both "orthodoxical" and "heterodoxical" expressions contained in NT apocryphal writings.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 585 (Orthodoxy and Heresy in Early Christianity) or REL 385 (Orthodoxy and Heresy in Early Christianity)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 590 - Philosophy of Religion - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course analyses various perspectives on the relationship between faith (Christian faith in particular) and reason. It includes examinations of various traditional attempts to use reason as a foundation for, or in support of, faith, attempts to use reason to argue against faith, as well as perspectives according to which all attempts are ill-conceived. Put otherwise, it examines views according to which faith and reason are in agreement, views according to which they conflict with one another, and views according to which neither is the case.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 590 (Philosophy of Religion) or PHIL290 (Philosophy of Religion) or PHIL490 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Religion) or REL 290 (Faith and Reason)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 616 - Old Testament Seminar: Themes in the Book of Isaiah - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

An in-depth analysis of key themes in the Book of the Prophet Isaiah.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 616 (Old Testament Seminar: Themes in the Book of Isaiah) or BCS 516

Prerequisites: HEBR101 (Biblical Hebrew I) and HEBR102 (Biblical Hebrew II) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 617 - Old Testament Seminar: Hebrew Exegesis of Qoheleth - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Exegesis of the Hebrew text of Qoheleth 'Ecclesiastes' in terms of grammar, linguistics, genre, literary style, and content for the purpose of discussing the theological implications of the text.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 617 (Old Testament Seminar: Hebrew Exegesis of Qoheleth) or BCS 503

Prerequisites: BCS 502 (Intermediate Hebrew Grammar and Readings) or (HEBR101 (Biblical Hebrew I) and HEBR102 (Biblical Hebrew II))

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 625 - Church History and Theology Seminar:Philosophical Theology from the Patristic Era to the Reformation - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This is part of the "Church History and Theology Seminar: Special Topics" series. In-depth study of key figures in historical theology, focusing on the use of philosophical concepts and methods of argumentation in the defence and development of Christian doctrine. Primary source readings from both eastern and western church fathers may include material from Origen, St. Athanasius, St. Gregory of Nyssa, St. Augustine, etc. Mediaeval figures may include St. Anselm, St. Bonaventure, St. Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus. Reformation era may include works from Cajetan, Melanchthon, Calvin.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 632 - New Testament Seminar: Studies in Luke - Acts - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Major literary, theological, and socio-cultural themes in Luke's double work, including such topics as the sharing of possessions, the role of women in Jesus' ministry and the early church, characterization and plot development, Luke's view of salvation history and attitudes towards the Jewish people and Judaism.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 632 (New Testament Seminar: Studies in Luke - Acts) or BCS 532

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 636 - New Testament Seminar: The Historical Jesus - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

The course will examine the various quests for the historical Jesus from Reimarus to the present day. It will evaluate the various methodologies used with a view to arriving at a better understanding of the historical Jesus.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 642 - Church History and Theology Seminar: Topics in Medieval Church History - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Readings in primary sources and secondary scholarly interpretations focused on a selected theme prominent in the history of Western Christendom during the "long" Middle Ages (c. 400 to 1550), tracing origins in Late Antiquity to challenge and transformation in the sixteenth-century Reformation. Topics that may be offered include: The Cult of the Saints, Relics, and Pilgrimage; Spiritual and Temporal Authority; Universities and Cloisters: Scholastics and Monastic Theology.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 642 (Church History and Theology Seminar: Topics in Medieval Church History) or BCS 542

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 643 - Church History and Theology Seminar: The Reformation - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Historical and theological overview of the changes in the history of Western Christendom, especially during the sixteenth century Reformation period. Topics that may be covered include: Precursors to the sixteenth century Reformation; the Lutheran, Zwinglian, and Calvinist Reformations; the English Reformation; the Radical Reformation; the Counter Reformation.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 643 (Church History and Theology Seminar: The Reformation) or BCS 543

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BCS 644 - Church History and Theology Seminar: Faith and Philosophy - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This seminar discusses the task of understanding God from philosophical and theological perspectives. Questions will address epistemological issues regarding God, language as it relates to God, and the relationship between philosophical arguments for God relative to faith in God.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Arts in Biblical and Christian Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BCS 644 (Church History and Theology Seminar: Faith and Philosophy) or BCS 544

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

Biochemistry

BIOCH200 - Introductory Biochemistry - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to the fundamental principles of biochemistry. Protein structure and function; lipids and the structure of biological membranes, nucleotides and the structure of nucleic acids; bioenergetics and the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and nitrogen; the integration and regulation of cellular metabolism. Designed for students who require a one-term introduction to the fundamental principles of biochemistry and for students who intend to take further courses in biochemistry.

Note: CH 263 is recommended as a corequisite.

Prerequisites: CH 101 (Introductory University Chemistry I) and CH 261 (Basic Organic Chemistry I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIOCH310 - Bioenergetics and Metabolism - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Focuses on the transformation of energy in living systems and the accompanying biophysical and biochemical processes and activities.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIOCH310 (Bioenergetics and Metabolism) or BIO 310 (Bioenergetics and Metabolism)

Prerequisites: BIOCH200 (Introductory Biochemistry) and CH 101 (Introductory University Chemistry I) and CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) and CH 261 (Basic Organic Chemistry I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIOCH320 - Biological Structure and Catalysis - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

A comprehensive introduction to the biochemistry of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Topics include the role of enzymes in biological processes, biological membranes, transport, and biosignalling.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIOCH320 (Biological Structure and Catalysis) or BIO 320 (Biological Structure and Catalysis)

Prerequisites: BIOCH200 (Introductory Biochemistry) and CH 101 (Introductory University Chemistry I) and CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) and CH 261 (Basic Organic Chemistry I) and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIOCH340 - Nucleic Acids - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

A comprehensive introduction to the biochemistry of nucleic acids. Topics include the structure and function of DNA and RNA, nucleic acid metabolism and the control of gene expression.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIOCH340 (Nucleic Acids) or BIO 340 (Nucleic Acids)

Prerequisites: BIOCH200 (Introductory Biochemistry) and CH 101 (Introductory University Chemistry I) and CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIOCH343 - Cellular Communication and Symbiosis - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Communication between cells. Topics include mechanisms of communication in immunology, neurophysiology, reproduction biology and symbiosis. Both vertebrate and invertebrate systems are discussed.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIOCH343 (Cellular Communication and Symbiosis) or BIO 343 (Cellular Communication and Symbiosis)

Prerequisites: BIO 201 (Cellular Biology) and BIOCH200 (Introductory Biochemistry) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIOCH350 - Laboratory Methods in Biochemistry - 3 (1-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Intended for students enrolled in a Biochemistry Minor.

Prerequisites: BES 107 (Introduction to Cell Biology) and BIOCH200 (Introductory Biochemistry) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Biology

BIO 100 - Introduction to Biological Systems - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

A general biology course covering current topics in biology, including cellular reproduction and genetics, biological diversity, animal and plant form and function, and communities and ecosystems.

Note: This course is not accepted for credit toward a Biology or Environmental Science major, concentration, or minor.

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 160 - Human Anatomy - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

This course introduces the normal structure and function of the human body. Emphasis will be placed on, but not limited to, the hierarchy of structural organization, medical terminology, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems as well as system relationships.

Prerequisites: (Biology 30 or equivalent) or (Science 30 or equivalent) or BIO 100 (Introduction to Biological Systems)

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 201 - Cellular Biology - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

The ultrastructure and metabolism of cells. Plasma membrane structure and function; cytoskeleton involvement in intracellular transport, mitosis, and cytokinesis; the endomembrane system, protein targeting, exocytosis and endocytosis; nuclear structure and function; cell cycle control and cancer.

Prerequisites: BES 107 (Introduction to Cell Biology) and Chemistry (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 207 - Molecular Genetics and Heredity - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

The chromosomal and molecular basis for the transmission and function of genes. The construction of genetic and physical maps of genes and genomes. Strategies for the isolation of specific genes. Examples of regulatory mechanisms for the expression of the genetic material in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

Prerequisites: BES 107 (Introduction to Cell Biology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 208 - Principles of Ecology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

A comprehensive survey of general ecology concepts that can stand alone or serve as preparation for advanced ecology courses. Labs emphasize the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from ecological experiments and field studies to illustrate and complement the lecture material.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 208 (Principles of Ecology) or BES 208 or ENSC208 (Principles of Ecology)

Prerequisites: BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 211 - Flora and Fauna of Alberta - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

The identification, distribution, habits, and life histories of the aquatic and terrestrial macro flora and fauna of Alberta. Factors affecting local variation are discussed. Collection methods, estimation of population size, and identifying the age of organisms are among the topics covered in the labs.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 211 (Flora and Fauna of Alberta) or BES 210 or ENSC210 (Flora and Fauna of Alberta)

Prerequisites: BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 215 - Behavioural Ecology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Animal behaviour from an ecological and physiological perspective.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 215 (Behavioural Ecology) or BES 215 or ENSC215 (Behavioural Ecology)

Prerequisites: BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 220 - Soil Science - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

The formation, classification, composition, and conservation of soils with an emphasis on the soils of Alberta. Chemical and physical properties affecting plant growth and nutrition are studied.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 220 (Soil Science) or BES 220 or ENSC220 (Soil Science)

Prerequisites: BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 225 - Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Comparative anatomy of the vertebrates with special emphasis on mammals, including humans.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 225 (Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates) or ENSC225 (Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates)

Prerequisites: BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 227 - Science Communication - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

This course covers all aspects of science communication, including communication with peers, the public, the media, industry and government. Emphasis is placed on experimental data design, data analysis, interpretation and presentation. Students will gain practical experience in processing and presenting results of research. Oral presentation skills will allow students to develop their communication skills, and examination of published research will help the students develop their laboratory report writing skills in the sciences.

Note: This course is only open to Science students (in a science major, concentration or minor).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 227 (Science Communication) or BES 227 or ENSC227 (Science Communication)

Prerequisites: Biochemistry (3) or Biology (3) or Biology/Environmental Science (3) or Chemistry (3) or Computing Science (3) or Earth Science (3) or Environmental Science (3) or Information Science (3) or Information Technology (3) or Mathematics (3) or Physics (3) and 2nd year standing required or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: 3 credits of Science and 2nd year standing required

BIO 243 - Animal Physiology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Functional biology at the organ-system level. Emphasis on vertebrate physiology, including humans.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 243 (Animal Physiology) or ENSC243 (Animal Physiology)

Prerequisites: BES 107 (Introduction to Cell Biology) and Chemistry (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 245 - Plant Physiology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

An introductory course on water and energy relations in vascular plants, evapotranspiration, mineral nutrition, membrane transport, ascent of water, translocation, net carbon assimilation, growth, development, hormone action, and water stress.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 245 (Plant Physiology) or ENSC245 (Plant Physiology)

Prerequisites: BES 107 (Introduction to Cell Biology) and Chemistry (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 250 - Survey of the Invertebrates - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

A lecture and laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with the major invertebrate taxa. Emphasizes functional anatomy and life cycles.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 250 (Survey of the Invertebrates) or BES 250 or ENSC250 (Survey of the Invertebrates)

Prerequisites: BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 265 - General Microbiology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Physiology, metabolism, and replication of bacteria and eukaryotic microorganisms. Gene regulation in bacteria. Ecology and interrelationships of microorganisms; biotechnology and industrial microbiology. Laboratories focus on the identification of microorganisms using biochemical and molecular biological criteria.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 265 (General Microbiology) or ENSC265 (General Microbiology)

Prerequisites: BES 107 (Introduction to Cell Biology) and BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Corequisites: BIOCH200 (Introductory Biochemistry) or BIO 207 (Molecular Genetics and Heredity)

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 302 - Developmental Biology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

The growth and differentiation of organisms, gametogenesis, fertilization, embryogenesis, morphogenesis, embryonic induction, regeneration, aging, and cell death.

Note: BIO 201 is recommended as a prerequisite.

Prerequisites: BES 107 (Introduction to Cell Biology) and BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and Chemistry (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 304 - Aquatic Biology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to the structure and functioning of freshwater ecosystems with emphasis on the biological, chemical and physical processes that affect organismal distribution, abundance, life cycles, adaptations, and the ecological roles that organisms have in aquatic ecosystems. Environmental problems resulting from human disturbances to aquatic ecosystems are examined. The lab portion of this course provides students with hands-on experience in sampling, analyzing and interpreting features of lake, wetland and stream ecosystems.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 304 (Aquatic Biology) or BES 304 or ENSC305 (Aquatic Biology)

Prerequisites: BES 208 or BIO 208 (Principles of Ecology) or ENSC208 (Principles of Ecology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 307 - Advanced Molecular Genetics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Molecular genetics of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Topics include aspects of gene regulation, analysis of the features and nature of genomes, genes, and chromosomes. The second half of the course will focus on aspects of human genetic diseases, namely the development, diagnosis and treatment of such disorders.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 307 (Advanced Molecular Genetics) or BIO 377 or BIO 420

Prerequisites: BIO 207 (Molecular Genetics and Heredity) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 308 - Population and Community Ecology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Principles of population and community ecology as they apply to plants and animals; population consequences of variation among individuals; habitat structure and population structure; habitat selection and foraging theory; life tables, demography, and the evolution of life history patterns; population dynamics and population regulation; ecological succession; classification and ordination of communities; application of molecular biology to the study of populations, mating systems and forensics.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 308 (Population and Community Ecology) or BES 308 or ENSC308 (Population and Community Ecology)

Prerequisites: BES 208 or BIO 208 (Principles of Ecology) or ENSC208 (Principles of Ecology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 310 - Bioenergetics and Metabolism - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Focuses on the transformation of energy in living systems and the accompanying biophysical and biochemical processes and activities.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 310 (Bioenergetics and Metabolism) or BIOCH310 (Bioenergetics and Metabolism)

Prerequisites: BIOCH200 (Introductory Biochemistry) and CH 101 (Introductory University Chemistry I) and CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) and CH 261 (Basic Organic Chemistry I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 318 - Field Ecology in Alberta - 3 (0-1s-5)
Faculty of Science

This is a field course designed to be taken during the summer following either the second or third year of studies. Field investigations provide the student with experience analyzing the features of various terrestrial and aquatic habitats throughout Alberta, and allow them to evaluate the potential effects of human activity in those environments.

Note: In addition to the regular tuition and lab fees, there is a special fee to cover transportation, accommodation, and shared meals.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 318 (Field Ecology in Alberta) or ENSC318 (Field Ecology in Alberta)

Prerequisites: BES 208 or BIO 208 (Principles of Ecology) or ENSC208 (Principles of Ecology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 319 - Field Course in Marine, Freshwater and Terrestrial Ecosystems - 3 (0-1s-5)
Faculty of Science

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop practical skills in environmental monitoring, assessment, and management practices as they apply to global environmental issues. Projects focus on environmental quality, impact assessment, habitat structure, biodiversity and sustainability. This course is designed to be taken during the year (summer or Christmas break) following the second or third year of studies. Field exercises are conducted at an area outside of Alberta, with the destination to be decided each year.

Note: The destination will be announced before the beginning of Fall semester, and interested students should apply to the Department Chair. Tuition and all fees (normally non-refundable) must be paid one month before departing on the course, including an additional fee charged to cover the costs of transportation, accommodation and other course-related activities. This fee will depend on the destination, since the course will be run only on a cost-recovery basis.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 319 (Field Course in Marine, Freshwater and Terrestrial Ecosystems) or ENSC319 (Field Course in Marine, Freshwater and Terrestrial Ecosystems)

Prerequisites: BES 208 or BIO 208 (Principles of Ecology) or ENSC208 (Principles of Ecology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 320 - Biological Structure and Catalysis - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

A comprehensive introduction to the biochemistry of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Topics include the role of enzymes in biological processes, biological membranes, transport, and biosignalling.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 320 (Biological Structure and Catalysis) or BIOCH320 (Biological Structure and Catalysis)

Prerequisites: BIOCH200 (Introductory Biochemistry) and CH 101 (Introductory University Chemistry I) and CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) and CH 261 (Basic Organic Chemistry I) and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 330 - Work Experience - 3 (0-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Senior Biology students may receive credit for practical experience obtained outside the classroom in the work environment. Students who are considering taking this course must first apply to the Department Chair for permission to have previous work experience evaluated for credit.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 330 (Work Experience) or ENSC335 (Work Experience)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 339 - Conservation Biology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to the principles and methods of conservation biology that focuses on the global and regional patterns of biological diversity, ecological processes underlying those patterns, threats to global biological diversity, and solutions to dealing with those threats.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 339 (Conservation Biology) or BES 339 or ENSC339 (Conservation Biology)

Prerequisites: BES 208 or BIO 208 (Principles of Ecology) or ENSC208 (Principles of Ecology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 340 - Nucleic Acids - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

A comprehensive introduction to the biochemistry of nucleic acids. Topics include the structure and function of DNA and RNA, nucleic acid metabolism and the control of gene expression.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 340 (Nucleic Acids) or BIOCH340 (Nucleic Acids)

Prerequisites: BIOCH200 (Introductory Biochemistry) and CH 101 (Introductory University Chemistry I) and CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 343 - Cellular Communication and Symbiosis - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Communication between cells. Topics include mechanisms of communication in immunology, neurophysiology, reproduction biology and symbiosis. Both vertebrate and invertebrate systems are discussed.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 343 (Cellular Communication and Symbiosis) or BIOCH343 (Cellular Communication and Symbiosis)

Prerequisites: BIOCH200 (Introductory Biochemistry) and BIO 201 (Cellular Biology) and Biology (6SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 346 - Environmental Physiology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

The understanding of the effect of environmental variables (both natural and anthropogenic) on the functioning of a variety of organisms.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 346 (Environmental Physiology) or ENSC346 (Environmental Physiology)

Prerequisites: BIO 243 (Animal Physiology) or ENSC243 (Animal Physiology) or BIO 245 (Plant Physiology) or ENSC245 (Plant Physiology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 350 - Parasitology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Parasitology is the scientific study of the biological relationship known as parasitism. This course is a survey of parasites of human and animals, using selected taxa to illustrate the parasite/host adaptation with respect to their morphology, physiology, behaviour, life history, and ecology. Based on this basic knowledge, discussion will focus on the occurrence, symptomatology, pathogenesis, epidemiology and control of representative parasitic diseases of human and animals. Laboratories will provide opportunities for students to study specimen and samples of important taxa of parasites, as well as to conduct experiments to explore parasitic relationships and life histories.

Prerequisites: Biology/Environmental Science (3SR) or Biology (3SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 352 - Toxicology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Basic concepts of toxicology and the ways in which they apply to selected plant and animal systems. Laboratories focus on specific examples of bioassays, standard methods of data collection, analysis, and interpretation.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 352 (Toxicology) or ENSC350 (Environmental Toxicology) or ENVH557 (Environmental Toxicology)

Prerequisites: (Biology (3SR) or Environmental Science (3SR) ) and Chemistry (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 355 - Virology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

General concepts of viral structure and replication. DNA, RNA and retroviruses and their life cycles with detailed examples of specific viruses. Bacterial, plant, and other non-animal viruses and their role in the ecosystem. Molecular genetics of viruses and their role in evolution. Elements of viral epidemiology and pathogenesis.

Prerequisites: BIO 265 (General Microbiology) or ENSC265 (General Microbiology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 366 - Molecular Biology and Biotechnology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Introduction to the theory and practice of common techniques of biotechnology and genetic engineering. Current applications of molecular biology are discussed.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 366 (Molecular Biology and Biotechnology) or BIO 365

Prerequisites: BIOCH200 (Introductory Biochemistry) and (BIO 207 (Molecular Genetics and Heredity) or ENSC207) and (BIO 265 (General Microbiology) or ENSC265 (General Microbiology)) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 371 - Introduction to Immunology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

A course designed to introduce students to immunological concepts. Topics include: maturation and differentiation of B and T lymphocytes; structure and properties of antibodies; immune responses to antigens; genetic aspects of antibody synthesis; the basis of self and non self differentiation; hypersensitivity and immunodeficiency.

Prerequisites: BIO 201 (Cellular Biology) and BIO 207 (Molecular Genetics and Heredity) and BIOCH200 (Introductory Biochemistry) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 415 - Risk Assessment - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

Basic risk assessment and risk management principles and the application of risk assessment and environmental assessment processes. Topics include hazard identification, dose-response determination, risk analysis and perception, and exposure and site assessment. Practical application of risk assessment and management principles will be discussed, with hands-on, practical experience in evaluating risk and in communicating risk to industry, government, environmental groups, and the general public.

Note: BIO 352 or ENSC350 is recommended as a prerequisite.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 415 (Risk Assessment) or ENSC415 (Risk Assessment)

Prerequisites: (Biology (6SR) or Environmental Science (6SR) or (Biology (3SR) and Environmental Science (3SR) )) and Chemistry (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 450 - Independent Study - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Science

A senior course designed to permit students to receive credit for independent study under the guidance of a faculty member. Students wishing to enrol in this course should discuss their proposed area of study with the Department Chair who will, in consultation with the appropriate faculty member, decide if the student has permission to enrol in the course.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 465 - Advanced Microbiology and Biotechnology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

The molecular biology of bacterial genes with specific examples. Genetics of bacteria and bacteriophages. Energy, oxidative and biosynthetic metabolism of bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryotic microorganisms, with examples of biotechnology applications and bioremediation. Cell biology of microorganisms: chemotaxis, secretion, cell walls, and production of toxins. Use of microorganisms in large scale industrial processes and in molecular cloning and protein expression.

Prerequisites: BIO 265 (General Microbiology) or ENSC265 (General Microbiology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 470 - Senior Seminar in Biology - 3 (0-2s-0)
Faculty of Science

A course designed to introduce students to special topics not covered in other courses in the Department. Guest lectures will be featured and students will present seminars.

Note: Open to Biology majors in the third or fourth year of their program.

Prerequisites: Biology (9SR) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 480 - Advanced Research Methods - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Critical examination of research methods in Biology, including both lab and field techniques and safety considerations. Design of a research project and development of a grant proposal. Development of research budgets, ordering equipment and supplies, principles of laboratory design, record keeping, and research project management. The ethics and legalities of research, including Canadian Intellectual Property law.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BIO 480 (Advanced Research Methods) or ENSC485 (Advanced Research Methods)

Prerequisites: (BES 227 or BIO 227 (Science Communication) or ENSC227 (Science Communication)) and MAT 151 (Introduction to Statistical Methods) and Biology (12SR) and Chemistry (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 488 - Independent Research I - 3 (0-0-3)
Faculty of Science

An independent research project on current topics in Biology. Before starting the research, projects must be approved by the instructor.

Note: Students in the three-year program may enrol with Departmental permission.

Prerequisites: BIO 480 (Advanced Research Methods) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BIO 489 - Independent Research II - 3 (0-0-3)
Faculty of Science

A continuation of BIO 488, involving an independent research project on current topics in Biology. Oral communication, laboratory and library research techniques are emphasized.

Prerequisites: BIO 488 (Independent Research I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Biology/Environmental Science

BES 107 - Introduction to Cell Biology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Introductory cell structure and function. Origin of life, development of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell lineages, energy conversions, the compartmentation of biochemical functions within a cell, and intercellular communication. Genetic control of cell activities, mechanisms of molecular genetics, and their application in genetic engineering and biotechnology.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BES 107 (Introduction to Cell Biology) or BIO 107 or ENSC107

Prerequisites: ((Biology 30 or equivalent) or (Science 30 or equivalent) or BIO 100 (Introduction to Biological Systems)) and ((Chemistry 30 or equivalent) or CH 150 (The Core of Chemistry))

Further information: Course availability and times

BES 108 - Organisms in Their Environment - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

The effect of the environment on organisms, and the effect of activities of organisms on the current environment. Evolution of the major groups of organisms, reflection of evolutionary origins in classification of major lineages. The involvement of organisms in major ecosystem processes, the stability of those systems, and human impact on the processes.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) or BIO 108 or ENSC108

Prerequisites: ((Biology 30 or equivalent) or (Science 30 or equivalent) or BIO 100 (Introduction to Biological Systems) or ENSC101 (Introduction to Environmental Studies)) and ((Chemistry 30 or equivalent) or CH 150 (The Core of Chemistry))

Further information: Course availability and times

Business

BUS 110 - Business Fundamentals - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

An interdisciplinary approach to the basic elements involved in Canadian business. The theory of choice, behaviour theories, institutional arrangements, and several other business issues.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BUS 110 (Business Fundamentals) or BUS 310

Further information: Course availability and times

BUS 111 - Business Computations - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

This course reviews the fundamentals of mathematics and statistics needed for most business courses. Preliminary topics reviewed in this course will include basic arithmetic concepts, fractions, and order of operations. The course will then challenge students to develop confidence and competency when using algebraic expressions, linear equation, word equations, and exponents. Other relevant topics covered in the course include ratio, proportion, and percentages. Simple and compound interests will also be examine. The second half of this course will introduce students to the fundamentals of statistical principles and cover areas such as exploration and collection of data; and the fundamentals of probability distribution and statistical inferance. An exploration of relationships among variables will also be covered. In addition to all of the above math concepts identified above, students will also be introduced to the practical uses of a scientific/business calculator.

Note: Open only to students in the Faculty of Management

Further information: Course availability and times

BUS 112 - Business Statistics - 3 (3-0-1)
Faculty of Management

An introductory-level statistics course covering basic statistical concepts, analytical techniques, and methods of analysis. The focus is to build student knowledge and confidence with respect to the use of statistics in a variety of business applications. Course content includes descriptive statistics, probability, statistical inference, sampling techniques, measures of central tendency, expectations and variance.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BUS 112 (Business Statistics) or MAT 151 (Introduction to Statistical Methods) or SOC 210 (Introduction to Social Statistics) or PSY 211 (Statistical Methods for Psychological Research)

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) or (Applied Mathematics 30 or equivalent) or (Math 30-2 or equivalent)

Further information: Course availability and times

BUS 120 - Organizational Behaviour - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduction to the behavioural, political, and organization dynamics within an organization. Topics covered include organizational structure, culture, individual differences, personality, and motivation.

Prerequisites: BUS 110 (Business Fundamentals)

Further information: Course availability and times

BUS 201 - Introduction to e-Business - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

The advent of the Internet and the world wide web has had a profound effect on the ways that firms conduct business. Firms must rethink how they generate and deliver value, as well as how they attract and retain customers. The purpose of this course is to help students develop a broad understanding of the emerging forces that shape e-business.

Prerequisites: BUS 110 (Business Fundamentals) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BUS 210 - Principles of Business Law - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

An overview of the Canadian legal system is provided with an emphasis on the underlying considerations of social policy. The nature, philosophy, sources and policy objectives of the law are considered and analysed in the context of selected topics chosen from the fields of tort and contract.

Prerequisites: BUS 110 (Business Fundamentals) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BUS 220 - Principles of Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

An understanding of the management roles and skills necessary in exercising those roles is developed. Topics include the core principles of management, planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.

Prerequisites: BUS 110 (Business Fundamentals) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

BUS 250 - Management Information Systems - 3 (1.5-0-1.5)
Faculty of Management

This course covers information, business, technology, and the integrated set of activities used to run many organizations, including, but not limited to; supply chain management, relationship management, outsourcing and e-business. Strategic information systems decision making and database development tools are used.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of BUS 250 (Management Information Systems) or IT 302 (Database Systems)

Prerequisites: BUS 110 (Business Fundamentals) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Canadian Studies

CNST490 - Issues in Canadian Studies - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A capstone interdisciplinary seminar in Canadian studies. The course is designed around several themes which attempt to integrate the various facets of Canadian studies and analyse their impact on ideas, society, and identity.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: 24 credits from approved Canadian-content courses to include at least 6 credits each from three of the four general areas of study

Career Development

CDV 200 - Career Counselling Theory and Practice - 6 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

A conceptual and practical study of career counselling. Students will learn career counselling theory and practice, including fundamental counselling skills that apply in all helping relationships or working alliances.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CDV 200 (Career Counselling Theory and Practice) or CDV 400

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CDV 201 - Career Development Resources - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

A critical analysis of the many types and uses of resources in career development, from assessment tools to self-help books to multimedia products. How to find, review, select and use resources in a variety of career development settings such as counselling, consulting and facilitating.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CDV 201 (Career Development Resources) or CDV 301

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CDV 300 - Theories of Career Development - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of dominant theories, models and concepts within the career development field, including a history of the field. Structural, process, dynamic and eclectic approaches are included, with special attention being paid to recent Canadian work.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CDV 300 (Theories of Career Development) or HRM 300

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CDV 302 - The Nature of Work - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A critical analysis of the world of work and its relationship to career development practice. Traditional labour market concepts (supply and demand, types of employment), trend analysis and modern "work dynamic" concepts (sector analysis and work alternatives).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CDV 302 (The Nature of Work) or HRM 302

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CDV 303 - Group Approaches to Career Development - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

A theoretical and practical study of group interventions in career development. Students will learn concepts of and various methods of facilitation within a variety of group settings.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CDV 303 (Group Approaches to Career Development) or HRM 303

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CDV 304 - Specialized Issues in Career Development - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

A theoretical and practical study of specialized issues in career development. Specifically, students will learn concepts of and methods for working with specific populations (e.g., youth, older workers, Native Canadians) and individuals with specific barriers/issues (e.g., addictions, dysfunctional history).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CDV 304 (Specialized Issues in Career Development) or HRM 304

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CDV 305 - Career Development in Organizations - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

A primarily conceptual study of the role, functions and structures of career development within organizations of all forms (with a moderate amount of application). Students will learn the variety of ways that career development interventions are effectively integrated within organizational settings.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CDV 305 (Career Development in Organizations) or HRM 305

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CDV 306 - Career Development and Learning, Training and Education - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

A conceptual and practical study of the roles of and relationships between learning, training, education and career development. Students will learn concepts and strategies for professional development, workplace learning, competency profiling, institutional learning and other issues related to learning and career development.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CDV 306 (Career Development and Learning, Training and Education) or HRM 306

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Chemistry

CH 101 - Introductory University Chemistry I - 3 (3-1s-3)
Faculty of Science

Atoms, molecules, reactions, and stoichiometry; ideal gases; thermochemistry, calorimetry, and Hess' law; chemical equilibrium in the gaseous and liquid phases; acids and bases; solubility products; atomic structure and bonding.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 101 (Introductory University Chemistry I) or CH 100 or CH 204 or CH 205

Prerequisites: (Chemistry 30 or equivalent) or CH 150 (The Core of Chemistry)

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 102 - Introductory University Chemistry II - 3 (3-1s-3)
Faculty of Science

Bonding; chemistry of the transition metals and coordination chemistry; basic thermodynamics and spontaneity of reactions; redox reactions, electrochemistry, and the Nernst equation; basic chemical kinetics.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) or CH 100 or CH 204 or CH 206

Prerequisites: CH 101 (Introductory University Chemistry I)

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 150 - The Core of Chemistry - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

An introductory course for non-science students to (i) illustrate basic scientific thinking and philosophy, as applied to chemistry; (ii) demonstrate the ubiquity, importance, excitement, and value of chemistry; (iii) give a brief grounding in important chemical concepts, such as atoms, periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical reactivity, acid-base reactions, redox reactions; and (iv) provide students with basic information for informed and balanced discussion on such topics as food chemistry and nutrition, chemistry and medicine, air and water quality, feeding the world.

Note: This course is not accepted toward a Chemistry major, concentration, or minor.

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 211 - Quantitative Analytical Chemistry I - 3 (3-0-4)
Faculty of Science

The fundamental chemistry of quantitative analysis: principles, methods, and experimental applications of analysis. Handling and treatment of data using simple statistics. The course surveys the major titrimetric methods (acid-base, precipitation, complexation, and reduction-oxidation) with a significant focus on aqueous equilibria. Laboratory work focuses on the development of precise laboratory skills using the volumetric and gravimetric analysis of organic and inorganic compounds.

Prerequisites: CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 213 - Quantitative Analytical Chemistry II - 3 (3-0-4)
Faculty of Science

A continuation of CH 211; theory, methods, and practice of separation techniques; identification of analytes, including chromatography, spectrophotometry, potentiometry, voltammetry, and selective ion electrodes. Sampling, errors, reliability and treatment of data, and use of the analytical literature.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 213 (Quantitative Analytical Chemistry II) or CH 212 or CH 497 (Advanced Chemical Studies)

Prerequisites: CH 211 (Quantitative Analytical Chemistry I) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 261 - Basic Organic Chemistry I - 3 (3-1s-3)
Faculty of Science

Structure, three-dimensional shape, physical properties, and reactivity of simple organic compounds based on their functional groups; introduction to structure determination. Highlights applications to compounds of importance and interest in the natural and industrial world, including petrochemicals, halogenated organics, and polymers. Laboratory work introduces basic manipulative techniques and illustrates some of the more important reactions covered in lectures.

Note: Open to first-year students but recommended for second-year students.

Prerequisites: (Chemistry 30 or equivalent) or CH 150 (The Core of Chemistry)

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 263 - Basic Organic Chemistry II - 3 (3-1s-3)
Faculty of Science

A continuation of CH 261. Special attention given to biologically important molecules, as well as to compounds of significance to industry, including fats, detergents, aromatics, sugars, pharmaceuticals, amino-acids, and biopolymers. Laboratory work includes problem solving and illustrates some of the more important reactions covered in lectures.

Note: Open to first-year students but recommended for second-year students.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) or CH 160 or CH 163 or CH 260

Prerequisites: CH 261 (Basic Organic Chemistry I)

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 271 - Chemical Thermodynamics - 3 (3-1.5s-1.5)
Faculty of Science

Laws of thermodynamics with applications to systems with chemical change; fundamental equations; and thermodynamic functions; real gases; phase diagrams; equilibrium in multi-phase systems. Introduction to the chemical potential and chemical equilibria.

Prerequisites: CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and (MAT 113 or MAT 114 (Elementary Calculus I)) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 273 - Physical Chemistry - 3 (3-1.5s-1.5)
Faculty of Science

Implications of the Laws of Thermodynamics. Chemical potential and chemical equilibrium; ideal and non-ideal solutions; activity and standard states; electrochemical cells and chemical potential; colligative properties; surfaces; adsorption; simple theories of chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms; catalysis; transport properties.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 273 (Physical Chemistry) or CH 499 (Advanced Chemical Studies)

Prerequisites: CH 271 (Chemical Thermodynamics) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 303 - Introductory Environmental Chemistry - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An introductory course in the chemistry of environment. The chemical nature of environmental processes are examined with a major focus on atmospheric and aquatic chemistry, urban pollution, climate change, and acid rain. In addition, the use and environmental fate of heavy metals, chlorinated organic chemicals, and pesticides are discussed.

Note: CH 213, CH 263, and CH 271 are all recommended as prerequisites.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 303 (Introductory Environmental Chemistry) or CH 493 (Advanced Chemical Studies)

Prerequisites: CH 211 (Quantitative Analytical Chemistry I) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 261 (Basic Organic Chemistry I) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 321 - Industrial Chemistry - 3 (3-0-1)
Faculty of Science

Overview of the chemical, biochemical, and pharmaceutical industry in Alberta, the principal processes, scale-up of laboratory methods, modelling of processes, economic factors, automation, data management, feedback loops, quality assurance, safety, and project development. The course surveys areas such as metallurgy, the production of common inorganic chemicals, the petrochemical industry, and the production of various polymers. Chemical production related to agriculture and forestry are studied. The course also surveys the production of fine (or specialty) organic chemicals such as dyes and pharmaceuticals. The lab for this course consists of field trips to various industrial facilities in the Edmonton area.

Prerequisites: CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 331 - Introductory Inorganic Chemistry - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Atomic and periodic properties of the elements. A survey of Main Group elements and compounds with particular focus on bonding models (Valence Bond and Molecular Orbital Theory). The structures and properties of Main Group inorganic compounds are also covered. Practical laboratory work consists of the synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds with a significant reliance on spectroscopic techniques.

Prerequisites: CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 332 - Basic Inorganic Chemistry II: Transition Metals - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

A continuation of CH 331 with an emphasis on Transition Metal compounds. Covers the structure, bonding, properties, and reactivity of coordination compounds. Topics include Crystal Field Theory, Molecular Orbital Theory, electronic spectra, reaction mechanisms, and electron transfer reactions. A brief introduction into organometallic chemistry is also given. Practical work focuses on the synthesis and analysis of coordination and organometallic compounds.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 332 (Basic Inorganic Chemistry II: Transition Metals) or CH 494 (Advanced Chemical Studies)

Prerequisites: CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 331 (Introductory Inorganic Chemistry) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 365 - Organic Chemistry - 3 (3-0-4)
Faculty of Science

Analysis and exploration of organic reactions with emphasis on mechanisms and stereochemistry, including concerted reactions. Use of physicochemical methods and applications to synthesis. Laboratory work covers more advanced techniques and problem solving, and illustrates some of the more important reactions covered in lectures.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 365 (Organic Chemistry) or CH 496 (Advanced Chemical Studies)

Prerequisites: CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 367 - Advanced Organic Chemistry: Synthesis and Reactions - 3 (3-0-4)
Faculty of Science

Overview of strategies entailed in synthesis of organic compounds, including retro-synthetic analysis, use of synthons, 'green' routes, solid phase synthesis, asymmetric synthesis, stereo- and regio-selective synthesis, role of organo-metallics, and how to use the literature. Laboratory work introduces various advanced synthetic procedures and gives experience in devising a multistage synthesis of a target molecule. Labs may involve off-site visits.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 367 (Advanced Organic Chemistry: Synthesis and Reactions) or CH 486 (Advanced Chemical Studies)

Prerequisites: CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 382 - Quantum Chemistry - 3 (3-1s-0)
Faculty of Science

Introductory quantum chemistry with an emphasis on applications. Fundamentals of quantum mechanics, potential wall, hydrogen atom, many-electron atoms, Hartree-Fock approximation, diatomic molecules, neutral molecules. Introduction to spectroscopy and computational chemistry methods.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 382 (Quantum Chemistry) or CH 482 or CH 490 or CH 492 or PHY 301 (Quantum Mechanics)

Prerequisites: MAT 115 (Elementary Calculus II) and Chemistry (3SR) and 2nd year standing required and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: A minimum grade of C- in 3 Credits of senior-level Chemistry

CH 395 - Molecular Modelling - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Science

A practical, "hands-on" course. Chemical modelling. Molecular mechanics, semiempirical, and ab initio methods. Calculations of molecular properties. Examples range from simple molecules to large molecules. Introduction to drug design. Quantum chemical software is used.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 395 (Molecular Modelling) or CH 495

Prerequisites: Chemistry (3SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 437 - Inorganic Chemistry III: Organometallic Chemistry - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

A continuation of the inorganic chemistry stream and an introduction into organometallic chemistry. The course focuses on the bonding and reactivity of organometallic compounds. Attention is also given to the applications of organometallic compounds in industrial and organic syntheses. There is a significant reliance on spectroscopic techniques to illustrate the characteristics and properties of organometallic compounds.

Note: CH 365 is recommended as a corequisite.

Prerequisites: CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 332 (Basic Inorganic Chemistry II: Transition Metals) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Corequisites: CH 271 (Chemical Thermodynamics)

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 466 - Organic Chemistry and the Biosphere - 3 (3-0-4)
Faculty of Science

Families of organic compounds that are important in the biosphere, including those of current interest. Isolation, structure determination, analytical detection, aspects of synthesis, and possible role in vivo and mechanism of action. Students review literature on one such family or subfamily of compounds for presentation to the class. Students' choices will somewhat alter the syllabus each time the course is offered. Laboratory work covers more advanced techniques, problem solving, and illustrates some of the more important topics covered in lectures.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 466 (Organic Chemistry and the Biosphere) or CH 498 (Advanced Chemical Studies)

Prerequisites: CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 471 - Spectroscopic Methods - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Utilization of spectroscopy in structure determination with a major focus on Vibrational (IR, Raman) and NMR spectroscopic techniques. Topics related to IR spectroscopy include: molecular symmetry, group theory with an emphasis on applications to Vibrational spectroscopy, selection rules in IR and Raman spectroscopy, and the analysis of vibrational spectra of polyatomic molecules. Additional material related to Rotational spectroscopy will be presented. Topics related to NMR spectroscopy include: discussion of first order NMR spectra, classical description of magnetic resonance experiments, the rotating frame of reference, relaxation effects, Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy, and a survey of common two-dimensional NMR experiments. Focus will be on both theory and practical applications.

Note: CH 382 is recommended as a prerequisite.

Prerequisites: CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 271 (Chemical Thermodynamics) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 479 - Molecular Kinetics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Rate laws for simple and complex reactions, reaction mechanisms, potential energy surfaces, molecular dynamics, theories of reaction rates, catalysis, with application to gas and liquid phase reactions, photochemical reactions in chemistry and biology, and enzyme catalysis.

Prerequisites: CH 271 (Chemical Thermodynamics) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Corequisites: CH 273 (Physical Chemistry) or CH 499 (Advanced Chemical Studies)

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 486 - Advanced Chemical Studies - 3 (3-0-4)
Faculty of Science

An enhanced version of CH 367, taken as a capstone course in the third or the fourth year of a Chemistry concentration or major. Additional reading, research, or project work, by agreement with the instructor, leading to a substantial written report.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 486 (Advanced Chemical Studies) or CH 367 (Advanced Organic Chemistry: Synthesis and Reactions)

Prerequisites: CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 491 - Chemical Research - 3 (0-0-0)
Faculty of Science

A minimum of six weeks of original research carried out in the summer months (May-August), likely at an off-campus location. In addition, another six weeks spent in the undergraduate laboratories at Concordia. These would be paid positions, subject to available funding. The project to be completed during the Fall semester.

Note: Open only to students who have completed their third year and are entering their fourth year in the Chemistry four-year degree program.

Prerequisites: CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 273 (Physical Chemistry) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 332 (Basic Inorganic Chemistry II: Transition Metals) [C- minimum grade required] and 4th year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 493 - Advanced Chemical Studies - 3 (3-1s-0)
Faculty of Science

An enhanced version of CH 303, to be taken as a capstone course in the third or fourth year of a Chemistry concentration or major. Additional reading, research, or project work, by agreement with the instructor, leading to a substantial written report.

Note: CH 271 is recommended as a corequisite.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 493 (Advanced Chemical Studies) or CH 303 (Introductory Environmental Chemistry)

Prerequisites: CH 211 (Quantitative Analytical Chemistry I) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 261 (Basic Organic Chemistry I) [C- minimum grade required] and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Corequisites: CH 213 (Quantitative Analytical Chemistry II) and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II)

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 494 - Advanced Chemical Studies - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

An enhanced version of CH 332, to be taken as a capstone course in the third or fourth year of a Chemistry concentration or major. Additional reading, research, or project work, by agreement with the instructor, leading to a substantial written report.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 494 (Advanced Chemical Studies) or CH 332 (Basic Inorganic Chemistry II: Transition Metals)

Prerequisites: CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 331 (Introductory Inorganic Chemistry) [C- minimum grade required] and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 496 - Advanced Chemical Studies - 3 (3-0-4)
Faculty of Science

An enhanced version of CH 365, to be taken as a capstone course in the third or fourth year of a Chemistry concentration or major. Additional reading, research, or project work, by agreement with the instructor, leading to a substantial written report.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 496 (Advanced Chemical Studies) or CH 365 (Organic Chemistry)

Prerequisites: CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 497 - Advanced Chemical Studies - 3 (3-0-4)
Faculty of Science

An enhanced version of CH 213, to be taken as a capstone course in the third or fourth year of a Chemistry concentration or major. Additional reading, research, or project work, by agreement with the instructor, leading to a substantial written report.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 497 (Advanced Chemical Studies) or CH 212 or CH 213 (Quantitative Analytical Chemistry II) or CH 490

Prerequisites: CH 211 (Quantitative Analytical Chemistry I) [C- minimum grade required] and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 498 - Advanced Chemical Studies - 3 (3-0-4)
Faculty of Science

An enhanced version of CH 466, to be taken as a capstone course in the third or fourth year of a Chemistry concentration or major. Additional reading, research, or project work, by agreement with the instructor, leading to a substantial written report.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 498 (Advanced Chemical Studies) or CH 466 (Organic Chemistry and the Biosphere)

Prerequisites: CH 102 (Introductory University Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and CH 263 (Basic Organic Chemistry II) [C- minimum grade required] and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

CH 499 - Advanced Chemical Studies - 3 (3-1.5s-1.5)
Faculty of Science

An enhanced version of CH 273, to be taken as a capstone course in the third or fourth year of a Chemistry concentration or major. Additional reading, research, or project work, by agreement with the instructor, leading to a substantial written report.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CH 499 (Advanced Chemical Studies) or CH 273 (Physical Chemistry) or CH 490

Prerequisites: CH 271 (Chemical Thermodynamics) [C- minimum grade required] and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

Chinese

CHIN 101 - Beginners' Chinese I - 3 (0-5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

An entry-level course designed to give students a good introduction to spoken and written Chinese. Students will learn 150 characters and 150 vocabulary words.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CHIN 101 (Beginners' Chinese I) or (30-level Chinese or equivalent)

Further information: Course availability and times

CHIN 102 - Beginners' Chinese II - 3 (0-5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

As a sequel course to CHIN 101, this course is designed to give students further training in spoken and written Chinese. Students will learn 300 characters and 300 vocabulary words.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CHIN 102 (Beginners' Chinese II) or (30-level Chinese or equivalent)

Prerequisites: CHIN 101

Further information: Course availability and times

Classics

CLAS102 - Greek and Roman Mythology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Survey of classical mythology. Readings of ancient and modern works (in English translation).

Further information: Course availability and times

CLAS201 - Literature of Greece and Rome - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduction to the literature of Greece and Rome. Reading of a limited number of major works (in English translation) including epic, drama, and history.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CLAS203 - Civilization of Ancient Greece - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course examines ancient Greek civilization from the Bronze Age down to the end of the Hellenistic era. The cultural achievements of the ancient Greeks are highlighted (e.g., art, architecture, literature, religion, medicine, philosophy), as are Greek cultural constructions of race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and slavery, prostitution, witchcraft, foreign influence. There are various aspects of ancient Greek life which many of us today find disconcerting. In this course, students will engage in an honest and forthright discussion about this hugely influential civilization and its impact on subsequent western culture.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CLAS205 - Ancient Roman Civilization - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course examines ancient Roman civilization from approximately 756 B.C. down to the 600s A.D. The cultural achievements of the ancient Romans are highlighted (e.g., art, architecture, literature, religion, medicine, philosophy), as are Roman cultural constructions of national identity, Greek influences, gender and sexuality, slavery, prostitution, religion, witchcraft, and foreign influences. There are various aspects of ancient Roman life which many of us today find disconcerting. In this course, students will engage in an honest and forthright discussion about this hugely influential civilization and its impact on subsequent western culture.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CLAS357 - Greek and Roman Religions - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A comparative study of ancient Greek and Roman religions, examining mythologies, ideologies, and practices with respect to religious, historical, and social factors.

Note: CLAS357 cannot be used toward the Religious Studies core requirement or towards a major, concentration or minor in Religious Studies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CLAS357 (Greek and Roman Religions) or REL 302 (Greek and Roman Religions)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Comparative Literature

CLIT201 - Literature of the European Tradition I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The classics of European literature in English translation representing the major periods and genres from antiquity to the seventeenth century.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Prerequisites: ENG 100 or ENG 110 or (ENG 111 (Literature and Composition I) and ENG 112 (Literature and Composition II)) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CLIT202 - Literature of the European Tradition II - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The masterpieces of European literature in English translation from Neoclassicism to the present day through a representative selection of authors and playwrights.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Prerequisites: ENG 100 or ENG 110 or (ENG 111 (Literature and Composition I) and ENG 112 (Literature and Composition II)) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Computing Science

CMPT111 - Introduction to Computing Science - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

An overview of computing science concepts, including: algorithms and their properties; control constructs of sequence, selection, and repetition; functions; basic data types and data representation; overview of programming languages; and history of computing. Students will be required to do some programming.

Further information: Course availability and times

CMPT211 - Introduction to Software Development - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to software development through the study of computational thinking and the art of programming. Topics include abstraction, algorithms, data structures, encapsulation, resource management, and software engineering. Problem sets inspired by real-world domains of biology, cryptography, finance, and gaming.

Prerequisites: CMPT111 (Introduction to Computing Science) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CMPT221 - Algorithms - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

Systematic study of basic concepts and techniques in the design and analysis of algorithms, illustrated from various problem areas. Topics include review of fundamental tools (algorithm analysis, basic data structures, searching, sorting, fundamental techniques), graph algorithms (graphs, weighted graphs, matching and flow), Internet algorithmics (text processing, number theory and cryptography, network algorithms), NP and computational intractability, computational geometry, algorithmic frameworks. Analysis techniques to estimate run-time efficiency.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CMPT221 (Algorithms) or CMPT205

Prerequisites: CMPT220 [C- minimum grade required] and (MAT 113 [C- minimum grade required] or MAT 114 (Elementary Calculus I) [C- minimum grade required] ) and MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CMPT340 - Numerical Methods - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to numerical methods: floating-point number representation, errors and role of stability in numerical calculations; direct and iterative solutions of linear systems of equations; methods for solving non-linear equations; interpolation; least-squares approximation of functions; numerical integration; and numerical solution of initial value problems for ordinary differential equations.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CMPT340 (Numerical Methods) or MAT 340 (Numerical Methods)

Prerequisites: MAT 115 (Elementary Calculus II) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 120 (Linear Algebra I) [C- minimum grade required] and (Mathematics (12) or Computing Science (6) or Information Technology (6) ) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CMPT421 - Introduction to Combinatorics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Methods and applications of combinatorial mathematics including graph theory (matchings, chromatic numbers, planar graphs, independence and clique numbers) and related algorithms, combinatorial designs (block designs, Latin squares, projective geometries), error correcting codes.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CMPT421 (Introduction to Combinatorics) or MAT 421 (Introduction to Combinatorics)

Prerequisites: MAT 120 (Linear Algebra I) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 321 (Introduction to Discrete Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

CMPT474 - Formal Languages, Automata and Computability - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Formal grammars; normal forms; relationship between grammars and automata; regular expressions; finite state machines, state minimization; pushdown automata; Turing machines; computability; complexity; introduction to recursive function theory.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of CMPT474 (Formal Languages, Automata and Computability) or MAT 424 (Formal Languages, Automata and Computability)

Prerequisites: MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and (Mathematics (12) or Computing Science (9) or Information Technology (9) ) and 2nd year standing required or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: *9 additional credits of Mathematics to a total of 12 including MAT 200

Dance

DAN 250 - Ballet - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduction to the study of Ballet dance techniques, performance, and history through theory and practical experience.

Note: An additional fee is charged (section 5.1).

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

DAN 275 - Dance Forms - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduction to one of the dance forms: ballet, jazz, tap, or selected ethnic dance forms.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

DAN 340 - Modern Dance - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduction to the study of creative dance techniques, improvisation, composition, and performance through theory and practical experience.

Note: An additional fee is charged (section 5.1).

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

DAN 375 - Social Dance - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Theory and practice of social (ballroom) dance forms.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Data Management

DTM 401 - Data Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

This course provides students an opportunity to study a special interest topic in data management for business decision-making. Students will learn to be effective analysts by locating, analyzing, and interpreting secondary data used in various business decision scenarios. The student will also present their research by writing briefing notes where information is concisely presented in a short paper intended for decision makers. In the course, the student is expected to learn and share insights into the future and applicability of business analytics in decision-making.

Prerequisites: BUS 112 (Business Statistics) and MARK223 (Marketing Research) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

DTM 402 - Business Demography - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

In the course, the study of population structure and dynamics are addressed and how these relate to practical decision-making in business, government, or other organizations. Applied business demographys purpose is to help people make good practical decisions in matters affected by population structure and dynamics. Special attention will be given to applications of applied business demography in real-world systems through the use of case studies.

Prerequisites: BUS 112 (Business Statistics) and MARK223 (Marketing Research) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Drama

DRA 101 - Introduction to Theatre Art - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The World of Theatre and selective histories; the role of theatre spaces; directors, designers and actors in today's theatre; how theatre can enrich our lives. This is a lecture course; no acting required.

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 102 - Play Analysis - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Reading and critiquing a variety of play scripts. This leads to applying creative solutions to the problems surrounding the live production of these plays. The class observes a filmed performance of each play. No acting required.

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 149 - Introduction to Dramatic Process - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Exploring speech, movement, and improvisation through acting, ensemble work, and theatre games, and participation in self-created dramas of different forms. This is a practical, performance based class.

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 247 - Introduction to and Development of Oral Communication - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Arts

A speech and acting course that explores communication by way of voice and body. Through individual and group projects based on the interpretation of literature, students strengthen their presentation skills.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 252 - Fundamentals of Public Speaking - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Basic techniques of oral communication and public speaking with an emphasis on speech construction and delivery.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of DRA 252 (Fundamentals of Public Speaking) or DRA 352

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 276 - Fundamentals of Technical Theatre and Stagecraft - 3 (1.5-0-1.5)
Faculty of Arts

This class covers the fundamentals of technical theatre and stage craft including an introduction to design principles, set and prop design and construction, stage lighting, stage management and production management. This class includes lectures, demonstrations, practical experience and projects.

Prerequisites: DRA 101 (Introduction to Theatre Art) or DRA 102 (Play Analysis) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 307 - Special Projects in Theatre Performance or Production I - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in the rehearsal and performance of a major Drama Department theatre production. Students audition or interview to participate in the course as performers, technicians, or stage managers.

Note: Admission into this course will be by audition/interview for actors or interview for stage managers and technicians. Auditions and interviews will occur before the semester in which the student wishes to enrol begins.

Prerequisites: DRA 149 (Introduction to Dramatic Process) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 308 - Special Project in Theatre Performance or Production II - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in the rehearsal and performance of a major Drama Department theatre production or a dramatic production deemed suitable by the department. Students may participate in the course as performers, technicians, or stage-managers.

Note: Admission into this course will be by audition/interview for actors or interview for stage managers and technicians. Auditions and interviews will occur before the semester in which the student wishes to enrol begins.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of DRA 308 (Special Project in Theatre Performance or Production II) or DRA 309 (Extended Special Project in Theatre Performance or Production)

Prerequisites: DRA 307 (Special Projects in Theatre Performance or Production I) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 309 - Extended Special Project in Theatre Performance or Production - 6 (0-12L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in the rehearsal and performance of a major Drama Department theatre production or a dramatic production deemed suitable by the department. Students may participate in the course as performers, technicians, or stage-managers.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of DRA 309 (Extended Special Project in Theatre Performance or Production) or DRA 308 (Special Project in Theatre Performance or Production II)

Prerequisites: DRA 307 (Special Projects in Theatre Performance or Production I) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 325 - Creativity in Theatre for Young Audiences - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Theory and practice of the creative process of drama in theatre for young audiences. Students explore the creative potential of the actor (movement, imagination, speech) as expressed through the interdisciplinary nature of performing for or performing with young audiences. Ensemble acting required.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of DRA 325 (Creativity in Theatre for Young Audiences) or DRA 425 (Studies in Advanced Theatre for Young Audiences)

Prerequisites: DRA 149 (Introduction to Dramatic Process) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 350 - An Introduction to Film-Making and Appreciation - 3 (2-0-4)
Faculty of Arts

An examination of the global film industry as both an art form and a business. Students will experience selected film and production activities in order to enhance their appreciation of the industry.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of DRA 350 (An Introduction to Film-Making and Appreciation) or DRA 450 (Studies in Advanced Film-Making)

Prerequisites: DRA 101 (Introduction to Theatre Art) or DRA 102 (Play Analysis) or DRA 149 (Introduction to Dramatic Process) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 353 - Scene Study I - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Acting, including the analysis and enactment of scripted scenes and characterization.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of DRA 353 (Scene Study I) or DRA 453 (Studies in Advanced Acting)

Prerequisites: DRA 149 (Introduction to Dramatic Process) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 383 - Fundamentals of Directing and Play Production - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Arts

A focus on basic techniques of directing explored through practical exercises. Students also examine other elements of play production including basic set, lighting, and costume design as well as practical methods of producing and presenting performance.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of DRA 383 (Fundamentals of Directing and Play Production) or DRA 483 (Studies in Advanced Play Production)

Prerequisites: DRA 101 (Introduction to Theatre Art) or DRA 102 (Play Analysis) and 2nd year standing required

Corequisites: DRA 149 (Introduction to Dramatic Process)

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 425 - Studies in Advanced Theatre for Young Audiences - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students complete DRA 325 with additional assignments including a showcase project, normally performed in schools and arranged with the instructor. This is an advanced course that corresponds to the vocational interests of students and that normally takes place in the final year of their program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of DRA 425 (Studies in Advanced Theatre for Young Audiences) or DRA 325 (Creativity in Theatre for Young Audiences)

Prerequisites: (DRA 101 (Introduction to Theatre Art) or DRA 102 (Play Analysis)) and DRA 149 (Introduction to Dramatic Process) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 450 - Studies in Advanced Film-Making - 3 (2-0-4)
Faculty of Arts

Students complete DRA 350 with additional assignments including a showcase film project (24 edited minutes) arranged with the instructor. This is an advanced course that corresponds to the vocational interests of students and that normally takes place in the final year of their program.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of DRA 450 (Studies in Advanced Film-Making) or DRA 350 (An Introduction to Film-Making and Appreciation)

Prerequisites: (DRA 101 (Introduction to Theatre Art) or DRA 102 (Play Analysis)) and DRA 149 (Introduction to Dramatic Process) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 453 - Studies in Advanced Acting - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students complete DRA 353 with additional assignments including a showcase solo or duo acting project arranged with the instructor. This is an advanced course that corresponds to the vocational interests of students and that normally takes place in the final year of their program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of DRA 453 (Studies in Advanced Acting) or DRA 353 (Scene Study I)

Prerequisites: (DRA 101 (Introduction to Theatre Art) or DRA 102 (Play Analysis)) and DRA 149 (Introduction to Dramatic Process) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

DRA 483 - Studies in Advanced Play Production - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students complete DRA 383 with additional assignments including a showcase directing project arranged with the instructor. This is an advanced course that corresponds to the vocational interests of students and that normally takes place in the final year of their program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of DRA 483 (Studies in Advanced Play Production) or DRA 383 (Fundamentals of Directing and Play Production)

Prerequisites: (DRA 101 (Introduction to Theatre Art) or DRA 102 (Play Analysis)) and DRA 149 (Introduction to Dramatic Process) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

Earth Science

EAS 101 - Introduction to Physical Earth Science - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Formation of the earth and its internal structure. Introduction to minerals, rocks, structural geology, and plate tectonics; mineral and energy resources. Geomorphic agents, processes, and landforms.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of EAS 101 (Introduction to Physical Earth Science) or GEOG130

Further information: Course availability and times

EAS 102 - Introduction to Environmental Earth Science - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Heating of the earth's surface and energy balances; nature of the atmosphere, winds, and global heat transfer mechanisms; moisture, instability, and storm systems. Basic weather forecasting. Hydrologic cycle and water balance. World climate and climatic change. Ecosystem dynamics and terrestrial biomes. Soil characteristics and classification.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of EAS 102 (Introduction to Environmental Earth Science) or GEOG131

Further information: Course availability and times

Economics

ECO 101 - Introduction to Microeconomics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Economic analysis, problems, and policies with emphasis on the Canadian economy; consumers and firms in competitive and monopolistic markets; the distribution of income; the use of the environment; government economic policies.

Further information: Course availability and times

ECO 102 - Introduction to Macroeconomics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to macroeconomic concepts, problems, and methods of analysis with emphasis on the Canadian economy. Topics include national income accounting; the specification and definition of key macroeconomic variables; the relationship between Canada and the international economy; the formation of and constraints on monetary and fiscal policy; theories of unemployment and inflation.

Further information: Course availability and times

ECO 281 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The theory of consumer behaviour; theory of production and cost; price and output determination under competition, monopoly, and other market structures.

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) and ECO 101 (Introduction to Microeconomics) and ECO 102 (Introduction to Macroeconomics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ECO 282 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to analytical macroeconomic modelling. Topics include flexible and fixed wage models of price, interest rate, output, and employment determination with emphasis on the relationship between the labour market and aggregate supply; the impact of fiscal, monetary, and supply shocks; open economy macroecoonomics with fixed and flexible exchange rates and prices, as well as international capital mobility.

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) and ECO 101 (Introduction to Microeconomics) and ECO 102 (Introduction to Macroeconomics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ECO 301 - Economics of Globalization - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course examines the theory, evidence, institutions, market mechanisms, political, social and cultural perspectives and policies related to globalization, which will enable students to develop a critical understanding of globalization issues.

Prerequisites: ECO 102 (Introduction to Macroeconomics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ECO 341 - Money and Banking - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Analysis of money and credit in the exchange process. Financial intermediation, commercial banking, central banking, and regulation of banking and financial sectors. The money supply process and elementary issues of monetary control.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Corequisites: ECO 281 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory I)

Further information: Course availability and times

ECO 350 - The Economics of Public Expenditures - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Analysis of public sector expenditures in Canada. The rationale for government spending and the problems in provision of public services.

Prerequisites: ECO 281 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ECO 369 - Economics of the Environment - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Application of ideas and principles of economics to environmental issues. Focus is on the impact of economic development on the environment, problems of measurement of environmental deterioration, and analysis of policies aimed at protection of the environment. Current Canadian environmental topics.

Prerequisites: ECO 101 (Introduction to Microeconomics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Education (After Degree)

EDUC501 - Introduction to Planning in the Elementary School - 6 (3-1s-0)
Faculty of Education

The theoretical perspectives that influence the design and implementation of elementary school programs. The principles and practices of long-range, unit, and lesson plans. Students will design units and lessons suitable for implementation in an elementary school. The laboratory section of the course focuses on the infusion of technology and its application to digital program planning.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Further information: Course availability and times

EDUC502 - Advanced Planning in the Elementary School - 3 (0-13s-0)
Faculty of Education

The principles of program and lesson design and the design and delivery of unit and lesson plans for an elementary school classroom experience related to Education 532. Other topics relevant to curriculum design and delivery may be addressed as needed.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Prerequisites: EDUC501 (Introduction to Planning in the Elementary School)

Corequisites: EDUC532 (Field Experience in the Elementary School III) and EDUC542 (Reflections on Field Experience III)

Further information: Course availability and times

EDUC503 - Advanced Planning in the Elementary School II - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

Effective communication and technology processes for productivity within the context of the Alberta Program of Studies. Students will demonstrate ability to use different productivity processes and knowledge of program and classroom methodologies to design programs for an elementary school experience. Communicating progress and working with the wider school and parent community will be explored.

Note: This course also requires 1 hour per week of online work.
Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Prerequisites: EDUC501 (Introduction to Planning in the Elementary School)

Further information: Course availability and times

EDUC511 - Curriculum Design and Instructional Methods in the Elementary School - 9 (0-10L-5)
Faculty of Education

Examination of theory, content, and instructional processes in all core and some optional subjects taught in the elementary school. Experience with various methods of teaching and planning for teaching.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Further information: Course availability and times

EDUC521 - Literature and Literacy for Elementary School - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

Students gain a practical and theoretical orientation to ways of using children's literature to teach language arts across the Elementary School Curriculum.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Prerequisites: EDUC511 (Curriculum Design and Instructional Methods in the Elementary School)

Further information: Course availability and times

EDUC522 - Mathematics Education for Elementary School - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Students gain a practical and theoretical orientation to the Elementary School Mathematics Curriculum.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Prerequisites: EDUC511 (Curriculum Design and Instructional Methods in the Elementary School)

Further information: Course availability and times

EDUC523 - Science Education for Elementary School - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

The Elementary School Science Program (Alberta Education) and the two main areas of skill emphasis: science inquiry and problem-solving through technology. In science inquiry the focus is on asking questions and finding answers based on evidence; in problem solving through technology the focus is on practical tasks - finding ways to make and do things to meet a given need.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Prerequisites: EDUC511 (Curriculum Design and Instructional Methods in the Elementary School)

Further information: Course availability and times

EDUC524 - Social Studies Education for Elementary School - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

Students gain a practical and theoretical orientation to the elementary school social studies curriculum.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Prerequisites: EDUC511 (Curriculum Design and Instructional Methods in the Elementary School)

Further information: Course availability and times

EDUC531 - Field Experience in the Elementary School II - 3 (0-0-0)
Faculty of Education

Work with a cooperating teacher in designing lessons, organizing learning environments, setting learning tasks, managing classroom behaviours, and evaluating children's progress.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Prerequisites: EDUC511 (Curriculum Design and Instructional Methods in the Elementary School) and Consent of Department and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Security Clearance Required

EDUC532 - Field Experience in the Elementary School III - 9 (0-0-0)
Faculty of Education

Students assume full responsibility for an elementary school classroom in one of Concordia's partner schools over a graduated and directed period of time. Supervision and evaluation of students will be a dual responsibility between a certificated teacher and a Concordia education faculty member.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Prerequisites: EDUC531 (Field Experience in the Elementary School II) and EDUC541 (Reflections on Field Experience I & II: Inclusive Education) and Consent of Department and special conditions as specified below

Corequisites: EDUC502 (Advanced Planning in the Elementary School) and EDUC542 (Reflections on Field Experience III)

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Security Clearance Required

EDUC541 - Reflections on Field Experience I & II: Inclusive Education - 3 (2-1s-0)
Faculty of Education

An examination of pedagogical and classroom management techniques that promote effective learning for all students and reduce or eliminate the need for exclusion from the regular classroom or classroom activities. Positive discipline, differentiated instruction, universal design for learning, and individualized programming are presented and discussed in terms of what they can offer the inclusive school and classroom.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Corequisites: EDUC531 (Field Experience in the Elementary School II)

Further information: Course availability and times

EDUC542 - Reflections on Field Experience III - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Education

Students examine issues and concerns encountered in their EDUC 532 field experience. The class will include interactions with online materials, speakers, group discussions, and tools for reflective practice.

Note: This course also requires 2 hours per week of online work.
Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Prerequisites: EDUC531 (Field Experience in the Elementary School II) and EDUC541 (Reflections on Field Experience I & II: Inclusive Education)

Corequisites: EDUC502 (Advanced Planning in the Elementary School) and EDUC532 (Field Experience in the Elementary School III)

Further information: Course availability and times

EDUC551 - The Organizational Framework of Teaching - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

Examination of the rather complex system within which teachers work. The structure of the teacher's work environment - the organizational, legal, and social structures that are evident in contemporary schools.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Further information: Course availability and times

EDUC561 - Teaching and Schooling in Western Civilization - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

How western educational thought has influenced teaching and schooling. The development of schooling from Plato to the present.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Further information: Course availability and times

EDUC571 - Learning, Instructional Psychology and Educational Practice - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

Theories of learning, and the applicability of theories of learning to instruction. Topics that are relevant to learning and pedagogy, including cognition, motivation, assessment and measurement of learning, instructional science, the context of learning, and factors that facilitate learning in the classroom.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Education 'After Degree' program.

Further information: Course availability and times

Education

ED 199 - Introduction to the Profession of Teaching - 3 (3-0-1)
Faculty of Education

The multiple roles of a teacher and the expectations of teachers in these roles; the professional life of a teacher and the historical and contemporary issues that influence it; curricula, pedagogy, instructional effectiveness, and children's learning styles. Includes in-school visitations.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ED 199 (Introduction to the Profession of Teaching) or EDPR151 or EDPR199

Further information: Course availability and times

Educational Foundations

EDFD211 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

A course designed to introduce students to the field of early childhood education. Topics examined include the role of early childhood teachers, the Reggio Emilia approach to early learning, understanding play, programming for children birth through age eight, early learning environments, and family and community partnerships.

Prerequisites: ED 199 (Introduction to the Profession of Teaching) and EDPS200 (Educational Psychology for Teaching) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

EDFD321 - Children's Literature in the Elementary Classroom - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

A course designed to introduce students to children's literature and literature-based instruction in the elementary classroom. Topics examined include genres in children's literature, children and book selection, literature-based instruction, literacy environments, literature and technology, and literacy partnerships.

Prerequisites: ED 199 (Introduction to the Profession of Teaching) and EDPS200 (Educational Psychology for Teaching) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

EDFD341 - Concepts of Childhood in History - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

Origins of modern concepts of childhood and their relationship to educational thought and practice.

Note: EDFD341 cannot be used towards the Social Science core requirement or towards a concentration or minor in History.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of EDFD341 (Concepts of Childhood in History) or HIS 225

Prerequisites: ED 199 (Introduction to the Profession of Teaching) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Educational Psychology

EDPS200 - Educational Psychology for Teaching - 3 (2-1s-0)
Faculty of Education

Theories, research, and issues in educational psychology and their classroom application. Topics typically covered include human development, learning, and instruction, student motivation, and individual differences in student abilities.

Note: Open to first-year students.

Further information: Course availability and times

EDPS341 - Psychology of Exceptional Children and Youth - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

An overview of major approaches to teaching children and youth with significant differences in ability and/or social and emotional development. Adaptations in the environment, teaching strategies, assessment and curriculum are discussed. Societal influences on current practices and support services are also considered.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of EDPS341 (Psychology of Exceptional Children and Youth) or PSY 359 (Atypical Development)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

English

ENG 101 - Literature and Composition for English Language Learners I - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduction to literary studies and essay writing. This course provides support and instruction in composition and literature to students whose first language is not English.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENG 101 (Literature and Composition for English Language Learners I) or ENG 100 or ENG 110 or ENG 111 (Literature and Composition I)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 102 - Literature and Composition for English Language Learners II - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Intermediate literary studies and essay writing. This course provides support and instruction in composition and literature to students whose first language is not English.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENG 102 (Literature and Composition for English Language Learners II) or ENG 100 or ENG 110 or ENG 112 (Literature and Composition II)

Prerequisites: ENG 101 (Literature and Composition for English Language Learners I) or ENG 111 (Literature and Composition I)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 111 - Literature and Composition I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduction to literary studies and essay writing.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENG 111 (Literature and Composition I) or ENG 100 or ENG 101 (Literature and Composition for English Language Learners I) or ENG 110

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 112 - Literature and Composition II - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Intermediate literary studies and essay writing.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENG 112 (Literature and Composition II) or ENG 100 or ENG 102 (Literature and Composition for English Language Learners II) or ENG 110

Prerequisites: ENG 111 (Literature and Composition I)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 120 - British Literature from 1300 to 1800 - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of English Literature by writers of the British Isles, from its beginnings in medieval times up to 1800.

Note: This course is strongly recommended for students considering a major or minor in English.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENG 120 (British Literature from 1300 to 1800) or ENG 101 (Literature and Composition for English Language Learners I) or ENG 111 (Literature and Composition I)

Prerequisites: (English 30 or equivalent) [65% minimum grade required]

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 121 - British Literature from 1800 to the Present - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of English Literature by writers of the British Isles from 1800 to the present.

Note: This course is strongly recommended for students considering a major or minor in English.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENG 121 (British Literature from 1800 to the Present) or ENG 102 (Literature and Composition for English Language Learners II) or ENG 112 (Literature and Composition II)

Prerequisites: ENG 101 (Literature and Composition for English Language Learners I) or ENG 111 (Literature and Composition I) or ENG 120 (British Literature from 1300 to 1800)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 303 - Poetry - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Major modes, forms, and kinds of English poetry, with examples from the fourteenth to the twentieth century. Develops basic principles of formal poetic analysis through close readings of poems.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 304 - The Short Story - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The short story tradition in English, including its historical development. Critical analysis focuses on stories written in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 323 - Chaucer - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Selections from the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 324 - The Later Middle Ages - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The literature of fourteenth- and fifteenth-century England, excluding Chaucer.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 330 - The Early English Renaissance - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The literature of sixteenth-century England, including Shakespeare's non-dramatic poetry, showing the influence of Renaissance ideas and literary forms.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 331 - The Later English Renaissance - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The literature of seventeenth-century England, including Milton, in the light of intellectual developments of the period.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 338 - Shakespeare - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Representative plays from various periods in Shakespeare's life and from the different genres: tragedy, comedy, romance, history, and problem plays.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 339 - Further Studies in Shakespeare - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Further study of Shakespeare, covering plays not studied in ENG 338.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 341 - The Augustan Age - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Representative works by writers from the Restoration and early eighteenth century.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 342 - Eighteenth-Century English Novel - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A historical survey of the development of the English novel during the eighteenth century. Reading lists will vary but may include novels by some or all of the following authors: Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Laurence Sterne, Tobias Smollett, Frances Burney, and Jane Austen.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 343 - The Age of Sensibility - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Works of representative writers of the later eighteenth century, including the precursors of Romanticism.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 350 - British Romantic Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Representative literature (including poetry, fiction, and non-fiction prose) of the Romantic period, focusing on selected works of the major Romantic poets (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats).

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 354 - Victorian Poetry - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Representative works by British poets writing between the 1830s and 1900.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 355 - Currents of Thought in Victorian Prose - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to the political, religious, artistic, educational, and social issues facing the Victorians as examined by some of the greatest prose writers in English, including Carlyle, Ruskin, Newman, Mill, Huxley, Arnold, Morris, and Dickens.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 356 - Nineteenth-Century English Novel - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A historical survey of the development of the English novel during the nineteenth century. Reading lists will vary but may include novels by some or all of the following authors: Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, Charles Dickens, William Makepeace Thackeray, George Eliot, and Henry James.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 365 - Early Twentieth-Century British Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Representative works from 1900 to 1940.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 366 - Mid-Twentieth Century British Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Representative works from 1940 to 1980.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 367 - Contemporary British Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Representative works from 1980 to the present.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 381 - Canadian Literature to 1900 - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A critical and historical study of representative Canadian literature to 1900.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 382 - Early Twentieth-Century Canadian Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A critical and historical study of representative Canadian literature from 1900 to 1940.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 383 - Mid-Twentieth Century Canadian Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A critical and historical study of representative Canadian literature from 1940 to 1980.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 384 - Contemporary Canadian Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A critical and historical study of representative Canadian literature from 1980 to the present.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 390 - Graphic Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A historical and critical survey of a selection of comic books and graphic novels through the lens of publishing history, genre, and aesthetic properties.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 392 - American Literature to 1900 - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Representative works up to 1900 by American writers such as Emerson, Hawthorne, Poe, Stowe, Whitman, Melville, Dickinson, Twain, James, and Chopin.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENG 392 (American Literature to 1900) or ENG 359

Prerequisites: ENG 100 or ENG 110 or (ENG 111 (Literature and Composition I) and ENG 112 (Literature and Composition II)) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 393 - Early Twentieth-Century American Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Representative works of American novelists, poets, and playwrights from 1900 to 1940.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 394 - Mid-Twentieth Century American Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Representative works of prose, drama, and poetry by American writers from 1940 to 1980.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 395 - Contemporary American Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Representative works of American novelists, poets and playwrights since 1980.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 396 - Early Twentieth-Century Drama - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Selected early twentieth-century plays from Ibsen to Pinter.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 397 - International English Literature I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A literary and cultural study of representative international literature in English from 1950 to 1980.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 398 - International English Literature II - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A literary and cultural study of representative international literature in English since 1980.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 399 - Classics of Children's Literature in English - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This critical survey of children's classics examines a variety of genres and introduces students to the development of children's literature.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 401 - Special Topics in English Literature: The Romance from Sir Gawain to Harlequin - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This senior seminar allows third- or fourth-year English students the opportunity to study in greater depth specific authors, genres, historical periods, or literary issues.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Prerequisites: English (12SR) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 402 - Special Topics in English Literature: The Novels of Edith Wharton - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This senior seminar allows third- and fourth-year English students the opportunity to study in greater depth specific authors, genres, historical periods, or literary issues.

Prerequisites: English (12SR) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 403 - Special Topics in English Literature: Women Novelists of the Eighteenth Century - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This senior seminar allows third- or fourth-year English students the opportunity to study in greater depth specific authors, genres, historical periods, or literary issues.

Prerequisites: English (12SR) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 404 - Special Topics in English Literature: The World of Charles Dickens - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This senior seminar allows third- or fourth-year English students the opportunity to study in greater depth specific authors, genres, historical periods, or literary issues.

Prerequisites: English (12SR) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 405 - Special Topics in English Literature: European Literature in the Middle Ages - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This senior seminar allows third- and fourth-year English students the opportunity to study in greater depth specific authors, genres, historical periods, or literary issues.

Prerequisites: English (12SR) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 406 - Special Topics in English Literature: Renaissance Drama, Excluding Shakespeare - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This senior seminar allows third- and fourth-year English students the opportunity to study in greater depth specific authors, genres, historical periods, or literary issues.

Prerequisites: English (12SR) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 407 - Special Topics in English Literature: Introduction to James Joyce's Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course will involve close textual readings of Joyce's first two major works: a brilliant collection of 15 stories concerned with Joyce's view of the paralysis of Irish society and his autobiographical first novel.

Prerequisites: English (12SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 480 - Independent Studies - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

In consultation with members of the English Department, the student will undertake an independent study of an approved topic. A student must first secure approval for his or her topic from both a supervising professor and the Department Chair before being permitted to register for this course.

Prerequisites: English (12SR) and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 491 - Literary Criticism I - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A seminar in literary theory and applied criticism. Students will survey primarily a variety of traditional critical approaches to the middle of the twentieth century, and apply some of these approaches to selected texts.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENG 491 (Literary Criticism I) or ENG 490

Prerequisites: English (6SR) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENG 492 - Literary Criticism II - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A seminar in literary theory and applied criticism. Students will survey primarily a variety of twentieth-century and contemporary approaches, and apply some of these approaches to selected texts.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENG 492 (Literary Criticism II) or ENG 490

Prerequisites: English (6SR) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Environmental Health (After Degree)

ENVH501 - Environmental Management I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An overview of the health concerns relating to our air and waste management systems. Topics include air toxins and pollutants; management methods for ambient and indoor air quality; soil chemistry; management of contaminated sites; waste management methods.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Prerequisites: Chemistry (3SR) and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: 3 credits of general microbiology.

ENVH502 - Environmental Management II - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An overview of the health concerns related to our water and sewage systems. Topics include identification of chemical and bacterial hazards; risk management of public and private water supplies; source protection and pollution concerns for ground and surface water; water quality for recreational water; municipal and private sewage treatment systems and their relationship to water quality.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Prerequisites: ENVH501 (Environmental Management I)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH503 - Environmental Management III - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An overview of the public health concerns relating to solid and liquid waste management systems. A review of the solid waste disposal system will include municipal waste systems, biomedical waste, composting, and incineration. Liquid waste management will include discussions on municipal wastewater treatment and private liquid waste disposal. Focus on pollution and operational problems associated with these management facilities and to introduce students to water reuse, wastewater reclamation and waste minimization. Graduates will be able to: interpret occupational health and safety legislation, develop OHS/Loss-Control Programs, conduct audits and inspections of existing OHS and environmental programs, and design and deliver effective OHS training programs for workers.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Prerequisites: Chemistry (6) and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: 3 credits of general microbiology.

ENVH511 - Health Risk Assessment I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Basic risk assessment and management principles and the application of risk assessment processes in the public and environmental health fields. Topics include hazard identification, dose-response determination, and exposure and site assessment.

Note: CH 211 is recommended as a prerequisite.
Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department

Prerequisites: Chemistry (3SR) and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: 3 credits of human or mammalian physiology

ENVH512 - Environmental Management III - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An overview of the public health concerns relating to solid and liquid waste management systems. A review of the solid waste disposal system will include municipal waste systems, biomedical waste, composting, and incineration. Liquid waste management will include discussions on municipal wastewater treatment and private liquid waste disposal. Focus on pollution and operational problems associated with these management facilities and to introduce students to water reuse, wastewater reclamation and waste minimization. Graduates will be able to: interpret occupational health and safety legislation, develop OHS/Loss-Control Programs, conduct audits and inspections of existing OHS and environmental programs, and design and deliver effective OHS training programs for workers.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Prerequisites: ENVH511 (Health Risk Assessment I)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH513 - Environmental and Public Health Law - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

The key elements of municipal, provincial, and federal legislation designed to protect the environment and human health. Special emphasis on those areas that public health officials are likely to encounter in discharging their duties. Topics include the process by which legislation is drafted, passed, and reviewed by the three levels of government.
Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH521 - Methodologies in Environmental Health Practice I - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to investigative principles and protocols as they apply to environmental health. Students develop and apply models for inspection, investigation, and risk analysis. Case scenarios include evaluation of food establishments, personal care facilities, housing, aquatic facilities, insect and vermin control, communicable disease control, nuisances and general sanitation. Principles are applied through visits to premises and the preparation of professional reports linking theory to practice.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH522 - Methodologies in Environmental Health Practice II - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

An exploration of advanced investigative protocols as they apply to environmental health. Students develop and apply models for inspection, investigation, and risk analysis. Case scenarios include evaluation of occupational health issues, emergency preparedness planning, and institutional and industrial practices. Principles are applied through visits to premises and the preparation of professional reports linking theory to practice.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Prerequisites: ENVH521 (Methodologies in Environmental Health Practice I)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH523 - Ethical Issues in Environmental Health - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Addresses areas of current interest in environmental and occupational health that raise significant ethical issues, such as professional codes of conduct, the right to know, genetic screening in the workplace, and cost-benefit analysis in standard setting. Increases awareness of the ethical dilemmas in the field and provides a framework for analysis and decision making when confronted with ethical issues.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH533 - Health Promotion and Environmental Health Education - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Examination of the changing concepts of health promotion and health-promoting behaviour, population health, and health determinants from a health practitioner's perspective. Education materials, print materials, and teaching experiences will be prepared and practised with particular emphasis on community development and action. Principles of educational programming, advertising, and marketing will be explored.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH543 - Public Health Administration and Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

The nature, principles and global development of public health. The development of the Canadian health system as well as its organization, financing, and delivery of public health services are examined. The role of the environmental health practitioner within policy development and analysis is investigated and practised. Applications of management practices to public health issues are introduced.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH551 - Communicable Disease Control - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

The natural history of significant human pathogens and the measures public health officials take to control them. Topics include enteric, respiratory, sexually transmitted, blood-borne, and travel-related diseases. Emerging pathogens are discussed. The role of infection control, outbreak investigation, and vaccinations are presented.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: 3 credits of general microbiology.

ENVH552 - Epidemiology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Overview of the epidemiological methods used to identify and control the outbreak of human diseases. Emphasis is on the study of diseases important to public health in Canada. Epidemiology is then applied to the evaluation of health services.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: 3 credits of statistics

ENVH553 - Environmental Microbiology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

The ecology of specific natural and man-made environments, microbiological information, and the public health significance of the organisms present in these environments. Discussion about the survival, dissemination, impact, and control of specific microorganisms in the environment with a particular focus on the supply, processing, and storage of food and food products. Discussion of water, waste water, and air microbiology.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: 3 credits of general microbiology.

ENVH556 - Environmental Chemistry - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Basic chemical principles of equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and reaction types to develop an understanding of the complex interactions that occur in environmental pollution. Illustrations applicable to chemical and toxicological aspects of environmental issues such as primary and secondary air pollutants, water quality, persistent bioaccumulative pollutants, and toxic metal contamination. This course will provide an appreciation of the analytical methodologies and quantitative aspects of assessing chemical contamination to provide an ability to critique and interpret environmental studies, reports, and literature.

Note: Organic Chemistry or Introductory Environmental Chemistry is recommended as a prerequisite.
Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Prerequisites: Chemistry (3SR)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH557 - Environmental Toxicology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Introduction to the principles governing toxicity including the significance of entry route, dosage, tissue distribution, time course, metabolism, excretion, cellular action, host susceptibility factors, and assays. The ability to critique and interpret data will be emphasized.

Note: Organic Chemistry or Introductory Environmental Chemistry is recommended.
Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENVH557 (Environmental Toxicology) or BIO 352 (Toxicology) or ENSC350 (Environmental Toxicology)

Prerequisites: Chemistry (3SR)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH559 - Environmental Health Communications - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

A collection of professional development seminars and activities relevant to the practice of environmental public health including determinants of health, professional writing, communications training, critical appraisal of public health research, and an introduction to healthcare computer networks, data management structures and application software.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH561 - Field Experience in Public Health Inspection - 12 (0-0-0)
Faculty of Science

A twelve-week field experience working under the direction of a supervising public health inspector or environmental health officer in selected community or public health agencies. This is the recommended course for students wishing to pursue national certification as a public health inspector or environmental health officer through the Board of Certification of the Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENVH561 (Field Experience in Public Health Inspection) or ENVH571 (Applied Research Project in Health Sciences)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Satisfactory completion of all course work.

ENVH571 - Applied Research Project in Health Sciences - 12 (0-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An applied research opportunity in association with a community or public health agency, private industry, a public or private laboratory, an occupational health and safety department, or other non-public health setting related to environmental health. A major research paper will be prepared to report the findings.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Environmental Health (After Degree) program or with permission of the Department.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENVH571 (Applied Research Project in Health Sciences) or ENVH561 (Field Experience in Public Health Inspection)

Prerequisites: Consent of Department and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Satisfactory completion of all course work.

Environmental Health (Graduate Studies)

ENVH601 - Environmental Management I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An overview of the health concerns related to our air and waste management systems. Topics include air toxins and pollutants, management methods for ambient and indoor air quality, soil chemistry, management of contaminated sites, and waste management methods.
Note: Open to students in the Graduate Diploma in Environmental Public Health Practice or by permission of the department.

Prerequisites: Chemistry (6) and BIO 265 (General Microbiology)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH602 - Environmental Management II - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An overview of the health concerns relating to our drinking and recreational water. Focus will be on the identification of chemical and bacterial hazards, and the risk management of public and private water supplies. Source protection and pollution concerns for ground and surface water; and water quality issues for recreational water and swimming pool water will be discussed. There will also be discussions on waterborne pathogens and procedures for declaring a Boil Water Advisory.
Note: Open to students in the Graduate Diploma in Environmental Public Health Practice or by permission of the department.

Prerequisites: Chemistry (6) and BIO 265 (General Microbiology)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH611 - Health Risk Assessment - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Basic risk assessment and management principles and the application of risk
assessment processes in the public and environmental health fields. Topics include hazard identification, dose-response determination, and exposure and site assessment.
Note: Open to students in the Graduate Diploma in Environmental Public Health Practice or by permission of the department.

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH612 - Environmental Management III - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An overview of the public health concerns relating to solid and liquid waste management systems. A review of the solid waste disposal system will include municipal waste systems, biomedical waste, composting, and incineration. Liquid waste management will include discussions on municipal wastewater treatment and private liquid waste disposal. Focus on pollution and operational problems associated with these management facilities and to introduce students to water reuse, wastewater reclamation and waste minimization. Graduates will be able to: interpret occupational health and safety legislation, develop OHS/Loss-Control Programs, conduct audits and inspections of existing OHS and environmental programs, and design and deliver effective OHS training programs for workers.
Note: Open to students in the Graduate Diploma in Environmental Public Health Practice or by permission of the department.

Prerequisites: Chemistry (6) and BIO 265 (General Microbiology)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH621 - Environmental Health Practice I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to investigative principles and protocols as they apply to
environmental health. Students develop and apply models for inspection, investigation, and risk analysis. Case scenarios include evaluation of food establishments, personal care facilities, housing, insect and vermin control, communicable disease control, nuisances and general sanitation. Principles are applied through visits to premises and the preparation of professional reports linking theory to practice.
Note: Open to students in the Graduate Diploma in Environmental Public Health Practice or by permission of the department.

Further information: Course availability and times

ENVH622 - Environmental Health Practice II - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An exploration of advanced investigative protocols as they apply to environmental
health. Students develop and apply models for inspection, investigation, risk analysis, and risk management. Case scenarios include evaluation of agricultural facilities, child care facilities, adult care facilities, recreational water/public beaches, swimming pools and other aquatic facilities, work camps, emergency response, outbreak investigation and management as well as surveillance and Notifiable Disease follow-up. Principles are applied through lectures, table-top exercises, visits to premises and the preparation of professional reports linking theory to practice.
Note: Open to students in the Graduate Diploma in Environmental Public Health Practice or by permission of the department.

Further information: Course availability and times

Environmental Science

ENSC101 - Introduction to Environmental Studies - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to environmental studies including perspectives from the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to environmental studies using laboratory exercises, field trips, and class discussions. This course will survey a variety of topics including pollution, biodiversity, fossil fuels, recycling, land degradation and agriculture, and human population dynamics.

Note: May not be used for credit toward a Biology or Environmental Science major, concentration, or minor.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC101 (Introduction to Environmental Studies) or BES 203 or BES 204 or ENSC204 (Environmental Science: Problems and Solutions)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC204 - Environmental Science: Problems and Solutions - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

A survey of the nature and characteristics of the major environmental issues prevalent in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Discussions concentrate on the causes of and solutions to these problems.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC204 (Environmental Science: Problems and Solutions) or ENSC101 (Introduction to Environmental Studies)

Prerequisites: BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and Chemistry (3) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC208 - Principles of Ecology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

A comprehensive survey of general ecology concepts that can stand alone or serve as preparation for advanced ecology courses. Labs emphasize the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from ecological experiments and field studies to illustrate and complement the lecture material.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC208 (Principles of Ecology) or BES 208 or BIO 208 (Principles of Ecology)

Prerequisites: BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC210 - Flora and Fauna of Alberta - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

The identification, distribution, habits, and life histories of the aquatic and terrestrial macro flora and fauna of Alberta. Factors affecting local variation are discussed. Collection methods, estimation of population size, and identifying the age of organisms are among the topics covered in the labs.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC210 (Flora and Fauna of Alberta) or BES 210 or BIO 211 (Flora and Fauna of Alberta)

Prerequisites: BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC215 - Behavioural Ecology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Animal behaviour from an ecological and physiological perspective.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC215 (Behavioural Ecology) or BES 215 or BIO 215 (Behavioural Ecology)

Prerequisites: BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC220 - Soil Science - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

The formation, classification, composition, and conservation of soils with an emphasis on the soils of Alberta. Chemical and physical properties affecting plant growth and nutrition are studied.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC220 (Soil Science) or BES 220 or BIO 220 (Soil Science)

Prerequisites: BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC225 - Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Comparative anatomy of the vertebrates with special emphasis on mammals, including humans.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC225 (Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates) or BIO 225 (Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates)

Prerequisites: BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC227 - Science Communication - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

This course covers all aspects of science communication, including communication with peers, the public, the media, industry and government. Emphasis is placed on experimental data design, data analysis, interpretation and presentation. Students will gain practical experience in processing and presenting results of research. Oral presentation skills will allow students to develop their communication skills, and examination of published research will help the students develop their laboratory report writing skills in the sciences.

Note: This course is only open to Science students (in a science major, concentration or minor).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC227 (Science Communication) or BES 227 or BIO 227 (Science Communication)

Prerequisites: Biochemistry (3) or Biology (3) or Biology/Environmental Science (3) or Chemistry (3) or Computing Science (3) or Earth Science (3) or Environmental Science (3) or Information Science (3) or Information Technology (3) or Mathematics (3) or Physics (3) and 2nd year standing required or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: 3 credits of Science and 2nd year standing required

ENSC243 - Animal Physiology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Functional biology at the organ-system level. Emphasis on vertebrate physiology, including humans.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC243 (Animal Physiology) or BIO 243 (Animal Physiology)

Prerequisites: BES 107 (Introduction to Cell Biology) and Chemistry (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC245 - Plant Physiology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

An introductory course on water and energy relations in vascular plants, evapotranspiration, mineral nutrition, membrane transport, ascent of water, translocation, net carbon assimilation, growth, development, hormone action, and water stress.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC245 (Plant Physiology) or BIO 245 (Plant Physiology)

Prerequisites: BES 107 (Introduction to Cell Biology) and Chemistry (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC250 - Survey of the Invertebrates - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

A lecture and laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with the major invertebrate taxa. Emphasizes functional anatomy and life cycles.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC250 (Survey of the Invertebrates) or BES 250 or BIO 250 (Survey of the Invertebrates)

Prerequisites: BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC265 - General Microbiology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Physiology, metabolism, and replication of bacteria and eukaryotic organisms. Gene regulation in bacteria. Ecology and interrelationships of microorganisms; biotechnology and industrial microbiology. Laboratories focus on the identification of microorganisms using biochemical and molecular biological criteria.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC265 (General Microbiology) or BIO 265 (General Microbiology)

Prerequisites: BES 107 (Introduction to Cell Biology) and BES 108 (Organisms in Their Environment) and 2nd year standing required

Corequisites: BIO 207 (Molecular Genetics and Heredity) or BIOCH200 (Introductory Biochemistry)

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC305 - Aquatic Biology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to the structure and functioning of freshwater ecosystems with emphasis on the biological, chemical and physical processes that affect organismal distribution, abundance, life cycles, adaptations, and the ecological roles that organisms have in aquatic ecosystems. Environmental problems resulting from human disturbances to aquatic ecosystems are examined. The lab portion of this course provides students with hands-on experience in sampling, analyzing and interpreting features of lake, wetland and stream ecosystems.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC305 (Aquatic Biology) or BES 304 or BIO 304 (Aquatic Biology)

Prerequisites: BES 208 or BIO 208 (Principles of Ecology) or ENSC208 (Principles of Ecology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC308 - Population and Community Ecology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Principles of population and community ecology as they apply to plants and animals; population consequences of variation among individuals; habitat structure and population structure; habitat selection and foraging theory; life tables, demography, and the evolution of life history patterns; population dynamics and population regulation; ecological succession; classification and ordination of communities; application of molecular biology to the study of populations, mating systems and forensics.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC308 (Population and Community Ecology) or BES 308 or BIO 308 (Population and Community Ecology)

Prerequisites: BES 208 or BIO 208 (Principles of Ecology) or ENSC208 (Principles of Ecology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC318 - Field Ecology in Alberta - 3 (0-1s-5)
Faculty of Science

This is a field course designed to be taken during the summer following either the second or third year of studies. Field investigations provide the student with experience analyzing the features of various terrestrial and aquatic habitats throughout Alberta, and allow them to evaluate the potential effects of human activity in those environments.

Note: In addition to the regular tuition and lab fees, there is a special fee to cover transportation, accommodation, and shared meals.

Prerequisites: BES 208 or BIO 208 (Principles of Ecology) or ENSC208 (Principles of Ecology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC319 - Field Course in Marine, Freshwater and Terrestrial Ecosystems - 3 (0-1s-5)
Faculty of Science

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop practical skills in environmental monitoring, assessment, and management practices as they apply to global environmental issues. Projects focus on environmental quality, impact assessment, habitat structure, biodiversity and sustainability. This course is designed to be taken during the year (summer or Christmas break) following the second or third year of studies. Field exercises are conducted at an area outside of Alberta, with the destination to be decided each year.

Note: The destination will be announced before the beginning of Fall semester, and interested students should apply to the Department Chair. Tuition and all fees (normally non-refundable) must be paid one month before departing on the course, including an additional fee charged to cover the costs of transportation, accommodation and other course-related activities. This fee will depend on the destination, since the course will be run only on a cost-recovery basis.

Prerequisites: BES 208 or BIO 208 (Principles of Ecology) or ENSC208 (Principles of Ecology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC335 - Work Experience - 3 (0-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Senior Environmental Science students may receive credit for practical experience obtained outside the classroom in the work environment. Students who are considering taking this course must first apply to the Department Chair for permission to have previous work experience evaluated for credit.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC335 (Work Experience) or BIO 330 (Work Experience)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC339 - Conservation Biology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to the principles and methods of conservation biology that focuses on the global and regional patterns of biological diversity, ecological processes underlying those patterns, threats to global biological diversity, and solutions to dealing with those threats.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC339 (Conservation Biology) or BES 339 or BIO 339 (Conservation Biology)

Prerequisites: BES 208 or BIO 208 (Principles of Ecology) or ENSC208 (Principles of Ecology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC346 - Environmental Physiology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

The understanding of the effect of environmental variables (both natural and anthropogenic) on the functioning of a variety of organisms.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC346 (Environmental Physiology) or BIO 346 (Environmental Physiology)

Prerequisites: (BIO 243 (Animal Physiology) or ENSC243 (Animal Physiology)) and (BIO 245 (Plant Physiology) or ENSC245 (Plant Physiology)) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC350 - Environmental Toxicology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Basic concepts of toxicology and the ways in which they apply to selected plant and animal systems. Laboratories focus on specific examples of bioessays, standard methods of data collection, analysis, and interpretation.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC350 (Environmental Toxicology) or BIO 352 (Toxicology) or ENVH557 (Environmental Toxicology)

Prerequisites: (Biology (3SR) or Environmental Science (3SR) ) and Chemistry (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC354 - Parasitology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

Parasitology is the scientific study of the biological relationship known as parasitism. This course is a survey of parasites of human and animals, using selected taxa to illustrate the parasite/host adaptation with respect to their morphology, physiology, behaviour, life history, and ecology. Based on this basic knowledge, discussion will focus on the occurrence, symptomatology, pathogenesis, epidemiology and control of representative parasitic diseases of human and animals. Laboratories will provide opportunities for students to study specimen and samples of important taxa of parasites, as well as to conduct experiments to explore parasitic relationships and life histories.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC354 (Parasitology) or BIO 350 (Parasitology)

Prerequisites: Biology (3SR) or Environmental Science (3SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC355 - Environmental Policy - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Processes in government, industry and non-government organizations aimed at developing and implementing environmental policy. Special emphasis on those areas that government, industry, environmental managers and researchers are likely to encounter in performance of their work. Includes the process by which Canadian legislation is written, passed and reviewed. Policies dealing with transboundary issues are reviewed.

Prerequisites: ENSC204 (Environmental Science: Problems and Solutions) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC415 - Risk Assessment - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

Basic risk assessment and risk management principles and the application of risk assessment and environmental assessment processes. Topics include hazard identification, dose-response determination, risk analysis and perception, and exposure and site assessment. Practical application of risk assessment and management principles will be discussed, with hands-on, practical experience in evaluating risk and in communicating risk to industry, government, environmental groups, and the general public.

Note: BIO 352 or ENSC350 is recommended as a prerequisite.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC415 (Risk Assessment) or BIO 415 (Risk Assessment)

Prerequisites: (Biology (3SR) or Environmental Science (3SR) ) and Chemistry (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC430 - Environmental Remediation - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

A review of the current principles of environmental remediation. Hydrogeology, waste management, soil science and reclamation, air and water management, and oil and gas development will be among the topics covered.

Prerequisites: (BES 208 or BIO 208 (Principles of Ecology) or ENSC208 (Principles of Ecology)) and (BES 304 or BIO 304 (Aquatic Biology) or ENSC305 (Aquatic Biology)) and 2nd year standing required and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: 3 credits of 300-level Environmental Science

ENSC455 - Independent Study - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Science

A senior course designed to permit students to receive credit for independent study under the guidance of a faculty member. Students wishing to enrol in this course should discuss their proposed area of study with the Department Chair who will, in consultation with the appropriate faculty member, decide if the student has permission to enrol in the course.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC475 - Senior Seminar in Environmental Science - 3 (0-2s-0)
Faculty of Science

A course designed to introduce students to special topics not covered in other courses in the Department. Guest lectures will be featured and students will present seminars.

Note: Open to Environmental Science majors in the third or fourth year of the program.

Prerequisites: Environmental Science (9) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC485 - Advanced Research Methods - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Critical examination of research methods in Environmental Science, including both lab and field techniques and safety considerations. Design of a research project and development of a grant proposal. Development of research budgets, ordering equipment and supplies, principles of laboratory design, record keeping, and research project management. The ethics and legalities of research, including Canadian Intellectual Property law.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ENSC485 (Advanced Research Methods) or BIO 480 (Advanced Research Methods)

Prerequisites: (BES 227 or BIO 227 (Science Communication) or ENSC227 (Science Communication)) and ENSC204 (Environmental Science: Problems and Solutions) and MAT 151 (Introduction to Statistical Methods) and Environmental Science (9SR) and Chemistry (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC493 - Independent Research I - 3 (0-0-3)
Faculty of Science

An independent research project on current topics in Environmental Science. Before starting the research, projects must be approved by the instructor.

Note: Students in the three-year program may enrol with permission.

Prerequisites: ENSC485 (Advanced Research Methods) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

ENSC495 - Independent Research II - 3 (0-0-3)
Faculty of Science

A continuation of ENSC493, this is a capstone course involving an independent research project on current topics in Environmental Science. Oral communication, laboratory, and library research techniques are emphasized.

Prerequisites: ENSC493 (Independent Research I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Finance

FIN 201 - Corporate Finance - 3 (3-1s-0)
Faculty of Management

An introductory finance course that discusses the fundamental principles of corporate finance. Topics include financial statement analysis, long-term financial planning, stock and bond valuation, net present value, and discounted cash flows.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FIN 201 (Corporate Finance) or FIN 301

Prerequisites: ACCT101 (Introductory Financial Accounting) and BUS 112 (Business Statistics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FIN 220 - Personal Finance - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

An examination of the knowledge and tools required to manage personal finances and an explanation of the various concepts related to personal finance and wealth management. Topics include financial investments and estate planning, personal taxation, asset management, consumer loans, insurance and investments. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and analysis of financial institutions and strategies.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FIN 310 - Public Finance - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

An examination of public and government finance including best practices, challenges and reforms of budgeting and financial management in the public sector. Students gain an understanding of the government budgeting process including how budgets are formulated; what forces and factors shape government budgets; resource allocation in the public sector; the impact of globalization on budgets and public bodies; and the feasibility of government sector reform initiatives.

Prerequisites: FIN 201 (Corporate Finance) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FIN 315 - Mergers and Acquisitions - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

This course is concerned with determining the fair market value of companies, determining inter-corporate synergies, merging companies and launching friendly and unfriendly takeover bids. Included will be employee Management Buy Outs ("MBOs"), Leverage Buy Outs ("LBO's"), and the issue of securities as a method of acquisition. Legal considerations in Canada and the United States will also be examined.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: FIN 201 (Corporate Finance) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FIN 320 - Investment Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

This course examines the fundamentals of investment and provides students with the tools that they require to both understand and conduct various investment analyses that support responsible decision making. The course covers the nature of investments, investment decisions, investment alternatives, investment funds, securities, markets, risk and return, capital market theory and instrument valuations including common stock and bonds.

Prerequisites: FIN 201 (Corporate Finance) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FIN 325 - Managerial Finance - 3 (3-1s-0)
Faculty of Management

An analysis of the fundamental valuation techniques used in finance. Topics include capital budgeting, risk management, asset and security valuation, and corporate capital structure.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FIN 325 (Managerial Finance) or MGT 325

Prerequisites: FIN 201 (Corporate Finance) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FIN 400 - Financial Institutions - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

An examination of the way in which capital markets function and the pivotal role played by financial institutions. Particular emphasis is placed on the coverage of Canadian markets and institutions, risk management, and risk-return tradeoffs available to investors.

Prerequisites: FIN 201 (Corporate Finance) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FIN 420 - International Business Finance - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

This course develops a broad conceptual framework for making international financial decisions. Topics include purchasing power parity, spot and forward exchange rate fundamentals, and foreign exchange risk. The intent is to provide an effective base of information so that students understand the issues and risks involved in international financial management and have exposure to some of the tools necessary to effectively manage these risks.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FIN 420 (International Business Finance) or FIN 302

Prerequisites: FIN 201 (Corporate Finance) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

French

FR 101 - Beginners' French I - 3 (0-5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

In this beginning-level course, students learn basic French grammatical structures and a wide variety of practical vocabulary, and are introduced to aspects of contemporary francophone culture and civilization. Students gain skills in four main areas: oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.

Note: Not open to students with credit in French 30. Students already fluent in French will not be admitted, at the discretion of the instructor.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 101 (Beginners' French I) or FR 100 or (30-level French or equivalent)

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 102 - Beginners' French II - 3 (0-5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Promotes further competence in spoken and written French, and a greater understanding of francophone culture and civilization.

Note: Not open to students with credit in French 30. Students already fluent in French will not be admitted, at the discretion of the instructor.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 102 (Beginners' French II) or FR 100 or (30-level French or equivalent)

Prerequisites: FR 101 (Beginners' French I) or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: French 20

FR 211 - Intermediate French I - 3 (0-5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course is designed to strengthen students' skills in oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, through study and reinforcement of basic language structures. Students review and increase their command of vocabulary and current idioms, read and discuss short literary texts, and view related audiovisual materials in order to increase reading ability and gain insight into francophone culture.

Note: This course is open to first-year students.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 211 (Intermediate French I) or FR 203

Prerequisites: (30-level French or equivalent) or FR 102 (Beginners' French II)

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 212 - Intermediate French II - 3 (0-5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course is designed to strengthen students' skills in oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, through study and reinforcement of basic language structures. Students review and increase their command of vocabulary and current idioms, read and discuss short literary texts, and view related audiovisual materials in order to increase reading ability and gain insight into francophone culture.

Note: This course is open to first-year students.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 212 (Intermediate French II) or FR 203

Prerequisites: FR 211 (Intermediate French I)

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 251 - Advanced French I - 3 (0-4L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Continued training in the comprehension and production of the spoken and written word, comprising grammar, composition, and literature. The grammatical component of FR 251, along with that of FR 252, covers all the structures which are necessary to know at the undergraduate level.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 251 (Advanced French I) or FR 250

Prerequisites: FR 203 or FR 212 (Intermediate French II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 252 - Advanced French II - 3 (0-4L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Continued training in the comprehension and production of the spoken and written word, comprising grammar, composition, and literature. The grammatical component of FR 252, along with that of FR 251, covers all the structures which are necessary to know at the undergraduate level.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 252 (Advanced French II) or FR 250

Prerequisites: FR 251 (Advanced French I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 300 - Introduction to French Canadian Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to the francophone literature of Canada from its origins to the present day, with an emphasis on the role of literature in the formation and expression of a cultural identity. Some of the works under study are presented in literary format such as a novel, a novella and various short stories; others are shown audiovisually as films. This course offers students the opportunity to participate actively in group discussions in French as well as to develop a good writing style with regards to short essays.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 300 (Introduction to French Canadian Literature) or FR 491 (Advanced French Literary Studies)

Prerequisites: FR 250 or FR 252 (Advanced French II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 303 - Twentieth-Century Francophone Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A useful introduction to literature in French, this course is designed to promote an understanding and appreciation of contemporary francophone literature. It also examines current trends in a constantly evolving language and culture. Conducted entirely in French, it provides students with the opportunity to increase their language skills in all areas, while broadening their cultural knowledge through the study of literature of the modern francophone world.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 303 (Twentieth-Century Francophone Literature) or FR 492 (Advanced French Literary Studies)

Prerequisites: FR 250 or FR 252 (Advanced French II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 311 - French Literature from the Middle Ages to the Seventeenth Century - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

French Literature from its beginnings in medieval times to the end of the seventeenth century, through the study of specific key texts.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Prerequisites: FR 250 or FR 252 (Advanced French II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 312 - French Literature from the Eighteenth Century to the Mid-Twentieth Century - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

French literature from the eighteenth century to the first half of the twentieth century, through the study of works of representative writers of the periods.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 312 (French Literature from the Eighteenth Century to the Mid-Twentieth Century) or FR 493 (Advanced French Literary Studies)

Prerequisites: FR 250 or FR 252 (Advanced French II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 372 - French Phonetics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to French phonetics focusing on the recognition and elimination of pronunciation difficulties for English speakers.

Note: Language of instruction is English.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Corequisites: FR 203

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 390 - Introduction to Children's Literature in French - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A critical and historical survey of children's literature from France and other francophone countries. The reading of works of literature is accompanied by the viewing of relevant audiovisual materials such as films and videos.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 390 (Introduction to Children's Literature in French) or FR 494 (Advanced French Literary Studies)

Prerequisites: FR 250 or FR 252 (Advanced French II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 491 - Advanced French Literary Studies - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students complete FR 300 with additional assignments including a research project arranged with the instructor. A capstone course for French concentrations in the final year of their program.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 491 (Advanced French Literary Studies) or FR 300 (Introduction to French Canadian Literature)

Prerequisites: FR 250 or FR 252 (Advanced French II) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 492 - Advanced French Literary Studies - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students complete FR 303 with additional assignments including a research project arranged with the instructor. A capstone course for French concentrations in the final year of their program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 492 (Advanced French Literary Studies) or FR 303 (Twentieth-Century Francophone Literature)

Prerequisites: FR 250 or FR 252 (Advanced French II) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 493 - Advanced French Literary Studies - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students complete FR 312 with additional assignments including a research project arranged with the instructor. A capstone course for French concentrations in the final year of their program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 493 (Advanced French Literary Studies) or FR 312 (French Literature from the Eighteenth Century to the Mid-Twentieth Century)

Prerequisites: FR 250 or FR 252 (Advanced French II) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

FR 494 - Advanced French Literary Studies - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students complete FR 390 with additional assignments including a research project arranged with the instructor. A capstone course for French concentrations in the final year of their program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of FR 494 (Advanced French Literary Studies) or FR 390 (Introduction to Children's Literature in French)

Prerequisites: FR 250 or FR 252 (Advanced French II) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

German

GERM101 - Beginners' German I - 3 (0-5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

An entry-level course designed to give students a good command of spoken and written German and an introduction to German culture and civilization.

Note: Not open to students who have credit in German 30. Students already fluent in German will not be admitted, at the discretion of the instructor.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of GERM101 (Beginners' German I) or GERM100 or (30-level German or equivalent)

Further information: Course availability and times

GERM102 - Beginners' German II - 3 (0-5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

As a sequel course to GERM101, this course is designed to give students further intensive training in oral and written German. It promotes a greater understanding of German culutre and civilization.

Note: Not open to students who have credit in German 30. Students already fluent in German will not be admitted, at the discretion of the instructor.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of GERM102 (Beginners' German II) or GERM100 or (30-level German or equivalent)

Prerequisites: GERM101 (Beginners' German I)

Further information: Course availability and times

GERM211 - Intermediate German I - 3 (0-5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course will help to increase the students' abilities in reading and writing German and to develop greater skills in speaking the language, with a focus on contemporary issues.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of GERM211 (Intermediate German I) or GERM210

Prerequisites: (30-level German or equivalent) or GERM102 (Beginners' German II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

GERM212 - Intermediate German II - 3 (0-5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course will help to increase the students' abilities in reading and writing German and to develop greater skills in speaking the language, with a focus on contemporary issues.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of GERM212 (Intermediate German II) or GERM210

Prerequisites: GERM211 (Intermediate German I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Graduate Studies

MREG 600 - Maintaining Registration - 3 (0-0-0)

M REG 600 is a special registration designation for graduate students who wish to keep their programs active while they are not working on courses, a research project, or a thesis.

Note: Open only to students in the Graduate programs.

Further information: Course availability and times

THES 712 - Thesis - 12 (0-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The registration designation for full-time work dedicated to the research and writing of the master's thesis in a thesis-based program. Students register in THES 712 if they have completed all of the course work in the master's program.

Note: Open only to students in the Graduate programs.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of THES 712 (Thesis) or THES 706

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Completion of the course work in a master's program.

Greek

GRK 101 - Introductory Classical Greek I - 3 (3-2L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introductory classical Greek, including elements of Greek grammar and reading simple texts.

Note: Not open to students with matriculation credit in Greek.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of GRK 101 (Introductory Classical Greek I) or GRK 100 or (30-level Greek or equivalent)

Further information: Course availability and times

GRK 102 - Introductory Classical Greek II - 3 (3-2L-0)
Faculty of Arts

A continuation of Introductory Classical Greek I.

Note: Not open to students with matriculation credit in Greek.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of GRK 102 (Introductory Classical Greek II) or GRK 100 or (30-level Greek or equivalent)

Prerequisites: GRK 101 (Introductory Classical Greek I)

Further information: Course availability and times

GRK 300 - Greek Authors and Prose Composition - 6 (3-0-2)
Faculty of Arts

Sight translation. Review of Greek forms. More difficult sentences for translation into Greek.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Prerequisites: GRK 101 (Introductory Classical Greek I) and GRK 102 (Introductory Classical Greek II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Hebrew

HEBR101 - Biblical Hebrew I - 3 (3-0-2)
Faculty of Arts

Basic vocabulary and grammar of classical biblical Hebrew and selected readings from the Hebrew Bible.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HEBR101 (Biblical Hebrew I) or HEBR100

Further information: Course availability and times

HEBR102 - Biblical Hebrew II - 3 (3-0-2)
Faculty of Arts

A continuation of the study of basic vocabulary and grammar of classical biblical Hebrew and selected readings from the Hebrew Bible.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HEBR102 (Biblical Hebrew II) or HEBR100

Prerequisites: HEBR101 (Biblical Hebrew I)

Further information: Course availability and times

HEBR301 - Advanced Hebrew Readings I - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students will develop the ability to sight translate the Hebrew of the Old Testament through grammar review and advanced grammar, building vocabulary familiarity, and rapid reading of Hebrew prose narrative.

Prerequisites: HEBR102 (Biblical Hebrew II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HEBR302 - Advanced Hebrew Readings II - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students will further develop their ability to sight translate the Hebrew of the Old Testament through readings in intermediate Hebrew grammar, expanding depth in Hebrew vocabulary and rapid reading in Hebrew poetry.

Prerequisites: HEBR301 (Advanced Hebrew Readings I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

History

HIS 111 - The Early Modern World - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of world history from the fifteenth through the eighteenth century.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HIS 111 (The Early Modern World) or HIS 120

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 112 - The Modern World - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of world history since the beginning of the nineteenth century.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HIS 112 (The Modern World) or HIS 120

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 206 - History of Christianity - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A historical survey of the beliefs and practices of Christianity from the New Testament to modern time.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HIS 206 (History of Christianity) or REL 248 (The Christian Tradition)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 207 - Europe in the Central Middle Ages - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of Western European history from Charlemagne through the twelfth century. Topics include Romans, Christians and Franks, the Carolingian renewal, Vikings, the agricultural revolution, kings and emperors, economy of manor and town, religious reforms and crusades, and the growth of feudal monarchies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HIS 207 (Europe in the Central Middle Ages) or HIS 200

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 208 - Europe in the Later Middle Ages - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of Western European history from 1200 to 1500. Topics include universities and scholasticism, styles of art and literature, the Black Death, growth of trade and capitalism, the evolution of city-states and monarchies, Hundred Years War, and the changes in church institutions and forms of religious expression.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HIS 208 (Europe in the Later Middle Ages) or HIS 200

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 212 - The Renaissance - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the Renaissance with emphasis on Italy from about 1350 to 1550.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HIS 212 (The Renaissance) or HIS 211

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 213 - The Sixteenth Century - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the major historical movements and leading figures in Europe at the time of the Reformation and the religious wars.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HIS 213 (The Sixteenth Century) or HIS 211

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 218 - Late Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union (1762-1991) - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The history of the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union from the reign of Catherine the Great to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Topics include Russia's attempts to reform its social and economic backwardness, the development of the Stalinist system, and internal politics under Khrushchev, Brezhnev, and Gorbachev.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 221 - Rebellions and Revolutions - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Rebellions and revolutions have occurred throughout human history and have resulted in major changes in political, social, economic and cultural institutions. This course is a comparative analysis of the events and ideas that have motivated important rebellions and revolutions in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 250 - American History to 1865 - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Surveys the major historical episodes of the American nation before the end of the Civil War. Emphasizes the factual aspects of that period; introduces the interpretive dimensions of historical events where appropriate.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 251 - American History Since 1865 - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Surveys the major historical episodes of America from the end of the Civil War to the present. Emphasizes the factual aspects of that period; introduces the interpretive dimensions of historical events where appropriate.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 260 - Canadian History 1500-1867 - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduces the major political, economic, social, and cultural themes of pre-Confederation Canadian historical development.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 261 - Canadian History 1867-Present - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduces the major political, economic, social, and cultural themes of post-Confederation Canadian historical development.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 290 - Introduction to Historical Research Methods - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course will introduce students to the practical aspects of historical research methods and the writing of history. Students will learn how to formulate a research question, how to work with historical sources, and how to write and present historical research.

Note: Open to first-year students.

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 301 - Special Topics in History: Ethnic Cleansing and Genocide in the Twentieth Century - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course is intended to introduce students to events of genocide and ethnic cleansing in the 20th century. More specifically, the course will examine: 1) the legal, historical and contested definitions of what constitutes a "genocide"; and 2) which horrific events in the 20th century should be treated by historians as "genocides". The course will also enable students to compare and contrast these historical events to see whether there are any common characteristics that help to define what constitutes a genocide.

Note: This course is part of the HIS 300 Series: Special Topics in History.

Prerequisites: History (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 302 - Special Topics in History: History at the Movies - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This lecture or seminar allows students the opportunity to study in greater depth a particular historical period, theme, or issue. The specific topics will vary from year to year. This course may be taken as part of a series of history courses in different topics with permission of the Department Chair.

Note: This course is part of the HIS 300 Series: Special Topics in History.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 309 - Luther and the Reformation - 3 (2-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A critical study of Luther, his theology, and impact on the Reformation.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HIS 309 (Luther and the Reformation) or REL 359 (Theology of Luther)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 315 - From Discord to Concord: Europe in the Late 20th Century - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The history of Europe after World War II. Topics include post-war reconstruction and the Cold War, the European Economic Community, Europe's role in the United Nations and NATO, the fall of communism, the reunification of Europe, neo-fascist movements, and the threat of terrorism.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 333 - Europe in the Age of Totalitarianism - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The major political and social developments that led to the rise and fall of twentieth-century totalitarian regimes in Germany, Italy, Eastern Europe, and the Soviet Union. Topics include the strategies and ideologies employed by dictatorships, and their usage of violence, surveillance, and consensus-building.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 340 - Light on Europe in the "Dark Ages" - 3 (2-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Often referred to as the "Dark Ages", the period from c. 400 to c. 1000 was the period in which the Roman world was transformed into its three "heirs" that have defined the history of the West ever since: the Byzantine Empire (Eastern Europe), Western Christendom, and Islamic civilizations. This course will evaluate the transformation of late antiquity and the rise of Western Christendom in the early Middle Ages, focusing especially on the relationship between the Christian church and society.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HIS 340 (Light on Europe in the "Dark Ages") or BCS 540 (The Rise of Western Christendom) or REL 340 (The Rise of Western Christendom)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 355 - The History of Science from the Scientific Revolution to the Present Day - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the history of science from the Scientific Revolution to the present day. Topics include the Scientific Revolution; the progress of scientific thinking in Portugal, Spain, Italy, England, France, Scotland, the Netherlands, and Sweden to 1800; the evolution of Chemistry; theories on the origins of the earth; the role of the scientific academies; the emergence of the professional scientist; Darwin, evolution, and Social Darwinism; eugenics and heredity; the crisis between science and religion; the development of physics as a discipline; medicine in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth century; biology and race; science and women; and big science.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HIS 355 (The History of Science from the Scientific Revolution to the Present Day) or HIS 351

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 365 - The Canadian West to 1885 - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A course emphasizing Aboriginal life, the fur trade, missions, and European colonization to 1885.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 366 - The Canadian West Since 1885 - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the major political, economic, social, and cultural developments in western Canada since 1885, and their shaping of the region's identity.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 369 - Indigenous Peoples and Canada since 1800 - 3 (2-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A course exploring the experiences of Indigenous Peoples and their relationship with Canadian society over the last two-hundred years. Topics include commercial and military alliances between Europeans and Indigenous Peoples, Treaties, the Indian Act, Residential Schools, the 'Red Power' movement, Aboriginal Activism, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 370 - Christianity and Indigenous Peoples in Canada - 3 (2-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A course surveying the interaction between Indigenous Peoples and Christianity in Canada over the last several hundred years. Key themes discussed are the relationship between colonialism and Christianity, as well as Indigenous expressions of Christianity.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 410 - The Craft of History - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

The capstone learning experience for history concentrations. Method, interpretation, and the problems that historians face in practising the craft of history.

Prerequisites: HIS 290 (Introduction to Historical Research Methods) and History (18) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 415 - Public History - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A historiographical workshop on the practical application of theory and the implications of often very casual decisions about method or medium or management. An issues-oriented course to be taken in conjunction with HIS 416, a field placement for students.

Note: History concentrations preferred.

Prerequisites: History (12) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

HIS 416 - Public History Field Placement - 3 (0-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A practicum or field experience for students at a museum, archives, or historic site operated by Alberta Community Development. To be taken in conjunction with HIS 415. Provides an ongoing grounding in research, writing, and critical analysis.

Note: History concentrations preferred.

Prerequisites: HIS 415 (Public History) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

Human Resource Management

HRM 220 - Introduction to Human Resource Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

An introduction to the roles and functions of human resource management. The course takes the perspective that human resource management plays an important and growing role in the effectiveness and success of organizations and is a shared responsibility of the human resource department and the organization's managers.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HRM 310 - Supervision and Conflict Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

Students will be exposed to traditional and contemporary supervisory models, and challenged to embrace new perspectives and techniques for building employee engagement, enhancing employee productivity, and communicating effectively in the workplace. They will learn how they can infuse vitality through their approach to staffing, motivating and appraising employees, as well as their knowledge of workplace diversity and supervising global teams. Through practical demonstrations and practice sessions, students will learn new skills and gain confidence in their ability to manage conflict effectively, to build high performance teams, and to share these skills with other supervisors and managers.

Prerequisites: HRM 220 (Introduction to Human Resource Management) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HRM 321 - Staffing and Recruitment - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

The concept of staffing strategy is increasing exponentially in importance. Organizations, to attract and retain excellent employees, are developing future oriented staffing models. These models take the form of staffing attraction strategies, staffing support systems, core-staffing systems, and staffing systems and retention management. This course examines the importance of staffing for organizational effectiveness and key staffing strategy decisions regarding staffing levels and staffing quality.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HRM 321 (Staffing and Recruitment) or MGT 426

Prerequisites: HRM 220 (Introduction to Human Resource Management) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HRM 323 - Current Issues in Human Resource Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

Examines the development and implementation of human resource management policies and practices that facilitate organizational effectiveness and success. As background for the identification of these policies and practices, current trends and issues as well as their potential implications are discussed.

Prerequisites: HRM 220 (Introduction to Human Resource Management) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HRM 326 - Employee and Labour Relations - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

In this course, students will gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of employee and labour relations in Canada. Topics include evolution of labour movements and employment legislations, labour-management relationships, challenges of employee and labour relations as well as practical perspectives and contemporary alternatives for resolving employee and labour relations issues.

Prerequisites: HRM 220 (Introduction to Human Resource Management) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HRM 327 - Organizational Learning, Training, and Development - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

In this course, students will examine individual and organizational strategies designed to stimulate learning in organizations. More specifically, students will learn concepts, theories, and practical issues associated with the assessment, development, implementation, and evaluation of training and development systems within organizations.

Prerequisites: HRM 220 (Introduction to Human Resource Management) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HRM 400 - Negotiation and Mediation - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

In this course, students will be introduced to negotiation and mediation skills with an emphasis on their application to managing conflict in the workplace. Students will learn how to prepare for a negotiation or mediation and how to shift themselves and others from positional bargaining to an interest-based conversation. Through practical demonstration and practice sessions, students will work through conflict scenarios.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HRM 400 (Negotiation and Mediation) or MGT 425

Prerequisites: HRM 220 (Introduction to Human Resource Management) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HRM 420 - Compensation System Design and Implementation - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

Compensation systems affect an organization's ability to attract and retain productive employees. They also can affect performance and employee loyalty. The objective of this course is to help students understand the various components and elements of compensation systems so they can develop and implement compensation systems that are capable of facilitating and supporting organizational performance and effectiveness.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HRM 420 (Compensation System Design and Implementation) or HRM 325

Prerequisites: HRM 220 (Introduction to Human Resource Management) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HRM 424 - Comparative Industrial Relations - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

An analysis of the industrial relations practices in a number of industrially-developed market economies compared to those in Canada and the United States. The course includes a review of the social, political, and economic state of the countries, as well as an examination of key events prompting their current collective bargaining practices. The roles of unions, management, and governments are examined as they respond to social and economic forces common to industrialized market economies.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of HRM 424 (Comparative Industrial Relations) or HRM 324

Prerequisites: HRM 220 (Introduction to Human Resource Management) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

HRM 480 - Strategic Human Resource Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

In this course, students will study the design and impact of strategic human resource management on organizational productivity, effectiveness, and sustainable competitive advantage. More specifically, students will examine factors and issues in: organizations' alignment of corporate and human resource strategies; the strategic role of human resource management in executive decision-making; the design, development, execution, and evaluation of HR strategies; and the philosophies and approaches to strategic and effective human resource management in various organizational structures and settings.

Prerequisites: Human Resource Management (6SR) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Indigenous Studies

INDG 111 - Contemporary Perspectives on Indigenous Canada - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the major issues and themes shaping Indigenous peoples in Canada today.

Further information: Course availability and times

Information Systems Assurance Management

ISAM512 - Financial Accounting and Analysis for Information Systems Auditors - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

This course provides aspiring information systems auditors with a rigorous discussion of core concepts of financial accounting, how accounting information is used in the organizational decision making and governance process, the importance of financial statements, as well as how to analyze and interpret financial statements using ratio and variance analysis.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management degree program.

Prerequisites: ISSM542 (Financial Accounting) or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: At least one undergraduate financial accounting course.

ISAM521 - Information Systems Audit I - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

This course provides a comprehensive discussion of the processes involved in conducting an information systems audit using a risk-based approach.

Note: This course is a prerequisite for ISAM 522 as it lays the foundation for further discussion of information systems audits.
Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management degree program.

Further information: Course availability and times

ISAM522 - Information Systems Audit II - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

This course examines the use of various standards, guidelines, laws and methods, which are used in information systems audits. The discussion serves both to set the governance framework, the information systems audit works within and the choices for specific courses of action to meet the requirements of the audit.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management degree program.

Corequisites: ISAM521 (Information Systems Audit I)

Further information: Course availability and times

ISAM542 - Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

This course will cover the principles and methodology of fraud detection and deterrence; an integral component to effective corporate compliance. The course includes such topics as: fraud theories, skimming, cash larceny, check tampering, register disbursement schemes, billing schemes, payroll and expense reimbursement schemes, non-cash misappropriation, corruption, accounting principles and fraud, fraudulent financial statements, and interviewing witnesses.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management degree program and undergraduate management (Management 430 series).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ISAM542 (Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination) or MGT 430 (Special Topics in Management: Fraud Examination-Theories and Methods)

Corequisites: ISSM542 (Financial Accounting) or ISAM512 (Financial Accounting and Analysis for Information Systems Auditors)

Further information: Course availability and times

ISAM549 - Auditing Theory and Application - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

The course presents an overview of the audit framework, as well as the external audit functions and procedures related to business operating cycles. Auditing standards, planning, internal controls testing, performing the audit and completing an audit file are addressed. The course also discusses the new professional developments that are taking place: adoption of new Canadian Audit Standards (CASs), further development of public accountability boards, and increasing emphasis on corporate governance, internal controls, risk-based auditing, independence and quality controls. The audit case requires students to design audit procedures, prepare working papers, and exercise professional judgment in completing an audit file.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Information Systems Assurance Management degree program.

Corequisites: ISAM512 (Financial Accounting and Analysis for Information Systems Auditors)

Further information: Course availability and times

ISAM558 - Research Methods II - 9 (0-3s-)
Faculty of Management

The reading and research-intensive seminar course is designed to help students to understand and analyse selected problems in information systems assurance management. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have acquired a solid understanding of the selected problems and each registered student will have developed a research proposal, which will be used as a basis for registration in either ISAM 580 or ISAM 581. ISAM 558 is a seminar course that builds on concepts covered in ISSM 538 and also on knowledge and skills from other MISSM and MISAM courses. In ISAM 558, students continue to work on research proposals started in ISSM 538, deepen their understanding of information systems assurance, learn to think critically about research problems, read literature critically and creatively in the fields of their research interest, evaluate the quality of research publications, and develop confidence that the identified problems can be addressed by graduate research. Students also apply critical and creative reading methods in evaluating and improving the quality of drafts of their own and peers' research proposals. MISAM Research Committee members oversee students' progress toward the course goals and are actively involved in ensuring that each student is making adequate progress in his or her research.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Information Systems Assurance Management degree program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ISAM558 (Research Methods II) or ISAM539

Prerequisites: ISSM538 (Research Methods I)

Further information: Course availability and times

ISAM563 - Governance and Assurance Seminar and Case Study - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

This course is the first of two capstone courses in information systems audit and is taken at the very end of the program just before the student enters the research phase of the MISAM program. Seminar topics may vary but the main focus is to examine a comprehensive case study and prepare and present a plan for conducting a substantial audit related to a public or private enterprise. Students will be evaluated in their presentations for many areas including planning the engagement, content of the audit plan, plans for execution, plans for management of stakeholders, contingency plans for unforeseen events and plans for minimizing costs.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management degree program.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

ISAM580 - Practicum Research Project - 9 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

A course where the student completes a research project while they are employed. The project must culminate in the production of a formal research document, which contributes to the information systems security and audit, assurance or government field/body of knowledge. The employment can add perspective to the research and can also form the entire subject to the research. Each student will conduct their research with the approval of the committee responsible for research in the MISAM program. The committee ensures that the project meets the standard for successful completion of the course and follows closely the previous committee-approval proposal.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Information Systems Assurance Management degree program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ISAM580 (Practicum Research Project) or ISAM570

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

ISAM581 - Research Project - 9 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

A course where the student completes a research project culminating in the production of a formal research document which contributes to the information systems security and audit, assurance or governance field/body of knowledge. Each student will conduct their research with the approval of the committee responsible for research in the MISAM program. The committee ensures that the project meets the standard for successful completion of the course and follows closely the previous committee approval proposal.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Information Systems Assurance Management degree program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of ISAM581 (Research Project) or ISAM571

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

Information Systems Security

ISS 403 - Operating Systems - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

An in-depth review of the main operating systems used to secure computer information networks. Students study the architecture of current versions of Microsoft NT, Windows, Linux, and UNIX, and they study the means for securing these environments using standard security methods suggested by the vendors of the server operating systems. During the course, students install operating systems, and they build and secure networks that incorporate these operating systems.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

Information Systems Security Management

ISSM503 - Operating Systems Security - 3 (2-1s-0)
Faculty of Management

This course has two components: a theory component to teach the concepts and principles that underlie modern operating systems, and a practice component to relate theoretical principles with operating system implementation. In the theory component, you will learn about processes and processor management, concurrency and synchronization, memory management schemes, file systems and secondary storage management security and protection, etc. The practice component will complement the theory component through some specific assignments illlustrating the use and implementation of these concepts.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM507 - Organizational Behaviour - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

Organizational behaviour integrates content from several fields including psychology, sociology, economics, organization theory, statistics, and others. This material is then applied to organizations to explain the motivation of people and how the potential of the human side of business is best harnessed. This content is a crucial area of knowledge in information systems security because of the constantly changing security environment and the changing importance of the roles of security officers. Topics such as work motivation, work attitudes, socialization, leadership, decision making, and management of change will all help prepare students for the challenges faced as a security professional or manager.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM521 - TCP/IP Security - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

A deep review of the TCP/IP protocol suite, with a focus on protocol analysis, and supplemented with various issues relevant to network security professionals, such as ARP cache poisoning, IP source address spoofing, DNS cache poisoning, and many others. Students will gain practical experience constructing internetworks and implementing servers for various application layer protocols. Students will also engage in exercises intended to illustrate many of the network security issues covered in the course.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM525 - Securing an E-Commerce Infrastructure - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

Securing the e-commerce infrastructure, taking into account data architecture and management and advanced network protocols. In the e-commerce environment, both information security needs of organizations and privacy needs of customers and clients are examined.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM531 - Advanced Network Security - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

Topics will include: intrusion/extrusion detection, network security monitoring, and network event reconstruction. Theory will include problems with and strategies for designing an environment conducive to network monitoring and intrusion detection. Practice will include implementing network security monitoring and intrusion detection in a test environment. Students will gain knowledge and experience identifying, interpreting, and reconstructing intrusions, and other security relevant network events.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Prerequisites: ISSM521 (TCP/IP Security)

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM533 - Cryptology and Secure Network Communications - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

This course in cryptography focuses on securing data through authentication, cryptographic algorithms, access control, public key encryption and public key distribution using best practices for secure communications. Students assess and evaluate cryptographic systems and how they can be incorporated into an information security system and the security plan for the enterprise. Students implement secure sites (on web servers) that require secure sockets layer for secure transactions. Emerging trends in encryption are discussed to prepare students for the ongoing changes which will be required to keep ahead of hackers.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Prerequisites: ISSM521 (TCP/IP Security)

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM535 - Firewall Fundamentals - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

The theory behind firewall architecture design and implementation, including the principles behind zone-based design. Students will gain hands-on experience in complex firewall architecture design , and will implement that design -- and the associated firewall rule sets -- in internetworks populated with various TCP/IP clients and servers. This course will also include discussion of new approaches such as distributed firewall architecture.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Prerequisites: ISSM521 (TCP/IP Security)

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM536 - Digital Forensics - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

In-depth coverage of live incident response and file system forensic analysis. The course will include the use of various tools and techniques used to extract information from digital media, with a focus on information that is difficult to find using normal methods. These tools and techniques will be supplemented with theoretical discussion, both of the structure of the media itself and of the nature and limitations of digital evidence. The course will cover the most commonly used operating systems and file systems.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Prerequisites: ISSM521 (TCP/IP Security)

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM538 - Research Methods I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

Students develop literature review on a topic of interest in information security which will later be used (if approved by the Master's Program Committee) as the basis to register in ISSM 559.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM541 - Management Accounting - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

Financial management theory and financial statement analysis. Students use rate-of-return, break-even, scenario analysis, and other methods to evaluate projects and organizational performance. Students also learn how to make financial proposals for new equipment needed for an information security enhancement. To a more limited degree, IT security auditing is also discussed along with the importance of IT auditing to the enterprise.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM542 - Financial Accounting - 3 (4-1s-0)
Faculty of Management

Postulates, principles, the accounting cycle, capital and income measurement, financial statement preparation and analysis, emphasis on reporting to shareholders, creditors, and other external decision-makers.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM543 - Systems Development and Project Management - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

An in-depth study of the concepts and techniques for designing, developing and/or revising software using a planned approach. Both the software development life-cycle model and project management approach is presented. Students apply project management concepts in this course to group and individual projects.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM545 - Security Policies, Standards and Management - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

This course provides students with the standards for creating an enterprise-wide security policy. Topics include: security management principles; defining security requirements; planning and documenting security policies; asset identification and control; system access control; and Internet security. Students also learn how to formulate, administer, manage and evaluate security policies and standards based on best standards for information systems security (ISO 17799), best practices for security auditing (COBIT) and the protection of private information required by Canadian laws.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM551 - Disaster Recovery and Planning - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

An in-depth coverage of disaster recovery planning including, techniques to prevent, detect, and recover from loss of information availability. Students are instructed in ways to formulate a disaster and recovery plan, and test and implement the plan in a simulated lab environment.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Prerequisites: ISSM521 (TCP/IP Security)

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM553 - Governance, Risk and Control - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

Principles, concepts and techniques applied to information systems security governance, risk and control are explored in this course. Topics covered include: a) the role of governance in the enterprise and study of ISACA's COBIT 5.0 governance framework; b) risk assessment methodologies and tools; and, c) the implementation and management of specific operational IT controls to ensure informational confidentiality, availability and integrity. Through lectures, presentations and labs, students also gain familiarity with issues related to occupatioal fraud and hacking attempts, and how these threats affect the IT risk management process.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM559 - Research Methods II - 9 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

Following ISSM 538, students develop a research plan and proposal which will later be used (if approved by Concordia's Master's Program Committee) as the basis to register in either ISSM 580 or ISSM 581.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Information Systems Security Management program.

Prerequisites: ISSM538 (Research Methods I)

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM561 - Information Technology Law and Ethics - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Management

An overview of international and Canadian laws, legislation, and legal issues relevant to the information systems security profession. Topics covered include the legal protection of information and systems technology, as well as balancing the legal rights to privacy for users. Legal "due diligence" responsibilities of information security professionals are also discussed.

Note: Open only to students in the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Assurance Management program and the Master or Diploma of Information Systems Security Management program.

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM580 - Practicum Research Project - 9 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

A research project culminating in a research document evaluated by an internal committee for its contribution to the field of information security. Each student will conduct his or her research while employed in a professional work environment. In addition, each student will conduct his or her research using a proposal approved by the Master's Program Committee of the program.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Information Systems Security Management program.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

ISSM581 - Research Project - 9 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

A research project culminating in a research document evaluated by an internal committee for its contribution to the field of information security. Each student will conduct his or her research using a proposal approved by the Master's Program Committee of the program.

Note: Open only to students in the Master of Information Systems Security Management program.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

Information Technology

IT 101 - Introduction to Information Technology - 3 (2-1s-0)
Faculty of Science

Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks, and computer communications, the Internet and the World Wide Web, network protocols and addressing, cyberthreats and security, and other emerging technologies. The impact of information technology on our lives is also explored.

Further information: Course availability and times

IT 201 - Information Security - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

A review of the major issues of information security, including security threats, passwords, encryption, security policies, and intrusion detection systems.

Prerequisites: CMPT111 (Introduction to Computing Science) [C- minimum grade required] or CMPT112 [C- minimum grade required] or IT 101 (Introduction to Information Technology) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

IT 202 - Web Design - 3 (3-1.5L-0)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to modern technologies for designing websites. Topic include the basics of coding and styling webpages, building responsive webpages, forms, tables, adding JavaScript and multimedia elements, testing and debugging webpages, publishing pages on the Web.

Prerequisites: CMPT111 (Introduction to Computing Science) [C- minimum grade required] or CMPT112 [C- minimum grade required] or IT 101 (Introduction to Information Technology) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

IT 210 - Operating Systems - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

An overview of modern operating systems. Topics include concepts that underlie operating systems, basic functions common to all operating systems, operating systems security, desktop virtualization software, types of operating systems. Discussions of operating systems environments include DOS, Windows family, versions of UNIX (Linux, MAC OS, Solaris).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of IT 210 (Operating Systems) or IT 102

Prerequisites: (IT 101 (Introduction to Information Technology) [C- minimum grade required] or CMPT111 (Introduction to Computing Science) [C- minimum grade required] or CMPT112 [C- minimum grade required] ) and 2nd year standing required or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: 3 credits in Computing Science or Information Technology [C- minimum grade required]

IT 301 - Digital Media - 3 (3-3L-0)
Faculty of Science

A study of both scientific concepts and hands-on production aspects of digital images, video, and audio, providing exposure to basic computer programming through animation and game programming.

Prerequisites: CMPT111 (Introduction to Computing Science) [C- minimum grade required] or CMPT112 [C- minimum grade required] or IT 101 (Introduction to Information Technology) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

IT 302 - Database Systems - 3 (3-3L-0)
Faculty of Science

The course introduces some of the core concepts of the database systems such as: the relational model; Structured Query Language (SQL); database modeling, design and administration; database processing applications and the big data phenomenon.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of IT 302 (Database Systems) or BUS 250 (Management Information Systems)

Prerequisites: CMPT111 (Introduction to Computing Science) [C- minimum grade required] or CMPT112 [C- minimum grade required] or IT 101 (Introduction to Information Technology) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Latin

LAT 101 - Introductory Latin I - 3 (3-2L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Elements of Latin grammar and reading of simple texts.

Note: Not open to students with credit in Latin 30 or LAT 100.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of LAT 101 (Introductory Latin I) or LAT 100 or (30-level Latin or equivalent)

Further information: Course availability and times

LAT 102 - Introductory Latin II - 3 (3-2L-0)
Faculty of Arts

A continuation of LAT 101.

Note: Not open to students with credit in Latin 30 or LAT 100.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of LAT 102 (Introductory Latin II) or LAT 100 or (30-level Latin or equivalent)

Prerequisites: LAT 101 (Introductory Latin I)

Further information: Course availability and times

Leadership

LDR 301 - Foundations of Leadership - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

The foundational framework of knowledge and critical thinking skills needed by all future organizational leaders. Learners examine theories, values, issues, and skills of leadership, motivation and communication using case studies, texts, articles and electronic discussion activities.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of LDR 301 (Foundations of Leadership) or MGT 300 (Foundations of Leadership)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

LDR 310 - Fundamentals of Project Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

This course provides students an understanding of how to effectively manage all phases of a project. Students will learn the project management framework of initiation, planning, execution, control, and closing. An overview of project management software is provided with students using a specific type to complete a group project.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of LDR 310 (Fundamentals of Project Management) or MGT 423

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

LDR 320 - Organizational Leadership - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

A range of leadership issues and approaches as they relate to contemporary organization are studied. Data collection methods used by leaders to acquire the information they need for decision making are identified. Approaches to communicating decisions and information are also discussed. Students gain an understanding of how leaders and followers can work together to address issues related to performance while transforming the people of the organization to higher levels of satisfaction and productivity.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of LDR 320 (Organizational Leadership) or MGT 421

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

LDR 402 - Global Strategic Leadership - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

Provides students with an understanding of global issues and crosscultural concepts focusing on people, groups, values and cultures. Students will learn how to build teams of culturally diverse people while respecting local values and maintaining unity of focus and accomplishment. The focus is to understand and respect diversity and how to adapt an organization's best practices to local customs and culture.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of LDR 402 (Global Strategic Leadership) or MGT 402 (Global Strategic Leadership)

Prerequisites: LDR 301 (Foundations of Leadership) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

LDR 410 - Organizational Analysis and Design - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

An examination of the dynamics, processes, and challenges inherent in analysing and then designing (or redesigning) an organization for optimal performance. Students will explore a comprehensive process for guiding an organizational design effort--from problem definition and analysis, through design recommendations, to implementing the new design into the workplace.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of LDR 410 (Organizational Analysis and Design) or MGT 315

Prerequisites: BUS 120 (Organizational Behaviour) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

LDR 420 - Leadership Psychology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

This course explores a wide range of psychological aspects of leadership including leadership styles and gender-related issues, power, motivation, teams, coaching, and mentoring. Students also learn about organizational behaviour and explore how organizational behaviour concepts influence leadership effectiveness.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: MGT 300 (Foundations of Leadership) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Management

MGT 220 - Principles of Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

An understanding of the management roles and skills necessary in exercising those roles is developed. Topics include the core principles of management, planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MGT 220 (Principles of Management) or BUS 220 (Principles of Management)

Prerequisites: BUS 110 (Business Fundamentals) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 300 - Foundations of Leadership - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

The foundational framework of knowledge and critical thinking skills needed by all future organizational leaders. Learners examine theories, values, issues, and skills of leadership, motivation and communication using case studies, texts, articles and electronic discussion activities.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MGT 300 (Foundations of Leadership) or LDR 301 (Foundations of Leadership)

Prerequisites: BUS 220 (Principles of Management) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 310 - Communicating Effectively - 3 (3-0-0)
Multi faculty course

Students will examine the various types of communication including dyadic communication, small group communication, formal and informal communication, and the relationship of communication to organizational satisfaction and effectiveness. In addition, students will learn how communication defers in leader-member exchange and mass-communication of charismatic leader/large group interaction.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 320 - Operations Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

This course builds upon the corporate financial framework developed in FIN 201. The course provides students with a broad understanding and knowledge of several operations management concepts. Such concepts include (but are not limited to) operations strategy, process and services design, forecasting, inventory management, scheduling, and quality management. Emphasis will be placed on the application of these concepts to actual business situations. Students acquire an awareness and understanding of the design, operations and control of production and operations systems by engaging in field study projects within business enterprises.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: FIN 201 (Corporate Finance) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 323 - Business and Society - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

Managerial and administrative issues in the public or non-market sector are reviewed including the social, political and legal environments of business.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: BUS 220 (Principles of Management) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 324 - e-Supply Chain Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

This course provides a framework for assessing the impact of e-business on supply chain management (SCM). This course offers an in-depth review and examination of the concepts, processes, and strategies used in the development and management of global supply chains. Specific topics include global supply chain management, procurement, electronic commerce, information technologies, and logistics activities.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: FIN 201 (Corporate Finance) and MGT 320 (Operations Management) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 327 - Small Business Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

An exploration of small business as a career alternative, this course addresses the nature of entrepreneurship and the elements of start-up: opportunity identification, feasibility analysis, the integration of marketing and operating strategies, venture finance, and the business plan.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 374 - Ethical Theory and Business - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

An introduction to basic ethical concepts and principles that are relevant to business. A survey of basic ethical perspectives (Religious, Christian and Philosophical) will establish the conceptual foundation that students will then apply in considering examples and cases from the business world. The course will also address the use of ethics in solving moral dilemmas that arise in business interactions.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MGT 374 (Ethical Theory and Business) or REL 374 (Ethical Theory and Business)

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 402 - Global Strategic Leadership - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

Provides students with an understanding of global issues and cross-cultural concepts focusing on people, groups, values and cultures. Students will learn how to build teams of culturally diverse people while respecting local values and maintaining unity of focus and accomplishment. The focus is to understand and respect diversity and how to adapt an organization's best practices to local customs and culture.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MGT 402 (Global Strategic Leadership) or LDR 402 (Global Strategic Leadership)

Prerequisites: MGT 300 (Foundations of Leadership) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 410 - International Business: Factors and Influences - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

To be successful in today's work world, individuals need an understanding of the geopolitical, social and cultural systems that affect them in multinational organizations. Students will examine government, geography, culture, education, and social systems and their interaction. Students will develop an assessment plan for a geographical region, i.e., Asia, Europe, Central/South America, and Africa.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: MGT 300 (Foundations of Leadership) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 417 - Principles of Strategic Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

This course builds upon the knowledge and understanding of people and leadership to begin building a comprehensive approach related to the design, planning, and implementation of strategies and tactics designed to accomplish goals and objectives. Students will examine techniques of strategic planning and learn when and where each is effective. Students will also examine how to identify abilities and skills of employees thus tying the concepts of individual development and group formation into the strategic planning process.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: MGT 300 (Foundations of Leadership) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 429 - Senior Applied Project - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

Effective environmental research, information analysis, and problem solving are essential to organizational planning and decision making. In this course, students apply their training and skills in research, strategic and change management, communication, and specific professional/technical fields to generate viable solutions for real-life organizational concerns and problems.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: MARK223 (Marketing Research) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 430 - Special Topics in Management: Fraud Examination-Theories and Methods - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

Fraud examination will cover the principles and methodology of fraud detection and deterrence in an enterprise; an integral component to effective corporate compliance. The course includes such topics as: fraud theories, skimming, cash larceny, cheque tampering, register disbursement schemes, billing schemes, payroll and expense reimbursement schemes, non-cash misappropriations, corruption, accounting principles and fraud, fraudulent financial statements, and interviewing witnesses. This course is a must for any business student who wants to differentiate him/herself in the marketplace.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: Management (12SR) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 431 - Special Topics in Management: Social Media: An Interdisciplinary Approach - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

This course offers students the opportunity to study a special interest topic in business or management. It is an advanced course intended for students in the third or fourth year of the Bachelor of Management program and will, in many cases, build on knowledge gained from existing courses in the program. This course explores the use of social media at every level of society. As the course seeks to investigate the extent of pervasiveness of social media, students will research and propose how social media can be used positively in respective areas of interest such as business, education, society and information management. For example, in business, students can propose social media applications in finance, marketing, leadership and human resources management. In education, students can recommend applications in learning of math, music, sciences, language and environmental health. In society, students can generate ideas for application in government, sociology, psychology, and pastoral ministries. In information management, students can formulate frameworks for ethics, privacy, security and terrorism management. The student is expected to learn and share insights into the future of social media--identifying and proposing ways to stop abuse and enhance the effective use of social media to benefit society.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: Management (12SR) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 440 - Consulting - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

This course will provide students with the skills required in conducting research for business clients. More specifically, the course will equip the senior business students (preferably fourth-year) to gather, analyze, and interpret information that links dimensions of the business environment. Using marketing information, students can then identify and define opportunities and issues. Course activities include developing a research proposal, project timelines, data collection techniques, analyzing qualitative and quantitative data, and writing a research report.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: MARK223 (Marketing Research) and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 474 - Business Ethics: Concepts and Cases - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A continuation of the discussion of ethical examples in business and management and draws upon situations and cases emphasizing senior-level ethical concepts and principles. Students are required to complete a project. Those students who have elected a minor are encouraged to focus their project in that area.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MGT 474 (Business Ethics: Concepts and Cases) or REL 474 (Business Ethics: Concepts and Cases)

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 496 - Work Experience - 9 (0-0-0)
Faculty of Management

A 450-hour work experience in which students receive a hands-on opportunity to work in an organization. The practicum is identified by the student and overseen by the Faculty of Professional Studies. The student will take on the employment duties and responsibilities assigned by the sponsoring organization and approved by the Faculty supervisor. Evaluations of the practicum are completed by both the student and practicum supervisor.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MGT 496 (Work Experience) or MGT 499 (Practicum or Field Placement)

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 497 - Skills Development - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

This course involves completing four classroom based modules designed to enhance learning from the work experience, communication skills, proposal development abilities, networking and career skills. These modules are designed to enhance students' career preparedness and to begin the process of building networks in the business community. Employer meetings and functions will be planned. Student attendance is mandatory.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MGT 497 (Skills Development) or MGT 499 (Practicum or Field Placement)

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 498 - Internship - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Management

The Internship is a 13-week work experience placement in sponsoring organizations. It is designed to give third- or fourth-year management students a supervised practical experience in becoming a business professional. During the practicum placement, the student has a practical application of business skills and theory to a problem or issues addressed during a period of 13 weeks of summer placement. Organizations can include private industry, government, or not-for-profit sectors. The internship includes preliminary instruction and requires, under the supervision of the Faculty, the presentation of a project report to the sponsoring organization.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program.

Prerequisites: MARK223 (Marketing Research) and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MGT 499 - Practicum or Field Placement - 12 (0-0-0)
Faculty of Management

A 450-hour work experience in which students receive a hands-on opportunity to work in an organization. The practicum is identified by the student and overseen by the Faculty of Professional Studies. Students also complete four classroom-based modules designed to enhance learning, communication skills, proposal development, networking abilities and career skills.

Note: Open only to students in the Bachelor of Management program with permission of the Department.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MGT 499 (Practicum or Field Placement) or (MGT 496 (Work Experience) and MGT 497 (Skills Development))

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

Marketing

MARK201 - Introduction to Marketing - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

The fundamental principles of marketing are introduced, including buyer behaviour; identifying, segmenting and targeting markets; the market mix; and strategic marketing.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MARK201 (Introduction to Marketing) or MARKT301

Prerequisites: ECO 101 (Introduction to Microeconomics) and ECO 102 (Introduction to Macroeconomics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MARK223 - Marketing Research - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

The research methods and analytical techniques required to support marketing decisions and to assist in the formation of marketing strategies, including new product development, pricing, distribution and sales approaches. Students learn how to use tools to address behavioural, financial, and numerical analysis and how to apply the analysis in business decisions.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MARK223 (Marketing Research) or MARK423 (Marketing Research)

Prerequisites: MARK201 (Introduction to Marketing) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MARK300 - Strategic Marketing - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

The creative and systematic use of marketing concepts and strategies in the design and evaluation of strategic plans at all levels of the organization. The strategic role of marketing within an organization and its integration with other functional units is studied. Students are expected to develop a working knowledge of a family of strategic marketing planning processes, concepts, methods, and strategies.

Prerequisites: MARK201 (Introduction to Marketing) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MARK320 - Advertising and Promotion - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

A focus on the promotional mix with an emphasis on the advertising and promotion functions. The framework used is that of integrated marketing communications. Communications theory and models are studied and related to practical applications. The viewpoint taken is that of the promotions manager, rather than that of the advertising technician.

Prerequisites: MARK201 (Introduction to Marketing) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MARK400 - Consumer Behaviour - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

Psychological theory and research that is particularly applicable to the understanding of consumer behaviour. How this theory and research in consumer behaviour can be effectively employed in marketing decision-making.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MARK400 (Consumer Behaviour) or MARK321

Prerequisites: MARK201 (Introduction to Marketing) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MARK420 - International Marketing - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

The ability of organizations to successfully introduce new products and services and thereby penetrate international markets has become a defining strategic challenge. This course examines marketing strategies, plans, approaches, and initiatives utilized by leading international firms to establish and increase global market share and successfully overcome existing and emerging barriers to entry.

Prerequisites: MARK201 (Introduction to Marketing) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MARK423 - Marketing Research - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Management

The research methods and analytical techniques required to support marketing decisions and to assist in the formation of marketing strategies, including new product development, pricing, distribution and sales approaches. Students learn how to use tools to address behavioural, financial, and numerical analysis and how to apply the analysis in business decisions.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MARK423 (Marketing Research) or MARK223 (Marketing Research)

Prerequisites: MARK201 (Introduction to Marketing) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Mathematics

MAT 102 - Mathematical Motif - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

A course in mathematical thought and effective thinking. An introduction to what mathematics is and what it means to do mathematics. An exploration of some of the great ideas of mathematics including numbers from the integers to the reals, from the finite to infinity and beyond, and contortions of space.

Note: This course is not accepted toward a Mathematics major, concentration, or minor.

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) or (Math 30-2 or equivalent) or (Applied Mathematics 30 or equivalent) or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Applied or Pure Mathematics 20, Mathematics 20-1, or Mathematics 20-2

MAT 103 - Mathematical Methods for the Life Sciences - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to mathematical methods used in the life sciences including combinatorial methods, probability theory and elementary inferential statistics, matrix theory and Markov chains, and dynamic systems.

Note: Open only to students with a major, concentration, or minor in Biology or Environmental Science.

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) or (Math 30-2 or equivalent) or MAT 110 (Pre-Calculus)

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 105 - The Heart of Mathematics - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

A course of mathematical thought and effective thinking. An introduction to what mathematics is and what it means to do mathematics. An exploration of some of the great ideas of mathematics including geometry from 1 to 4 dimensions, fractals, certainty about uncertainty and decision making.

Note: This course is not accepted toward a Mathematics major, concentration, or minor.

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) or (Math 30-2 or equivalent) or (Applied Mathematics 30 or equivalent) or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Applied or Pure Mathematics 20, Mathematics 20-1, or Mathematics 20-2

MAT 110 - Pre-Calculus - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

A course intended for students who feel that they are weak in mathematics or have little or no computer skill. The primary goals are to upgrade the student's background in mathematics and to introduce the use of a computer algebra system in preparation for calculus. This course is also a preparation for linear algebra.

Note: This course is not accepted toward a Mathematics major, concentration, or minor.

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) or (Math 30-2 or equivalent) or (Applied Mathematics 30 or equivalent) or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Applied or Pure Mathematics 20, Mathematics 20-1, or Mathematics 20-2

MAT 114 - Elementary Calculus I - 3 (0-5L-0)
Faculty of Science

Differentiation of polynomial, rational, and trigonometric functions. Indefinite and definite integrals. Applications and approximations. Introduction to a computer algebra system.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MAT 114 (Elementary Calculus I) or MAT 113

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) [75% minimum grade required] or ((Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) and (Math 31 or equivalent) ) or MAT 110 (Pre-Calculus)

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 115 - Elementary Calculus II - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Science

Exponential, logarithmic and inverse trigonometric functions. Indeterminate forms. Techniques of integration. Improper integrals. Applications.

Prerequisites: MAT 113 [C- minimum grade required] or MAT 114 (Elementary Calculus I) [C- minimum grade required]

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 120 - Linear Algebra I - 3 (0-4.5L-0)
Faculty of Science

Matrix algebra and systems of linear equations. Vector equations of lines and planes. Matrix inverses and invertibility. Euclidean n-spaces, subspaces, and bases. Dot product and orthogonality. Determinants. Introduction to linear transformations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and to a computer algebra system.

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) or (Math 30-2 or equivalent) or MAT 110 (Pre-Calculus)

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 151 - Introduction to Statistical Methods - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

Data collection and presentation, descriptive statistics. Probability distributions, sampling distributions and the central limit theorem. Point estimation and hypothesis testing. Correlation and regression analysis. Goodness of fit and contingency table. One-way ANOVA. Introduction to spreadsheets and dedicated statistics software.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MAT 151 (Introduction to Statistical Methods) or BUS 112 (Business Statistics) or PSY 211 (Statistical Methods for Psychological Research) or SOC 210 (Introduction to Social Statistics)

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) or (Math 30-2 or equivalent) or MAT 110 (Pre-Calculus)

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 200 - Foundations of Mathematics - 3 (1-2s-0)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to proofs and axiomatic set theory.

Note: Restricted to students with a major, concentration, or minor in Mathematics, or to students with permission of the Department. Open to first-year students.

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) or (Math 30-2 or equivalent) or (Math 31 or equivalent) or MAT 110 (Pre-Calculus)

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 214 - Intermediate Calculus I - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Science

Infinite series. Taylor series. Parametric equations and polar coordinates. Three dimensional analytic geometry. Vector functions, tangent vectors, arc length parameters and curvature. Partial derivatives.

Note: MAT 120 is recommended as a prerequisite or corequisite.

Prerequisites: MAT 115 (Elementary Calculus II) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 215 - Intermediate Calculus II - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Science

First order and second order linear differential equations with constant coefficients. Multiple integrals in two and three dimensions. Rectangular, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Line and surface integrals. Green's, divergence, and Stoke's theorems.

Prerequisites: MAT 214 (Intermediate Calculus I) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 220 - Symbolic Logic - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

A quick review of sentential logic, a detailed study of predicate logic, and an introduction to some more advanced topics (e.g., modal logic, and "metalogical" issues and theorems). May use computer-assisted instruction.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MAT 220 (Symbolic Logic) or PHIL220 (Symbolic Logic) or PHIL420 (The Philosopher's Craft: Symbolic Logic)

Prerequisites: MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) or PHIL125 (Introduction to Logic) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 223 - Introduction to Abstract Algebra - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to axiomatic set theory, universal algebra and its applications to group, ring, and field theory including congruences, quotient algebras, and homomorphisms.

Prerequisites: MAT 120 (Linear Algebra I) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 224 - Linear Algebra II - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Science

General vector spaces. Inner product spaces. Orthonormal bases. Gram-Schmidt process. QR-decomposition. Least squares. Change of basis. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and diagonalization. Orthogonal diagonalization. Linear transformations. Quadratic forms. Applications.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MAT 224 (Linear Algebra II) or MAT 121

Prerequisites: ((Math 31 or equivalent) or MAT 113 or MAT 114 (Elementary Calculus I)) and MAT 120 (Linear Algebra I) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 241 - Geometry I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Euclidean plane geometry and affine geometry. Isometries, similarities, and inversions. Concurrency and collinearity.

Prerequisites: MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 250 - Introduction to Mathematics of Finance - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to the theory of interest. Mathematical models and their analysis for problems involving fixed interest rates. Simple and compound interest. Cash flows, annuities, amortization and sinking funds. (Zero-) coupon bonds.

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) or (Math 30-2 or equivalent) or (Math 31 or equivalent) or MAT 110 (Pre-Calculus) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 300 - Independent Studies in Mathematics - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Science

In consultation with a member of the Mathematics Department, the student undertakes an independent study of an approved advanced topic not covered in any other course.

Note: Open only to Mathematics majors.

Prerequisites: MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and Mathematics (15SR) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Minimum grade of C- in each course

MAT 311 - Functions of a Complex Variable - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Complex numbers. Functions of a complex variable. Riemann surfaces. Complex series. Cauchy's Theorem and contour integration. Residue Theorem and applications. Analytic continuation.

Prerequisites: MAT 214 (Intermediate Calculus I) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 321 - Introduction to Discrete Mathematics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Techniques of discrete mathematics. Topics include: principles of counting, generating functions, principle of inclusion/exclusion, pigeonhole principle, recurrence relations, graphs and trees.

Prerequisites: MAT 120 (Linear Algebra I) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 331 - Introduction to Differential Equations - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Science

First-order ODEs, direction fields, exact and numerical methods of solution, existence and uniqueness, applications and modelling. Second-order ODEs, with constant coefficients, homogeneous and non-homogeneous; methods of undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters; applications and modelling. Power series solutions of second-order ODEs about ordinary and singular points. Laplace Transform Methods.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MAT 331 (Introduction to Differential Equations) or MAT 431

Prerequisites: MAT 120 (Linear Algebra I) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 214 (Intermediate Calculus I) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 340 - Numerical Methods - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

An introduction to numerical methods: floating-point number representation, errors and role of stability in numerical calculations; direct and iterative solutions of linear systems of equations; methods for solving non-linear equations; interpolation; least-squares approximation of functions; numerical integration; and numerical solution of initial value problems for ordinary differential equations.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MAT 340 (Numerical Methods) or CMPT340 (Numerical Methods)

Prerequisites: MAT 115 (Elementary Calculus II) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 120 (Linear Algebra I) [C- minimum grade required] and (Mathematics (12) or Computing Science (6) or Information Technology (6) ) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 400 - Thesis in Mathematics - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Science

Supervised by a faculty member in the Mathematics Department, the student undertakes an independent study of an approved topic and completes a written thesis. The grade is determined solely by the quality of the thesis and its oral defence. The topic will normally be an extension of material covered in 400-level Mathematics courses successfully taken by the student.

Note: Open only to Mathematics majors in their fourth year. A 3-credit course over the full academic year.

Prerequisites: MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and (MAT 401 (Real Analysis I) or MAT 402 or MAT 421 (Introduction to Combinatorics) or MAT 422 or MAT 424 (Formal Languages, Automata and Computability) or MAT 441 (Game Theory) or MAT 442 (Topics in Probability Theory and Statistics) or MAT 491 (Mathematical Modelling) or MAT 492 (Partial Differential Equations)) and Mathematics (12SR) and 4th year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 401 - Real Analysis I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Real analysis, including the real numbers system, metric spaces (connectedness, completeness, and compactness), and the Riemann and Lebesgue Integrals.

Prerequisites: MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 215 (Intermediate Calculus II) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 421 - Introduction to Combinatorics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Methods and applications of combinatorial mathematics including graph theory (matchings, chromatic numbers, planar graphs, independence and clique numbers) and related algorithms, combinatorial designs (block designs, Latin squares, projective geometries), error correcting codes.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MAT 421 (Introduction to Combinatorics) or CMPT421 (Introduction to Combinatorics)

Prerequisites: MAT 120 (Linear Algebra I) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 321 (Introduction to Discrete Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 424 - Formal Languages, Automata and Computability - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Formal grammars; normal forms; relationship between grammars and automata; regular expressions; finite state machines, state minimization; pushdown automata; Turing machines; computability; complexity; introduction to recursive function theory.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MAT 424 (Formal Languages, Automata and Computability) or CMPT474 (Formal Languages, Automata and Computability)

Prerequisites: MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and (Mathematics (12) or Computing Science (9) or Information Technology (9) ) and 2nd year standing required or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: *9 additional credits of Mathematics to a total of 12 including MAT 200

MAT 441 - Game Theory - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

An introductory course in Game Theory including such topics as non-cooperative finite games (two person zero-sum [constant-sum] games, n-person games), cooperative finite games, linear programming.

Prerequisites: MAT 120 (Linear Algebra I) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 151 (Introduction to Statistical Methods) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 442 - Topics in Probability Theory and Statistics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Topics in advanced probability and statistics including stochastic processes, random walks, and time series analysis.

Prerequisites: MAT 120 (Linear Algebra I) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 151 (Introduction to Statistical Methods) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 215 (Intermediate Calculus II) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MAT 491 - Mathematical Modelling - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Science

Develops students' problem-solving abilities along heuristic lines and illustrates the process of Applied Mathematics. Students are encouraged to recognize and formulate problems in mathematical terms, solve the resulting mathematical problem, and interpret the solution in real world terms.

Prerequisites: MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and (Mathematics (12) or Computing Science (9) or Information Technology (9) ) and 2nd year standing required or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: *9 additional credits of Mathematics to a total of 12 including MAT 200

MAT 492 - Partial Differential Equations - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Science

Introduction to partial differential equations, boundary value problems, special functions, numerical solutions and Fourier and Laplace transform techniques.

Prerequisites: MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 215 (Intermediate Calculus II) [C- minimum grade required] and MAT 331 (Introduction to Differential Equations) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Music (Applied)

MSEM - Music Seminar - 0 (--)
Faculty of Arts

A weekly departmental demonstration/recital which highlights aspects of musicianship and performance.

Note: All students registered in any Applied Music course (MUP courses ending in 22, 23, 26, or 27) are required to attend this Music Seminar (MSEM).

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 112 - Class Piano - 1.5 (1-0-1)
Faculty of Arts

Fundamental piano skills for students with very little or no previous training in piano.

Note: This class is strongly recommended for students in music major, concentration or minor with no piano background before progressing to MUS 213.

Prerequisites: MUS 100 (Rudiments of Music) or MUS 120 (Advanced Rudiments of Music) or MUS 211 (Music Theory I)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 114 - Class Guitar I - 1.5 (1-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Fundamental guitar skills, aural training, and music reading as they apply to solo and ensemble guitar playing.

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 115 - Class Guitar II - 1.5 (1-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A continuation of MUP 114.

Prerequisites: MUP 114 (Class Guitar I)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 116 - Class Voice I - 1.5 (1-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Fundamental vocal skills, aural training, and music reading as they apply to choral and vocal singing.

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 117 - Class Voice II - 1.5 (1-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A continuation of MUP 116.

Prerequisites: MUP 116 (Class Voice I)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 122 - Applied Music (Novice Level or Secondary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private or group music lessons in the student's performance area, either as a novice or as a secondary performance area.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: May not be used toward a Music major, concentration, or minor. An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 123 - Applied Music (Novice Level or Secondary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private or group music lessons in the student's performance area, either as a novice or as a secondary performance area.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: May not be used toward a Music major, concentration, or minor. An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 122 (Applied Music (Novice Level or Secondary Area))

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 126 - Applied Music (Primary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's primary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUS 100 (Rudiments of Music) or MUS 111 or MUS 120 (Advanced Rudiments of Music) or MUS 211 (Music Theory I) or MUP 123 (Applied Music (Novice Level or Secondary Area)) and Consent of Department

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 127 - Applied Music (Primary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's primary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 126 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) [B- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 222 - Applied Music (Secondary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's secondary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 123 (Applied Music (Novice Level or Secondary Area)) [B- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 223 - Applied Music (Secondary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's secondary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 222 (Applied Music (Secondary Area)) [B- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 226 - Applied Music (Primary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's primary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 127 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) [B- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 227 - Applied Music (Primary) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's primary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 226 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) [B- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 322 - Applied Music (Secondary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's secondary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 223 (Applied Music (Secondary Area)) [B- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 323 - Applied Music (Secondary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's secondary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 322 (Applied Music (Secondary Area)) [B- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 326 - Applied Music (Primary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's primary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 227 (Applied Music (Primary)) [B- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 327 - Applied Music (Primary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's primary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 326 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) [B- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 422 - Applied Music (Secondary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's secondary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 323 (Applied Music (Secondary Area)) [B- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 423 - Applied Music (Secondary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's secondary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 422 (Applied Music (Secondary Area)) [B- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 426 - Applied Music (Primary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's primary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 327 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) [B- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 427 - Applied Music (Primary Area) - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's primary area of study.

REGISTRATION NOTES for private music lesson courses:
Voice lessons - Register in section A (Fall term) or section D (Winter term).
Piano lessons - Register in section B (Fall term) or section E (Winter term).
Instrument lessons - Register in section C (Fall term) or section F (Winter term).

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 426 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) [B- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MSEM (Music Seminar)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 495 - Recital Preparation in Applied Music - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's primary area of study, including the preparation and research for substantial performance in recital.

Note: May not be taken concurrently with any MUP course in a student's primary area without consent of the Department. An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 327 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) and MUS 490 (Topics in Music) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 496 - Applied Music (Recital) - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private music lessons in the student's primary area of study, including a substantial performance in recital.

Note: May not be taken concurrently with any MUP course in a student's primary area without consent of the Department. An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: MUP 495 (Recital Preparation in Applied Music) [B- minimum grade required]

Further information: Course availability and times

Music (Professional Development)

MUS 601 - Advanced Musicianship, Philosophy, and Pedagogy - 2 (2-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Tonal theories and their application to sight singing and ear training skills as well as pedagogical philosophies and their implementation in performance study at all levels. Analysis of representative literature, educational methods, rhythmic and melodic reading and improvisation.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 630 - Topics in Choral Conducting, Techniques, and Literature I - 1.5 (0-1.5s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Selected topics in conducting, techniques, and literature are covered including relevant observation, research, and application.

Note: Open only to students who have already completed a bachelor's degree or are in their last year of undergraduate study.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 631 - Topics in Choral Conducting, Techniques, and Literature II - 1.5 (0-1.5s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Selected topics in conducting, techniques, and literature are covered including relevant observation, research, and application.

Note: Open only to students who have already completed a bachelor's degree or are in their last year of undergraduate study.

Prerequisites: MUS 630 (Topics in Choral Conducting, Techniques, and Literature I) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

Music

MUS 100 - Rudiments of Music - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Fundamentals of music theory approached through aural and written training, including an understanding of intervals. For beginners as well as music students with a weak background in theory.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 100 (Rudiments of Music) or MUS 111

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 101 - Music of the Western World - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A study of music literature with an emphasis on listening and analytical tools. A brief study of the history of Western music is included.

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 120 - Advanced Rudiments of Music - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Advanced fundamentals of music theory including intervals, chords, scales, compound meters, and key signatures along with musicianship training in rhytmic and melodic sight-singing, and music dictation and writing in pentatonic and diatonic modes.

Prerequisites: MUS 100 (Rudiments of Music) [C- minimum grade required]

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 211 - Music Theory I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic materials of music; diatonic chords, triadic inversions, cadences, and chord progressions of 'common practice music', including harmonic analysis and part-writing.

Note: MUS 213 taken concurrently is strongly recommended.

Prerequisites: MUS 120 (Advanced Rudiments of Music) [C- minimum grade required]

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS212 - Music Theory II - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Contrapuntal and harmonic practice of the 'common practice' including triadic inversion, non-harmonic tones, seventh chords, and diatonic modulation, including analysis and part-writing.

Note: MUS 214 taken concurrently is strongly recommended.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS212 (Music Theory II) or MUS 156

Prerequisites: MUS 211 (Music Theory I) [C- minimum grade required]

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 213 - Aural and Keyboard Skills I - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

The aural perception of materials covered in MUS 211 through the practice of sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony.

Note: MUS 211 taken concurrently is strongly recommended.

Prerequisites: MUS 120 (Advanced Rudiments of Music) [C- minimum grade required]

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 214 - Aural and Keyboard Skills II - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

The aural perception of materials covered in MUS212 through the practice of sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 214 (Aural and Keyboard Skills II) or MUS 153

Prerequisites: MUS 213 (Aural and Keyboard Skills I) [C- minimum grade required]

Corequisites: MUS212 (Music Theory II)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 261 - Church Music History - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An overview of church music history in light of Biblical references, historical evolution and Lutheran tradition. Includes analysis of the role of music in worship.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 261 (Church Music History) or MUS 331

Prerequisites: Music (3)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 262 - Congregational Song - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

History, analysis and practical application of congregational song, including chant, chorales, metrical psalms, hymns, folk songs, spirituals, gospel songs, praise choruses, and global song, with an emphasis on leading corporate singing. Discussion of the church year, lectionary, and philosophy of church music also included.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 262 (Congregational Song) or MUS 332

Prerequisites: Music (3)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 263 - Contemporary Worship Leadership - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Studies in contemporary worship leadership, including philosophy, research, and practical application in band-led worship.

Prerequisites: Music (3)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 281 - History of Western Music: Antiquity through Baroque - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the history of music from antiquity to 1750. Composers, compositions, styles, forms, and trends in musical development are included.

Prerequisites: MUS 120 (Advanced Rudiments of Music) or MUS 211 (Music Theory I) or Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 282 - History of Western Music: Classical to Present - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the history of music from 1750 to the present. Composers, compositions, styles, forms, and trends in musical development are included.

Prerequisites: MUS 120 (Advanced Rudiments of Music) or MUS 211 (Music Theory I) or Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 295 - Introduction to Music Therapy - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to music therapy, the study of the prescribed, structured use of music to restore, maintain and/or improve individuals' physical, emotional, social, spiritual, cognitive, and psychological well-being. This course is of interest to those working with individuals with special needs.

Prerequisites: MUS 100 (Rudiments of Music) or MUS 111 or MUS 120 (Advanced Rudiments of Music) or MUS 211 (Music Theory I) or Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 296 - Introduction to Audio Technologies - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to acoustics, including those of musical instruments; history and application of recording technologies, including computer hardware, software and MIDI; and application of theories of music technologies.

Prerequisites: MUS 100 (Rudiments of Music) or MUS 111 or MUS 120 (Advanced Rudiments of Music) or MUS 211 (Music Theory I)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 311 - Theory of 19th Century Music - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Nineteenth-century chromatic harmonies including secondary dominants, chromatic modulation, borrowed chords, Neapolitan and augmented sixth chords, enharmonic modulations, including analysis and part-writing.

Note: MUS 313 taken concurrently is strongly recommended.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 311 (Theory of 19th Century Music) or MUS 255

Prerequisites: MUS212 (Music Theory II) [C- minimum grade required]

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 312 - Theory of 20th Century Music - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Twentieth-century music materials: mixed and complex meter, modes and modal harmonies, mixed modes, 5-, 6-, and 8-note scales, exotic scales, non-tertian harmonies, upper tertians and combined chords, polychords and polytonality, pitch class sets, interval vectors and serialism parallelism, pandiatonicism, etc.

Note: MUS 314 taken concurrently is strongly recommended.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 312 (Theory of 20th Century Music) or MUS 256

Prerequisites: MUS212 (Music Theory II) [C- minimum grade required] and MUS 213 (Aural and Keyboard Skills I) [C- minimum grade required]

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 313 - Aural and Keyboard Skills for 19th Century Music Theory - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

The aural perception of 19th century music through the practice of sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony.

Note: MUS 311 taken concurrently is strongly recommended.

Prerequisites: MUS 214 (Aural and Keyboard Skills II) [C- minimum grade required]

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 314 - Aural and Keyboard Skills for 20th Century Music Theory - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

The aural perception of 20th century music through the practice of sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony.

Note: MUS 312 taken concurrently is strongly recommended.

Prerequisites: MUS 214 (Aural and Keyboard Skills II) [C- minimum grade required]

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 315 - Arranging - 3 (1-2s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduction to arranging music based on traditional models, including scoring, harmonization, instrumentation, and orchestration.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 315 (Arranging) or MUS 259

Prerequisites: MUS212 (Music Theory II) and MUS 214 (Aural and Keyboard Skills II)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 316 - Composition - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Compositional techniques of the twentieth and twenty-first century, including modality, additive chord structures, asymmetric and complex meter, pitch cells and the like.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 316 (Composition) or MUS 260

Prerequisites: MUS212 (Music Theory II) and MUS 214 (Aural and Keyboard Skills II)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 321 - Introduction to Conducting - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Conducting skills are studied and developed, including baton technique, preparation, downbeat, releases, beat patterns, musical style, fermatas, cues, left hand independence, tempo changes, score preparation, instrumental and choral rehearsal techniques, and related topics.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 321 (Introduction to Conducting) or MUS 232

Corequisites: MUS 211 (Music Theory I) and MUS 213 (Aural and Keyboard Skills I)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 361 - Choral and Vocal Methods - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The vocal mechanism, vocal/choral tone, diction, vocal development, children's and changing voices, planning and techniques for choral or rehearsal and/or vocal studio.

Note: Choral or vocal MUP course is recommended as a prerequisite.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 361 (Choral and Vocal Methods) or MUS 230

Prerequisites: MUS 211 (Music Theory I) and MUS 213 (Aural and Keyboard Skills I)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 362 - Vocal Diction - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Designed to develop the skill of using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), to develop the ability to sing with clear, accurate diction in English and German, and to develop an awareness of how excellent diction can heighten the quality of a musical performance.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Corequisites: MUP 226 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) or MUP 227 (Applied Music (Primary)) or MUP 326 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) or MUP 327 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) or MUP 426 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) or MUP 427 (Applied Music (Primary Area))

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Music (Applied) 127 (Voice)

MUS 363 - Vocal Diction II: French/Italian Diction - 3 (1.5-0-1.5)
Faculty of Arts

The primary goals of the course are to continue developing the skill of using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), to develop the ability to sing with clear, accurate diction in Italian, and French, and to develop an awareness of how excellent diction can heighten the quality of a musical performance.

Prerequisites: MUS 362 (Vocal Diction)

Corequisites: MUP 226 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) or MUP 227 (Applied Music (Primary)) or MUP 326 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) or MUP 327 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) or MUP 426 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) or MUP 427 (Applied Music (Primary Area))

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 372 - Vocal Pedagogy - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students registered in Vocal Pedagogy will study in depth the anatomy of singing, with focus on proper posture, the breathing mechanism, resonance, the larynx, vocal registration, and healthy singing. Students will also gain knowledge that will help them with their own vocal instruction, and will get a taste at teaching their own voice student throughout the duration of this class.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 372 (Vocal Pedagogy) or MUS 300 or MUS 303 or MUS 373 (Studies in Music Pedagogy: Piano Pedagogy)

Prerequisites: MUS 211 (Music Theory I) and MUS 213 (Aural and Keyboard Skills I) and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: MUP 226 or higher (Voice)

MUS 373 - Studies in Music Pedagogy: Piano Pedagogy - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Designed for the studio teacher, this course includes setting up a studio (including business aspects), and how to teach aspects of technique, musicianship, and repertoire appropriate to the medium. A study of repertoire from beginners' books to standard works and graded series is included.

Note: This course is part of the MUS 370 Series: Studies in Music Pedagogy.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 373 (Studies in Music Pedagogy: Piano Pedagogy) or MUS 300 or MUS 303 or MUS 372 (Vocal Pedagogy)

Prerequisites: MUS 211 (Music Theory I) and MUS 213 (Aural and Keyboard Skills I) and MUP 226 (Applied Music (Primary Area)) or Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 380 - Vocal Literature - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students registered in Vocal Literature will be studying music written for the voice from the beginning of recorded musical history until the present. Students will be given an overview of vocal music from the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, 20th century, and contemporary periods. This class will focus on the composers who wrote music during each period, the style of vocal music that evolved from each of these periods as well as an overview of the vocal output.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: MUP 127 or higher (Voice)

MUS 395 - Church Music Practicum/Project Preparation - 1.5 (0-1.5s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Preparation and research towards a chosen project, or regular observance of/communication with a church musician.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 396 - Church Music Practicum/Project - 1.5 (0-0-1.5)
Faculty of Arts

Church music practicum or project, as outlined in MUS 395.

Prerequisites: MUS 395 (Church Music Practicum/Project Preparation)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 415 - Advanced Composition I - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private composition lessons.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 415 (Advanced Composition I) or MUS 359

Prerequisites: MUS 316 (Composition)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 416 - Advanced Composition II - 1.5 (1-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Private composition lessons.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUS 416 (Advanced Composition II) or MUS 360

Prerequisites: MUS 415 (Advanced Composition I) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 490 - Topics in Music - 3 (0-1.5s-1.5)
Faculty of Arts

Seminar on diverse topics in the field.

Note: Open only to Music concentrations and majors.

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 495 - Senior Music Project Preparation - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Preparation and research for a senior project under a project supervisor.

Prerequisites: MUS 490 (Topics in Music) and 4th year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MUS 496 - Senior Music Project - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Senior project under a project supervisor.

Prerequisites: MUS 495 (Senior Music Project Preparation)

Further information: Course availability and times

Music Education

MUED213 - Music Education for Young Children - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

Introduction to music education, including pedagogical practices and materials that apply to the development of musical knowledge and understanding with young children ages 3-7. A combination of the fundamentals of Kodaly and Orff Schulwerk as they are applied to early childhood music pedagogy will be introduced.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUED213 (Music Education for Young Children) or MUED212

Prerequisites: MUS 100 (Rudiments of Music) or MUS 111 or MUS 120 (Advanced Rudiments of Music) or MUS 211 (Music Theory I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MUED214 - Music Literacy for Children - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

Introduction to music education, including pedagogical practices and materials that apply to the development of music literacy with children ages 8-12. The fundamentals of Kodaly and Orff Schulwerk will be applied to the development of musical understanding with older children.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUED214 (Music Literacy for Children) or MUED212

Prerequisites: MUS 100 (Rudiments of Music) or MUS 111 or MUS 120 (Advanced Rudiments of Music) or MUS 211 (Music Theory I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

MUED264 - Handbells and Handchimes for Children and Youth - 3 (1.5-0-1.5)
Faculty of Arts

This course will allow participants to develop pedagogical skills in order to successfully plan and teach a handbell program in a school or community setting. Development of teaching techniques includes full immersion into handbells and handchimes with hands-on experience for musical precision and team building combined with an overall knowledge base of the instrument.

Prerequisites: MUS 100 (Rudiments of Music) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Music Ensemble

MUP 142 - Choral Ensemble - 1.5 (0-4.5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a choral ensemble which develops vocal techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of choral literature. The Concordia Concert Choir, through regular practice and rehearsal, prepares for extensive performance both locally and regionally in concert and worship settings.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 142 (Choral Ensemble) or MUS 142

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 143 - Choral Ensemble - 1.5 (0-4.5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a choral ensemble which develops vocal techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of choral literature. The Concordia Concert Choir, through regular practice and rehearsal, prepares for extensive performance both locally and regionally in concert and worship settings.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 143 (Choral Ensemble) or MUS 143

Prerequisites: MUP 142 (Choral Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 162 - Chamber Music Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Applied music study of the technical and interpretive aspects of small ensemble repertoire.

Prerequisites: MUS 120 (Advanced Rudiments of Music) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 163 - Chamber Music Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Applied music study of the technical and interpretive aspects of small ensemble repertoire.

Prerequisites: MUP 162 (Chamber Music Ensemble) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 164 - Handbell Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia handbell ensemble. These ensembles develop handbell techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of handbell literature. Through regular practice and rehearsal, they prepare for performance both locally and on tour.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 164 (Handbell Ensemble) or MUS 164

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 165 - Handbell Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia handbell ensemble. These ensembles develop handbell techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of handbell literature. Through regular practice and rehearsal, they prepare for performance both locally and on tour.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 165 (Handbell Ensemble) or MUS 165

Prerequisites: MUP 164 (Handbell Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 166 - Symphony Orchestra - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in the Concordia Symphony Orchestra (or other approved orchestral ensemble) which develops instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of symphonic literature. The Concordia Symphony Orchestra also involves community musicians.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 167 - Symphony Orchestra - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in the Concordia Symphony Orchestra (or other approved orchestral ensemble) which develops instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of symphonic literature. The Concordia Symphony Orchestra also involves community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 166 (Symphony Orchestra)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 168 - Wind Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia accredited wind ensemble. These ensembles develop instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of wind literature. They also involve community musicians.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 168 (Wind Ensemble ) or MUS 168

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 169 - Wind Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia accredited wind ensemble. These ensembles develop instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of wind literature. They also involve community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 168 (Wind Ensemble )

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 242 - Choral Ensemble - 1.5 (0-4.5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a choral ensemble which develops vocal techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of choral literature. The Concordia Concert Choir, through regular practice and rehearsal, prepares for extensive performance both locally and regionally in concert and worship settings.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 242 (Choral Ensemble) or MUS 242

Prerequisites: MUP 143 (Choral Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 243 - Choral Ensemble - 1.5 (0-4.5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a choral ensemble which develops vocal techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of choral literature. The Concordia Concert Choir, through regular practice and rehearsal, prepares for extensive performance both locally and regionally in concert and worship settings.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 243 (Choral Ensemble) or MUS 243

Prerequisites: MUP 242 (Choral Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 262 - Chamber Music Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Applied music study of the technical and interpretive aspects of small ensemble repertoire.

Prerequisites: MUP 163 (Chamber Music Ensemble) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 263 - Chamber Music Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Applied music study of the technical and interpretive aspects of small ensemble repertoire.

Prerequisites: MUP 262 (Chamber Music Ensemble) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 264 - Handbell Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia handbell ensemble. These ensembles develop handbell techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of handbell literature. Through regular practice and rehearsal, they prepare for performance both locally and on tour.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 264 (Handbell Ensemble) or MUS 264

Prerequisites: MUP 165 (Handbell Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 265 - Handbell Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia handbell ensemble. These ensembles develop handbell techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of handbell literature. Through regular practice and rehearsal, they prepare for performance both locally and on tour.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 265 (Handbell Ensemble) or MUS 265

Prerequisites: MUP 264 (Handbell Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 266 - Symphony Orchestra - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in the Concordia Symphony Orchestra (or other approved orchestral ensemble) which develops instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of symphonic literature. The Concordia Symphony Orchestra also involves community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 167 (Symphony Orchestra)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 267 - Symphony Orchestra - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in the Concordia Symphony Orchestra (or other approved orchestral ensemble) which develops instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of symphonic literature. The Concordia Symphony Orchestra also involves community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 266 (Symphony Orchestra)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 268 - Wind Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia accredited wind ensemble. These ensembles develop instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of wind literature. They also involve community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 169 (Wind Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 269 - Wind Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia accredited wind ensemble. These ensembles develop instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of wind literature. They also involve community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 268 (Wind Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 342 - Choral Ensemble - 1.5 (0-4.5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a choral ensemble which develops vocal techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of choral literature. The Concordia Concert Choir, through regular practice and rehearsal, prepares for extensive performance both locally and regionally in concert and worship settings.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 342 (Choral Ensemble) or MUS 342

Prerequisites: MUP 243 (Choral Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 343 - Choral Ensemble - 1.5 (0-4.5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a choral ensemble which develops vocal techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of choral literature. The Concordia Concert Choir, through regular practice and rehearsal, prepares for extensive performance both locally and regionally in concert and worship settings.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 343 (Choral Ensemble) or MUS 343

Prerequisites: MUP 342 (Choral Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 362 - Chamber Music Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Applied music study of the technical and interpretive aspects of small ensemble repertoire.

Prerequisites: MUP 263 (Chamber Music Ensemble) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 363 - Chamber Music Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Applied music study of the technical and interpretive aspects of small ensemble repertoire.

Prerequisites: MUP 362 (Chamber Music Ensemble) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 364 - Handbell Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia handbell ensemble. These ensembles develop handbell techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of handbell literature. Through regular practice and rehearsal, they prepare for performance both locally and on tour.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 364 (Handbell Ensemble) or MUS 364

Prerequisites: MUP 265 (Handbell Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 365 - Handbell Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia handbell ensemble. These ensembles develop handbell techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of handbell literature. Through regular practice and rehearsal, they prepare for performance both locally and on tour.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 365 (Handbell Ensemble) or MUS 365

Prerequisites: MUP 364 (Handbell Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 366 - Symphony Orchestra - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in the Concordia Symphony Orchestra (or other approved orchestral ensemble) which develops instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of symphonic literature. The Concordia Symphony Orchestra also involves community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 267 (Symphony Orchestra)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 367 - Symphony Orchestra - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in the Concordia Symphony Orchestra (or other approved orchestral ensemble) which develops instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of symphonic literature. The Concordia Symphony Orchestra also involves community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 366 (Symphony Orchestra)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 368 - Wind Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia accredited wind ensemble. These ensembles develop instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of wind literature. They also involve community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 269 (Wind Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 369 - Wind Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia accredited wind ensemble. These ensembles develop instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of wind literature. They also involve community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 368 (Wind Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 442 - Choral Ensemble - 1.5 (0-4.5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a choral ensemble which develops vocal techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of choral literature. The Concordia Concert Choir, through regular practice and rehearsal, prepares for extensive performance both locally and regionally in concert and worship settings.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 442 (Choral Ensemble) or MUS 442

Prerequisites: MUP 343 (Choral Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 443 - Choral Ensemble - 1.5 (0-4.5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a choral ensemble which develops vocal techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of choral literature. The Concordia Concert Choir, through regular practice and rehearsal, prepares for extensive performance both locally and regionally in concert and worship settings.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 443 (Choral Ensemble) or MUS 443

Prerequisites: MUP 442 (Choral Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 462 - Chamber Music Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Applied music study of the technical and interpretive aspects of small ensemble repertoire.

Prerequisites: MUP 363 (Chamber Music Ensemble) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 463 - Chamber Music Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Applied music study of the technical and interpretive aspects of small ensemble repertoire.

Prerequisites: MUP 462 (Chamber Music Ensemble) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 464 - Handbell Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia handbell ensemble. These ensembles develop handbell techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of handbell literature. Through regular practice and rehearsal, they prepare for performance both locally and on tour.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 464 (Handbell Ensemble) or MUS 464

Prerequisites: MUP 365 (Handbell Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 465 - Handbell Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia handbell ensemble. These ensembles develop handbell techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of handbell literature. Through regular practice and rehearsal, they prepare for performance both locally and on tour.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of MUP 465 (Handbell Ensemble) or MUS 465

Prerequisites: MUP 464 (Handbell Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 466 - Symphony Orchestra - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in the Concordia Symphony Orchestra (or other approved orchestral ensemble) which develops instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of symphonic literature. The Concordia Symphony Orchestra also involves community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 367 (Symphony Orchestra)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 467 - Symphony Orchestra - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in the Concordia Symphony Orchestra (or other approved orchestral ensemble) which develops instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of symphonic literature. The Concordia Symphony Orchestra also involves community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 466 (Symphony Orchestra)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 468 - Wind Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia accredited wind ensemble. These ensembles develop instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of wind literature. They also involve community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 369 (Wind Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

MUP 469 - Wind Ensemble - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Participation in a Concordia accredited wind ensemble. These ensembles develop instrumental techniques, musicianship, and reading skills through the study of a variety of wind literature. They also involve community musicians.

Prerequisites: MUP 468 (Wind Ensemble)

Further information: Course availability and times

Native Studies

NS 152 - Introductory Cree - 6 (4-0-1)
Faculty of Arts

An overview of the Plains Cree language beginning with the Cree sound system, basic conversation, the basics of the structure of the Cree language, and writing of the Cree language using Roman orthography.

Note: Not open to students with matriculation standing in Cree. This course is not currently being offered.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of NS 152 (Introductory Cree) or (30-level Cree or equivalent)

Further information: Course availability and times

Philosophy

PHIL101 - Introduction to Ethics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to the discipline of philosophy through philosophical analysis of controversial political and ethical issues. Topics may include the ethics of suicide, abortion, euthanasia, censorship, war and violence, capital punishment, sexuality, and the environment. Will include introductions to the most prominent basic ethical theories in the history of philosophy.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL101 (Introduction to Ethics) or PHIL160 or PHIL201 (Introduction to Ethics)

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL102 - Introduction to Philosophy - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to the methodology and subject matter of philosophy. An overview that explores philosophy's various sub-disciplines. Special attention to the nature of reality and our knowledge of it.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL102 (Introduction to Philosophy) or PHIL202 (Introduction to Philosophy)

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL125 - Introduction to Logic - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Elementary methods and principles for analysing reasoning as it occurs in everyday contexts. Topics are likely to include argument analysis and construction, deductive and inductive reasoning, informal fallacies, categorical logic, sentential logic. May use computer-assisted instruction.

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL200 - Metaphysics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A philosophical discussion of several basic questions concerning the nature of reality. Topics may include freedom and determinism, the mind-body problem, space and time, universals and particulars, realism and anti-realism.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL200 (Metaphysics) or PHIL400 (The Philosopher's Craft: Metaphysics)

Prerequisites: Philosophy (3) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL201 - Introduction to Ethics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A senior-level introduction to the discipline of philosophy through philosophical analysis of controversial political and ethical issues. Topics may include the ethics of suicide, abortion, euthanasia, censorship, war and violence, capital punishment, sexuality, and the environment. Will include introductions to the most prominent basic ethical theories in the history of philosophy.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL201 (Introduction to Ethics) or PHIL101 (Introduction to Ethics) or PHIL160

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL202 - Introduction to Philosophy - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A senior-level introduction to the methodology and subject matter of philosophy. An overview that explores philosophy's various sub-disciplines. Special attention to the nature of reality and our knowledge of it.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL202 (Introduction to Philosophy) or PHIL102 (Introduction to Philosophy)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL215 - Epistemology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduction to the theory of knowledge. What is knowledge? Under what circumstances does a person know something? How is knowledge acquired? When is a belief, or set of beliefs, justified or warranted or rational?

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL215 (Epistemology) or PHIL415 (The Philosopher's Craft: Epistemology)

Prerequisites: Philosophy (3) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL220 - Symbolic Logic - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A quick review of sentential logic, a detailed study of predicate logic, and an introduction to more advanced topics (e.g., modal logic, and "metalogical" issues and theorems). May use computer-assisted instruction.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL220 (Symbolic Logic) or MAT 220 (Symbolic Logic) or PHIL420 (The Philosopher's Craft: Symbolic Logic)

Prerequisites: MAT 200 (Foundations of Mathematics) or PHIL125 (Introduction to Logic) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL240 - Western Philosophy - Ancient and Medieval - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to some of the main problems and theories that have dominated philosophical thought in the Western world, through study and critical discussion of selected philosophical classics from the ancient and medieval periods. Readings include a major work of Plato or Aristotle and a major work of Augustine, Anselm, or Aquinas.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL240 (Western Philosophy - Ancient and Medieval) or PHIL140

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL241 - Western Philosophy - Modern - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to some of the main problems and theories that have dominated philosophical thought in the Western world, through study and critical discussion of selected philosophical classics from the modern period. Readings include a major work of Descartes, Leibnitz, Spinoza, or Pascal and a major work of Locke, Berkeley, Hume, or Reid.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL241 (Western Philosophy - Modern) or PHIL140

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL250 - Foundations of Ethics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An examination of foundational questions of right and wrong, good and evil, the nature of happiness/human well-being, and reasons for action, accomplished through a study of the competing ethical theories of philosophers such as Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, and Mill. Discussion of the doctrine of Ethical Relativism forms a substantial contemporary component of the course.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL250 (Foundations of Ethics) or PHIL450 (The Philosopher's Craft: Foundations of Ethics)

Prerequisites: Philosophy (3) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL260 - Philosophy of Human Nature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The most important theories of human nature found in the histories of philosophy, theology, psychology, and biology. Selections from representative authors such as Plato, Aristotle, Mencius, Biblical authors, Augustine, Seneca, Aquinas, Descartes, Hume, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Sartre, Beauvoir, Skinner, Lorenz, and Wilson.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL260 (Philosophy of Human Nature) or PHIL460 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Human Nature)

Prerequisites: Philosophy (3) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL265 - Philosophy of Science - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduction to the philosophical analysis of science. What distinguishes science from non-science? What is the basic methodology or logic of science? Are the conclusions drawn by scientists warranted, particularly those regarding things that are not directly observable? If so, how?

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL265 (Philosophy of Science) or PHIL465 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Science)

Prerequisites: Philosophy (3) or Science (3) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL270 - Political Philosophy - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course is intended to provide students with a thorough historical survey of political theories which fundamentally inform the Western tradition. The core concepts of political philosophy will be examined through a close reading of primary texts. Students will be provided with a firm grounding in political theory through study and a critical discussion of these philosophical classics. Studied texts will include Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Politics, Machiavelli's Prince, Marx's Manifesto, and Rawls' Theory of Justice.

Note: 3 credits of Philosophy or Political Science is recommended as a prerequisite.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL270 (Political Philosophy) or PHIL470 (The Philosopher's Craft: Political Philosophy) or PSCI270 (Political Philosophy)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL275 - Reasoning: Scientific and Religious - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The purposes of this course are to compare the reasoning and methodology found in science with those found in religion, and to consider whether and how religious considerations could rightly be used in science, and vice versa. The course begins with an analysis of scientific reasoning and methodology, drawing from contemporary philosophy of science. It then examines, for the sake of comparison, examples of religious reasoning drawn from contemporary philosophy of religion and theology.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL275 (Reasoning: Scientific and Religious) or PHIL475 (The Philosopher's Craft: Reasoning - Scientific and Religious) or REL 275 (Reasoning: Scientific and Religious)

Prerequisites: REL 101 (Western Religious Traditions) or REL 150 (Introduction to the Christian Faith) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL282 - Free Will and Determinism - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Is free will an illusion? Is determinism founded upon fallacy? These two
questions will guide our investigation of the debate between libertarians and determinists. Key terms will be defined and the main views on both sides of the debate will be explained as we try to ascertain which side, if either, has the stronger arguments in its favour.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL282 (Free Will and Determinism) or PHIL482 (The Philosopher's Craft: Free Will and Determinism) or STA 282 or STA 482

Prerequisites: Philosophy (3) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL290 - Philosophy of Religion - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Important problems in the history of philosophic thinking about religion, such as the problem of evil, the question of miracles, and the problem of religious language, among others.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL290 (Philosophy of Religion) or BCS 590 (Philosophy of Religion) or PHIL490 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Religion) or REL 290 (Faith and Reason)

Prerequisites: Philosophy (3) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL400 - The Philosopher's Craft: Metaphysics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An enhanced version of PHIL200, taken as a capstone course in the Philosophy concentration and open to others with prerequisites. Students receive tutorial guidance in the elements of mature philosophical writing to produce a major Philosophy paper of high quality. Since writing this paper is the major component of this course, there will not be a final exam.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL400 (The Philosopher's Craft: Metaphysics) or PHIL200 (Metaphysics) or PHIL415 (The Philosopher's Craft: Epistemology) or PHIL420 (The Philosopher's Craft: Symbolic Logic) or PHIL450 (The Philosopher's Craft: Foundations of Ethics) or PHIL460 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Human Nature) or PHIL465 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Science) or PHIL470 (The Philosopher's Craft: Political Philosophy) or PHIL475 (The Philosopher's Craft: Reasoning - Scientific and Religious) or PHIL490 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Religion)

Prerequisites: (PHIL102 (Introduction to Philosophy) or PHIL202 (Introduction to Philosophy)) and PHIL125 (Introduction to Logic) and Philosophy (6SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL415 - The Philosopher's Craft: Epistemology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An enhanced version of PHIL215, taken as a capstone course in the Philosophy concentration and open to others with prerequisites. Students receive tutorial guidance in the elements of mature philosophical writing to produce a major Philosophy paper of high quality. Since writing this paper is the major component of this course, there will not be a final exam.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL415 (The Philosopher's Craft: Epistemology) or PHIL215 (Epistemology) or PHIL400 (The Philosopher's Craft: Metaphysics) or PHIL420 (The Philosopher's Craft: Symbolic Logic) or PHIL450 (The Philosopher's Craft: Foundations of Ethics) or PHIL460 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Human Nature) or PHIL465 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Science) or PHIL470 (The Philosopher's Craft: Political Philosophy) or PHIL475 (The Philosopher's Craft: Reasoning - Scientific and Religious) or PHIL490 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Religion)

Prerequisites: (PHIL102 (Introduction to Philosophy) or PHIL202 (Introduction to Philosophy)) and PHIL125 (Introduction to Logic) and Philosophy (6SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL420 - The Philosopher's Craft: Symbolic Logic - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An enhanced version of PHIL220, taken as a capstone course in the Philosophy concentration and open to others with prerequisites. Students receive tutorial guidance in the elements of mature philosophical writing to produce a major Philosophy paper of high quality. Since writing this paper is the major component of this course, there will not be a final exam.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL420 (The Philosopher's Craft: Symbolic Logic) or MAT 220 (Symbolic Logic) or PHIL220 (Symbolic Logic) or PHIL400 (The Philosopher's Craft: Metaphysics) or PHIL415 (The Philosopher's Craft: Epistemology) or PHIL450 (The Philosopher's Craft: Foundations of Ethics) or PHIL460 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Human Nature) or PHIL465 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Science) or PHIL470 (The Philosopher's Craft: Political Philosophy) or PHIL475 (The Philosopher's Craft: Reasoning - Scientific and Religious) or PHIL490 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Religion)

Prerequisites: (PHIL102 (Introduction to Philosophy) or PHIL202 (Introduction to Philosophy)) and PHIL125 (Introduction to Logic) and Philosophy (6SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL450 - The Philosopher's Craft: Foundations of Ethics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An enhanced version of PHIL250, taken as a capstone course in the Philosophy concentration and open to others with prerequisites. Students receive tutorial guidance in the elements of mature philosophical writing to produce a major Philosophy paper of high quality. Since writing this paper is the major component of this course, there will not be a final exam.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL450 (The Philosopher's Craft: Foundations of Ethics) or PHIL250 (Foundations of Ethics) or PHIL400 (The Philosopher's Craft: Metaphysics) or PHIL415 (The Philosopher's Craft: Epistemology) or PHIL420 (The Philosopher's Craft: Symbolic Logic) or PHIL460 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Human Nature) or PHIL465 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Science) or PHIL470 (The Philosopher's Craft: Political Philosophy) or PHIL475 (The Philosopher's Craft: Reasoning - Scientific and Religious) or PHIL490 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Religion)

Prerequisites: (PHIL102 (Introduction to Philosophy) or PHIL202 (Introduction to Philosophy)) and PHIL125 (Introduction to Logic) and Philosophy (6SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL460 - The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Human Nature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An enhanced version of PHIL260, taken as a capstone course in the Philosophy concentration and open to others with prerequisites. Students receive tutorial guidance in the elements of mature philosophical writing to produce a major Philosophy paper of high quality. Since writing this paper is the major component of this course, there will not be a final exam.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL460 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Human Nature) or PHIL260 (Philosophy of Human Nature) or PHIL400 (The Philosopher's Craft: Metaphysics) or PHIL415 (The Philosopher's Craft: Epistemology) or PHIL420 (The Philosopher's Craft: Symbolic Logic) or PHIL450 (The Philosopher's Craft: Foundations of Ethics) or PHIL465 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Science) or PHIL470 (The Philosopher's Craft: Political Philosophy) or PHIL475 (The Philosopher's Craft: Reasoning - Scientific and Religious) or PHIL490 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Religion)

Prerequisites: (PHIL102 (Introduction to Philosophy) or PHIL202 (Introduction to Philosophy)) and PHIL125 (Introduction to Logic) and Philosophy (6SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL465 - The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Science - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An enhanced version of PHIL265, taken as a capstone course in the Philosophy concentration and open to others with prerequisites. Students receive tutorial guidance in the elements of mature philosophical writing to produce a major Philosophy paper of high quality. Since writing this paper is the major component of this course, there will not be a final exam.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL465 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Science) or PHIL265 (Philosophy of Science) or PHIL400 (The Philosopher's Craft: Metaphysics) or PHIL415 (The Philosopher's Craft: Epistemology) or PHIL420 (The Philosopher's Craft: Symbolic Logic) or PHIL450 (The Philosopher's Craft: Foundations of Ethics) or PHIL460 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Human Nature) or PHIL470 (The Philosopher's Craft: Political Philosophy) or PHIL475 (The Philosopher's Craft: Reasoning - Scientific and Religious) or PHIL490 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Religion)

Prerequisites: (PHIL102 (Introduction to Philosophy) or PHIL202 (Introduction to Philosophy)) and PHIL125 (Introduction to Logic) and Philosophy (6SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL470 - The Philosopher's Craft: Political Philosophy - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An enhanced version of PHIL270, taken as a capstone course in the Philosophy concentration and open to others with prerequisites. Students receive tutorial guidance in the elements of mature philosophical writing to produce a major Philosophy paper of high quality. Since writing this paper is the major component of this course, there will not be a final exam.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL470 (The Philosopher's Craft: Political Philosophy) or PHIL270 (Political Philosophy) or PHIL400 (The Philosopher's Craft: Metaphysics) or PHIL415 (The Philosopher's Craft: Epistemology) or PHIL420 (The Philosopher's Craft: Symbolic Logic) or PHIL450 (The Philosopher's Craft: Foundations of Ethics) or PHIL460 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Human Nature) or PHIL465 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Science) or PHIL475 (The Philosopher's Craft: Reasoning - Scientific and Religious) or PHIL490 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Religion) or PSCI270 (Political Philosophy)

Prerequisites: (PHIL102 (Introduction to Philosophy) or PHIL202 (Introduction to Philosophy)) and PHIL125 (Introduction to Logic) and Philosophy (6SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL475 - The Philosopher's Craft: Reasoning - Scientific and Religious - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An enhanced version of PHIL275, taken as a capstone course in the Philosophy concentration and open to others with prerequisites. Students receive tutorial guidance in the elements of mature philosophical writing to produce a major Philosophy paper of high quality. Since writing this paper is the major component of this course, there will not be a final exam.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL475 (The Philosopher's Craft: Reasoning - Scientific and Religious) or PHIL275 (Reasoning: Scientific and Religious) or PHIL400 (The Philosopher's Craft: Metaphysics) or PHIL415 (The Philosopher's Craft: Epistemology) or PHIL420 (The Philosopher's Craft: Symbolic Logic) or PHIL450 (The Philosopher's Craft: Foundations of Ethics) or PHIL460 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Human Nature) or PHIL465 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Science) or PHIL470 (The Philosopher's Craft: Political Philosophy) or PHIL490 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Religion) or REL 275 (Reasoning: Scientific and Religious)

Prerequisites: (PHIL102 (Introduction to Philosophy) or PHIL202 (Introduction to Philosophy)) and PHIL125 (Introduction to Logic) and Philosophy (6SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL482 - The Philosopher's Craft: Free Will and Determinism - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An enhanced version of PHIL282, taken as a capstone course in the
Philosophy concentration and open to others with prerequisites. Students receive tutorial guidance in the elements of mature philosophical writing to produce a major Philosophy paper of high quality.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL482 (The Philosopher's Craft: Free Will and Determinism) or PHIL282 (Free Will and Determinism) or STA 282 or STA 482

Prerequisites: PHIL102 (Introduction to Philosophy) and PHIL125 (Introduction to Logic) and Philosophy (6SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHIL490 - The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Religion - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An enhanced version of PHIL290, taken as a capstone course in the Philosophy
concentration and open to others with prerequisites. Students receive tutorial guidance in the elements of mature philosophical writing to produce a major Philosophy paper of high quality. Since writing this paper is the major component of this course, there will not be a final exam.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHIL490 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Religion) or BCS 590 (Philosophy of Religion) or PHIL290 (Philosophy of Religion) or PHIL400 (The Philosopher's Craft: Metaphysics) or PHIL415 (The Philosopher's Craft: Epistemology) or PHIL420 (The Philosopher's Craft: Symbolic Logic) or PHIL450 (The Philosopher's Craft: Foundations of Ethics) or PHIL460 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Human Nature) or PHIL465 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Science) or PHIL470 (The Philosopher's Craft: Political Philosophy) or PHIL475 (The Philosopher's Craft: Reasoning - Scientific and Religious) or REL 290 (Faith and Reason)

Prerequisites: (PHIL102 (Introduction to Philosophy) or PHIL202 (Introduction to Philosophy)) and PHIL125 (Introduction to Logic) and Philosophy (6SR) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHILXXX - Special Topics in Philosophy - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course allows students the opportunity to study a topic in music not covered by, or in greater depth that, other courses in Concordia's curriculum.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Will vary

Physical Activity

PACT111 - Basketball - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Through active involvement students will acquire theoretical knowledge, physical skills, and pedagogy used in the performance and instruction of the basics of basketball.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PACT111 (Basketball) or PAC 111 or PAT 111 (Intercollegiate Basketball)

Further information: Course availability and times

PACT118 - Soccer - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Through active involvement students will acquire theoretical knowledge, physical skills, and pedagogy used in the performance and instruction of the basics of soccer.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PACT118 (Soccer) or PAC 118 or PAT 118 (Intercollegiate Soccer)

Further information: Course availability and times

PACT131 - Badminton - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Through active involvement students will acquire theoretical knowledge, physical skills, and pedagogy used in the performance and instruction of the basics of badminton. Students must supply their own racquets.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PACT131 (Badminton) or PAC 131 or PAT 131 (Intercollegiate Badminton)

Further information: Course availability and times

PAC 135 - Tennis - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Acquisition of theoretical knowledge and personal skill in the basic tennis strokes (forehand, backhand, serve, and volley) and strategies. Students must provide their own equipment.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Further information: Course availability and times

PACT137 - Volleyball - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Through active involvement students will acquire theoretical knowledge, physical skills, and pedagogy used in the performance and instruction of the basics of volleyball.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PACT137 (Volleyball) or PAC 137 or PAT 137 or PAT 138 (Intercollegiate Volleyball)

Further information: Course availability and times

PAC 181 - Cross Country Skiing - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Acquisition of theoretical knowledge and personal skill in classical/skiing and hill manoeuvres. One required day trip will be scheduled on a weekend during the course. Students must supply their own equipment.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Further information: Course availability and times

PACT240 - Cooperative Games in Physical Education - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Through active involvement students will be introduced to the theoretical knowledge, physical skills, and pedagogy used in cooperative games in physical education.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PACT250 - Outdoor Education - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Through active involvement students will be introduced to the theoretical knowledge, physical skills, and pedagogy used in a variety of physical activities in the outdoor environment.

Note: An additional fee is charged (Section 5.1).

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PAC 299 - Curling - 1.5 (0-1.5L-1.5)
Faculty of Education

Personal skill acquisition in delivery, sweeping, specific shots, and strategies.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Physical Activity Team

PAT 111 - Intercollegiate Basketball - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Education

Athletic performance in basketball including required participation in all scheduled team events.

Note: A 3-credit course offered over the full academic year.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PAT 111 (Intercollegiate Basketball) or PACT111 (Basketball) or PAC 111

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PAT 118 - Intercollegiate Soccer - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Athletic performance in soccer including required participation in all scheduled team events.

Note: A 1.5-credit course offered over the Fall semester.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PAT 118 (Intercollegiate Soccer) or PACT118 (Soccer) or PAC 118

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PAT 131 - Intercollegiate Badminton - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Athletic performance in badminton including required participation in all scheduled team events.

Note: A 1.5-credit course offered over the full academic year.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PAT 131 (Intercollegiate Badminton) or PACT131 (Badminton) or PAC 131

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PAT 138 - Intercollegiate Volleyball - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Education

Athletic performance in volleyball including required participation in all scheduled team events.

Note: A 3-credit course offered over the full academic year.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PAT 138 (Intercollegiate Volleyball) or PACT137 (Volleyball) or PAC 137 or PAT 137

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PAT 147 - Intercollegiate Ice Hockey - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Education

Athletic performance in ice hockey including required participation in all scheduled team events.

Note: A 3-credit course offered over the full academic year.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PAT 148 - Intercollegiate Cross Country Running - 1.5 (0-1.5L-0)
Faculty of Education

This course is designed to offer students skills, theory and practical development fundamental to a competitive environment in the sport of cross country running. Athletic performance in in cross country running including required participation in all scheduled team events.

Note: A 1.5-credit course offered over the Fall semester.

Prerequisites: Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PAT 211 - Intercollegiate Basketball - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Education

Athletic performance in basketball including required participation in all scheduled team events.

Note: A 3-credit course offered over the full academic year.

Prerequisites: PACT111 (Basketball) or PAC 111 or PAT 111 (Intercollegiate Basketball) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PAT 218 - Intercollegiate Soccer - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Athletic performance in soccer including required participation in all scheduled team events.

Note: A 1.5-credit course offered over the Fall semester.

Prerequisites: PACT118 (Soccer) or PAC 118 or PAT 118 (Intercollegiate Soccer) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PAT 231 - Intercollegiate Badminton - 1.5 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Athletic performance in badminton including required participation in all scheduled team events.

Note: A 1.5-credit course offered over the full academic year.

Prerequisites: PACT131 (Badminton) or PAC 131 or PAT 131 (Intercollegiate Badminton) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PAT 238 - Intercollegiate Volleyball - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Education

Athletic performance in volleyball including required participation in all scheduled team events.

Note: A 3-credit course offered over the full academic year.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PAT 238 (Intercollegiate Volleyball) or PAT 237

Prerequisites: PACT 137 or PAC 137 or PAT 137 or PAT 138 (Intercollegiate Volleyball) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PAT 247 - Intercollegiate Ice Hockey - 3 (0-6L-0)
Faculty of Education

Athletic performance in ice hockey including required participation in all scheduled team events.

Note: A 3-credit course offered over the full academic year.

Prerequisites: PAT 147 (Intercollegiate Ice Hockey) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PAT 248 - Intercollegiate Cross Country Running - 1.5 (0-1.5L-0)
Faculty of Education

This course is designed to offer students advanced skill, theory and practical development fundamental to an advanced competitive environment in the sport of cross country running. Athletic performance in cross country running including required participation in all scheduled team events.

Note: A 1.5-credit course offered over the Fall semester.

Prerequisites: PAT 148 (Intercollegiate Cross Country Running) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

Physical Education and Sports Studies

PESS 101 - Introduction to Physical Education, Health, and Wellness - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to the disciplines within the broad field of health and wellness, with topics covering personal and societal foci. Topics include historical foundations of physical education, nutrition, environmental conditions, fitness, and sport.

Further information: Course availability and times

PESS 201 - Human Growth and Motor Development Across the Lifespan - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This motor development and learning course focuses on the study of terminology, concepts, and principles appropriate to learning, growth, and development, and to skills acquisition in a variety of sport activities. It is a course that approaches motor development across the lifespan. Information is presented that is important to individuals preparing for a career involving movement. Attention is given to information that recognizes individual differences (both mental and physical).

Prerequisites: PESS 101 and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PESS 245 - Introduction to Coaching - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

The principles of coaching as they relate to the development of the athlete, the role of the coach, and the organization of sport in contemporary society. The course will include Part A and Part B Theory of the National Coaching Certification Program.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PESS 293 - Introduction to the Movement Activities of Children Aged 5-12 - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Education

Free play and organized physical activities of children 5-12 in recreational, educational, and sports environments. Involves practical physical activity and the observation of children.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PESS 293 (Introduction to the Movement Activities of Children Aged 5-12) or PESS292 or PESS293

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PESS 301 - Foundations of Human Movement - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

An examination of human movement capacities through the study of functional anatomy, exercise physiology, motor control, and biomechanics and their interrelationships.

Prerequisites: PESS 101 and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PESS 345 - Introduction to Sports Management - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Education

An introduction to the management of physical activity, recreation, and sport.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Physics

PHY 111 - Introduction to University Physics I - 3 (3-1s-3)
Faculty of Science

An algebra-based course in Physics for students without credit in Physics 30. Physical measurements, errors. Basic mechanics: vectors, kinematics and dynamics of particles, forces in equilibrium, linear and rotational motion, conservation of energy, and linear momentum. Solids and fluids.

Note: Not open to students with credit in Physics 30.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHY 111 (Introduction to University Physics I) or (Physics 30 or equivalent) or PHY 121 (Introductory General Physics I) or PHY 131 (Basic Physics I)

Prerequisites: (Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) or (Math 30-2 or equivalent)

Further information: Course availability and times

PHY 112 - Introduction to University Physics II - 3 (3-1s-3)
Faculty of Science

An algebra-based course in Physics. Oscillations, waves, sound, light. Geometrical optics--optical instruments. Physical optics--interference. Basic DC electricity. Basic thermal physics.

Note: PHY 112 may not be taken for credit toward the Physics minor.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHY 112 (Introduction to University Physics II) or PHY 122 (Introductory General Physics II) or PHY 132 (Basic Physics II)

Prerequisites: PHY 111 (Introduction to University Physics I)

Further information: Course availability and times

PHY 121 - Introductory General Physics I - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

An algebra-based course in Physics for students with credit in Physics 30. Physical measurements, errors. Mechanics: vectors, kinematics and dynamics of particles and extended bodies, forces in equilibrium, linear and rotational motion, conservation of energy and linear momentum. Gravitation. Relativity. Solids and fluids.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHY 121 (Introductory General Physics I) or PHY 111 (Introduction to University Physics I) or PHY 131 (Basic Physics I)

Prerequisites: ((Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) or (Math 30-2 or equivalent) ) and (Physics 30 or equivalent)

Further information: Course availability and times

PHY 122 - Introductory General Physics II - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Science

An algebra-based course in Physics. Oscillations, waves, sound, light. Geometrical optics, physical optics. Basic DC electricity. Basic thermal physics.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHY 122 (Introductory General Physics II) or PHY 112 (Introduction to University Physics II) or PHY 132 (Basic Physics II)

Prerequisites: PHY 111 (Introduction to University Physics I) or PHY 121 (Introductory General Physics I) or PHY 131 (Basic Physics I)

Further information: Course availability and times

PHY 131 - Basic Physics I - 3 (3-1s-3)
Faculty of Science

A calculus-based course in Physics. Physical measurements, errors. Mechanics: vectors, kinematics and dynamics of particles and extended bodies, forces in equilibrium, linear and rotational motion, conservation of energy and linear momentum. Gravitation. Relativity.

Note: Mathematics 31 is recommended as a prerequisite.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHY 131 (Basic Physics I) or PHY 111 (Introduction to University Physics I) or PHY 121 (Introductory General Physics I)

Prerequisites: ((Math 30-1, Pure Math 30 or equivalent) or (Math 30-2 or equivalent) ) and (Physics 30 or equivalent)

Corequisites: MAT 113 or MAT 114 (Elementary Calculus I)

Further information: Course availability and times

PHY 132 - Basic Physics II - 3 (3-1s-3)
Faculty of Science

A calculus-based course in Physics. Oscillations, waves, sound, light. Geometrical optics, optical instruments. Physical optics, interference, diffraction. Basic thermal physics.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHY 132 (Basic Physics II) or PHY 112 (Introduction to University Physics II) or PHY 122 (Introductory General Physics II)

Prerequisites: (MAT 113 or MAT 114 (Elementary Calculus I)) and (PHY 121 (Introductory General Physics I) or PHY 131 (Basic Physics I))

Corequisites: MAT 115 (Elementary Calculus II)

Further information: Course availability and times

PHY 175 - Physics of Music - 3 (3-1s-0)
Faculty of Science

Oscillations, waves, resonance. Musical sound, musical scales, pure and complex tones, Fourier analysis. Traditional and modern musical instruments. Basics of acoustics. Sound recording and reproduction. Hands-on laboratory experience.

Note: Some music literacy recommended as a prerequisite. This course is not accepted towards a Physics minor.

Further information: Course availability and times

PHY 204 - Introductory General Physics III - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

Electricity and Magnetism. Electrostatics, electric field, potential. Capacitors, electric current, electric circuits. Electromagnetic induction, Faraday's Law, Lenz's law, AC circuits, electromagnetic waves.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHY 204 (Introductory General Physics III) or PHY 281 (Electricity and Magnetism)

Prerequisites: (MAT 113 or MAT 114 (Elementary Calculus I)) and (PHY 112 (Introduction to University Physics II) or PHY 122 (Introductory General Physics II) or PHY 132 (Basic Physics II)) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHY 211 - Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Science

Temperature: heat, work, and the first law of thermodynamics; entropy and the second law, enthalpy, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energy; thermodynamic equilibrium criteria; Maxwell's relations, phase transitions; elementary kinetic theory of gases.

Prerequisites: PHY 122 (Introductory General Physics II) or PHY 132 (Basic Physics II) and 2nd year standing required

Corequisites: MAT 215 (Intermediate Calculus II)

Further information: Course availability and times

PHY 281 - Electricity and Magnetism - 3 (3-0-1.5)
Faculty of Science

Calculus-based version of PHY 204. Electric fields, Gauss' law, electric potential. Capacitance, dielectrics. Electric current, resistance, DC circuits. Electromagnetic induction, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, Lenz's law, AC circuits. Maxwell's equations. Electromagnetic waves.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHY 281 (Electricity and Magnetism) or PHY 204 (Introductory General Physics III)

Prerequisites: MAT 115 (Elementary Calculus II) and PHY 132 (Basic Physics II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHY 301 - Quantum Mechanics - 3 (3-1s-0)
Faculty of Science

Introductory quantum mechanics with emphasis on applications. Fundamentals of quantum mechanics, potential wall, hydrogen atom, many-electron atoms, Hartree-Fock approximation, diatomic molecules, neutral molecules. Introduction to spectroscopy and computational methods.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHY 301 (Quantum Mechanics) or CH 382 (Quantum Chemistry) or CH 492

Prerequisites: MAT 115 (Elementary Calculus II) and (PHY 111 (Introduction to University Physics I) or PHY 121 (Introductory General Physics I) or PHY 131 (Basic Physics I)) and (PHY 122 (Introductory General Physics II) or PHY 132 (Basic Physics II)) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PHY 302 - Chapters of Modern Physics - 3 (3-1s-0)
Faculty of Science

Relativity, solid-state physics, nuclear structure and radioactivity, particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

Prerequisites: PHY 122 (Introductory General Physics II) or PHY 132 (Basic Physics II) and 2nd year standing required

Corequisites: MAT 215 (Intermediate Calculus II)

Further information: Course availability and times

Political Economy

POEC400 - Special Topics in Canadian Public Policy - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

An interdisciplinary capstone course for the Political Economy concentration dealing with the economic and institutional context of policy-making in Canada through an analysis of a series of policy case studies.

Note: Open only to third-year Political Economy concentrations.

Prerequisites: ECO 101 (Introduction to Microeconomics) and ECO 102 (Introduction to Macroeconomics) and ECO 281 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory I) and ECO 282 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory I) and PSCI101 (Introduction to Government) and PSCI102 (Introduction to Politics) and (PSCI220 or PSCI224 (Canadian National Government)) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Political Science

PSCI101 - Introduction to Government - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to the ideas and institutions of Canadian, British, and American governments, considering ideologies, constitutions, legislatures, executives, the public service, courts, federal and other divisions of government authority, and other selected topics.

Further information: Course availability and times

PSCI102 - Introduction to Politics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to the processes of democratic politics, including public opinion, elections, political parties, political participation, voting behaviour and interest groups, and other selected topics.

Further information: Course availability and times

PSCI224 - Canadian National Government - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course deals with key governmental institutions that make up the Canadian state, including the Constitution, federalism, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the courts. It discusses the role of the executive and Parliament and analyzes key law and policy-making processes.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSCI224 (Canadian National Government) or PSCI220

Prerequisites: PSCI101 (Introduction to Government) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSCI225 - Canadian Politics: People and Society - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course examines the Canadian political system and the various societal influences on the state, including region, class, gender and identity. It explores the way groups have influence through processes and organizations such as parties, elections, the media, interest groups and social movement.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSCI225 (Canadian Politics: People and Society) or PSCI220

Prerequisites: PSCI101 (Introduction to Government) or PSCI102 (Introduction to Politics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSCI259 - International Relations I: The International System and Global Conflict - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and theories of international relations. It analyzes the interaction of states focusing on the origins of conflict and war and the conditions for peace and cooperation. It also examines the role of non-state actors including international organizations like the United Nations in preventing and dealing with international conflict and emerging challenges such as transitional terrorism.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSCI259 (International Relations I: The International System and Global Conflict) or PSCI260

Prerequisites: PSCI101 (Introduction to Government) or PSCI102 (Introduction to Politics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSCI261 - International Relations II: Global Governance and the International Political Economy - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and theories of international relations, examining the origins and impact of international economic inequality. It focuses on the development of systems of governance, international political economy including the role of actors such as states, international organizations, multinational enterprises and other non-governmental organizations and social movements in addressing issues such as globalization, poverty, the protection of human rights and sustainable development.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSCI261 (International Relations II: Global Governance and the International Political Economy) or PSCI260

Prerequisites: PSCI101 (Introduction to Government) or PSCI102 (Introduction to Politics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSCI270 - Political Philosophy - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course is intended to provide students with a thorough historical survey of political theories which fundamentally inform the Western tradition. The core concepts of political philosophy will be examined through a close reading of primary texts. Students will be provided with a firm grounding in political theory through study and critical discussion of these philosophical classics. Studied texts will include Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Politics, Machiavelli's Prince, Marx's Manifesto, and Rawls' Theory of Justice.

Note: 3 credits of Philosophy or Political Science is recommended as a prerequisite.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSCI270 (Political Philosophy) or PHIL270 (Political Philosophy) or PHIL470 (The Philosopher's Craft: Political Philosophy)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSCI276 - Problems of Political Development - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The examination of the common problems of developing nations, particularly the problems of achieving economic development and the establishment of democratic political systems. The course focuses on both theories of political development and the actual experiences of a group of Asian, African, and Latin American countries.

Prerequisites: PSCI101 (Introduction to Government) and PSCI102 (Introduction to Politics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSCI280 - Comparative Politics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to the study of comparative politics in the postwar period of selected advanced, industrial countries, including Britain, France, Germany, Japan and Russia. The course also examines the origins and development of the European Union.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSCI280 (Comparative Politics) or PSCI380

Prerequisites: PSCI101 (Introduction to Government) and PSCI102 (Introduction to Politics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSCI361 - Ethical Issues in the Global Political Economy - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduces senior students from a number of disciplines to ethical issues and principles arising from the globalization of the international economic system, especially the intensification of the movement of goods, services and capital in the global political economy. Students will discuss issues such as labour standards (including child labour), poverty, debt, social justice, environmental degradation, bribery and corruption, corporate codes of conduct, human rights, and intellectual property (including biodiversity, gene patenting and access to vital medicines). Each of these issues is addressed from the perspectives of four sets of key actors in the global political economy: multinational corporations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), national governments, and international governmental organizations.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSCI365 - Canadian Foreign Policy - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A senior-level seminar that examines contemporary issues in Canadian foreign policy and analyzes the societal setting of foreign policy, the governmental decision-making process, the role of ideas and the impact of globalization on policy-making. This is done through a review of the major literature in the field and detailed discussion of several major case studies including: national defence and security, UN peacekeeping, human security, trade and investment, development assistance and regional, bilateral and multilateral relations.

Note: Open only to students in the Political Economy concentration or the Political Science minor.

Prerequisites: PSCI220 or PSCI224 (Canadian National Government) or PSCI225 (Canadian Politics: People and Society) or PSCI259 (International Relations I: The International System and Global Conflict) or PSCI260 or PSCI261 (International Relations II: Global Governance and the International Political Economy) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Psychology (Graduate Studies)

PSY 605 - Ethical and Professional Issues in Psychological Practice - 3 (0-0-3)
Faculty of Arts

Students will develop an in-depth understanding of ethical issues and professional standards in counselling and clinical psychology. Students will learn how to identify and resolve ethical issues relevant to the practice of counselling and clinical psychology, following the Canadian Code of Ethics for Psychologists of the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA) and the College of Alberta Psychologists' (CAP) Guidelines and Standards in the professional practice of psychology.

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 611 - Quantitative Data Analysis - 3 (3-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course covers statistical methods used to summarize and make inferences from quantitative data. Inferential statistics include: chi-square, t-test, ANOVA, ANCOVA, correlation, regression and multiple regression.

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 621 - Qualitative Research Methods and Critical Analysis - 3 (0-0-3)
Faculty of Arts

This course will introduce students to the rationale for using qualitative research methods in psychology and related disciplines. Clear guidance will be provided on how to carry out basic qualitative research in psychology, including projects employing grounded theory, interpretative phenomenology, case studies, discourse analysis, and participatory action research. Ambitious students in this course will obtain the background and opportunity to produce an article using one or several qualitative research methods. This article could be suitable for publication. The methods lend themselves to counselling, clinical, and educational inquiries in field settings.

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 622 - Qualitative Research in Applied Settings - 3 (0-1.5s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This is an independent study course that will allow the students to gain experience in conducting supervised research in clinical, counseling, or applied settings in the community. This is an advanced course that follows completion of PSY 621 or PSY 421 in which students will have completed a survey of qualitative research and submitted a research proposal for REB approval. Students will meet individually with their supervisors, collectively with their lab group classmates, and work on their own projects, for a minimum of 3 hours per week, on an ongoing basis while completing their research projects in applied settings.

Prerequisites: PSY 421 (Qualitative Research Methods and Critical Analysis) or PSY 621 (Qualitative Research Methods and Critical Analysis)

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 631 - Theory and Practice of Psychometrics - 3 (0-1.5s-1.5)
Faculty of Arts

A critical appraisal of assessment techniques used for clinical counselling and classification purposes. Topics include reliability, validity, and utility of testing.

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 633 - Group Counselling - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the theory and practice of group counselling, and to provide hands-on experience in the group process. It stimulates thought about ethical and practical issues that are typically encountered by group leaders and participants. Students will have the opportunity to apply their theoretical learning in the context of an experiential teaching group.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSY 633 (Group Counselling) or PSY 630

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 634 - Advanced Intellectual Assessment - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course will provide advanced theoretical knowledge in the area of intellectual assessment, covering the historical development, major theories of intelligence and intellectual assessment including the administration, scoring, interpretation and report writing for both child and adult intellectual batteries. The course will be a combination of class lectures, demonstrations of testing and scoring procedures, in-class observation of students administering intellectual tests to each other, case study presentations, after-class participation in test administration and scoring exercises. The course will provide foundational knowledge for the subsequent practicum placement in intellectual assessment (PSY 635).

Prerequisites: PSY 431 (Theory and Practice of Psychometrics) or PSY 631 (Theory and Practice of Psychometrics)

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 635 - Advanced Intellectual Assessment Practicum - 3 (4-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course will consist of a practicum placement with a Registered Psychologist, under whose field supervision the student will practice the administration of intellectual test batteries in an applied setting and be responsible for developing interpretation and report writing skills. This practicum provides an excellent foundation in intellectual assessment. Further training and supervision would be necessary for the student to be able to conduct independent intellectual assessment as a registered psychologist.

Note: Enrolment may be limited by availability of approved practicum placement sites.

Prerequisites: PSY 434 (Intellectual Assessment) or PSY 634 (Advanced Intellectual Assessment) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 636 - Advanced Personality Assessment - 3 (1.5-0-1.5)
Faculty of Arts

This course will provide advanced theoretical knowledge and techniques in the area of personality assessment. It will involve a combination of lectures, administration and scoring procedures for various personality inventories. It will provide foundational knowledge for the subsequent practicum placement in personality assessment (PSY 637).

Prerequisites: PSY 431 (Theory and Practice of Psychometrics) or PSY 631 (Theory and Practice of Psychometrics)

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 637 - Advanced Personality Assessment Practicum - 3 (4-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The purpose of this course is to build upon knowledge gained in either PSY 433 or PSY 636 or equivalent course. Student will be placed in a practicum where they will be supervised by a Registered Psychologist while completing personality assessments. This practicum provides an excellent foundation in personality assessment. Further training and supervision would be necessary for the student to be able to conduct independent personality assessment as a registered psychologist.

Note: Enrolment may be limited by availability of approved practicum placement sites.

Prerequisites: PSY 433 (Personality Assessment) or PSY 636 (Advanced Personality Assessment) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 652 - Advanced Forensic Assessment - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course will provide advanced theoretical knowledge in the area of forensic psychological assessment, covering the major theories of criminal behavior including administering, scoring, interpreting, and report writing. Students will learn about specialized risk assessment instruments and how assessment results can inform and direct intervention. The course will be a combination of class lectures, demonstrations of testing and scoring procedures of various risk assessment instruments, and interpretation and report writing discussions and exercises. This course will provide foundational knowledge for the subsequent practicum placement in forensic psychological assessment (PSY 653).

Prerequisites: PSY 431 (Theory and Practice of Psychometrics) or PSY 631 (Theory and Practice of Psychometrics)

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 653 - Advanced Forensic Assessment Practicum - 3 (4-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The purpose of this course is to build upon knowledge gained in either PSY 452 or PSY 652. Students will be placed in a practicum where they will be supervised by a Registered Psychologist while completing forensic assessments. This practicum provides an excellent foundation in forensic assessment. Further training and supervision would be necessary for the student to be able to conduct independent forensic assessment as a registered psychologist.

Note: Enrolment may be limited by availability of approved practicum placement sites.

Prerequisites: PSY 452 (Forensic Psychological Assessment) or PSY 652 (Advanced Forensic Assessment) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 659 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology, Diagnosis and Complex Case Conceptualization - 3 (1.5-1.5s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course will offer a comprehensive overview of child and adolescent emotional and behavioral disturbances. Topics will include: models of psychopathology, discussion of disorders affecting children and adolescents, comorbid diagnoses, and complex case conceptualization.

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 669 - Adult Psychopathology, Diagnosis and Complex Case Conceptualization - 3 (1.5-1.5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course will focus on the more commonly occurring mental disorders among adults. Emphasis will be on DSM-V diagnosis supplemented by alternative models of psychopathology. Students will have an opportunity to present and discuss atypical and complex clinical cases.

Note: This course also requires 1.5 hours per week of online work.

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 677 - Advanced Human Neuropsychology - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students will develop an in-depth understanding of the basics of neuroanatomy and neuropathology critical for understanding the mechanisms and consequences of brain injury and neurological diseases. In addition, they will become familiar with the strengths and weaknesses of the two most commonly used neuropsychological batteries.

Prerequisites: PSY 275 (Brain and Behaviour)

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 678 - Advanced Human Neuropsychology Practicum - 3 (8-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students will become familiar with the strengths and weaknesses of the two most commonly used neuropsychological batteries and have the opportunity to work under the direct supervision of a neuropsychologist in learning to administer, score, interpret and write clinical consultation reports for neuropsychological evaluations. This practicum provides an excellent foundation in neuropsychological assessment. Further training and supervision would be necessary for the student to be able to conduct independent neuropsychological assessment as a registered psychologist.

Note: Enrolment may be limited by availability of approved practicum placement sites.

Prerequisites: PSY 635 (Advanced Intellectual Assessment Practicum) and (PSY 477 (Human Neuropsychology) or PSY 677 (Advanced Human Neuropsychology)) and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

Psychology

PSY 104 - Basic Psychological Processes - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introductory study of human behaviour that covers physiology, sensation, perception, learning, memory, cognition, motivation, states of consciousness, and methodology.

Note: A prerequisite for all other courses in the Department, normally followed by PSY 105.

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 105 - Individual and Social Behaviour - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introductory study of human behaviour that covers development, intelligence, personality, abnormal personality, psychotherapy, social psychology, and methodology.

Note: A prerequisite for many courses in the Department.

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes)

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 208 - General Experimental Psychology - 3 (3-0-3)
Faculty of Arts

The application of experimental methods to a wide variety of psychological problems.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and PSY 105 (Individual and Social Behaviour) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 211 - Statistical Methods for Psychological Research - 3 (3-0-1)
Faculty of Arts

An introductory course in basic statistical methods as used in the Social Sciences. Includes descriptive, inferential, and correlational/predictive techniques.

Note: Pure Mathematics 30 or Mathematics 30 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSY 211 (Statistical Methods for Psychological Research) or BUS 112 (Business Statistics) or MAT 151 (Introduction to Statistical Methods) or SOC 210 (Introduction to Social Statistics)

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 223 - Developmental Psychology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The study of human behaviour as it develops throughout the life-span. Includes physiological, cognitive, and social aspects of psychological development with an emphasis on infancy, childhood, and adolescence.

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and PSY 105 (Individual and Social Behaviour) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 275 - Brain and Behaviour - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to brain mechanisms involved in sensation, perception, movement, motivation, learning, and cognition, as studied in both humans and lower animals.

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 281 - Principles of Behaviour Change - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course focuses on the basic principles of habituation, modelling, classical, and operant conditioning.

Note: The course may be offered in a hybrid format (i.e., in-class and online lectures).

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 305 - Ethical Issues in Professional Psychology - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students wiill develop an in-depth understanding of ethical issues and professional standards in counselling and clinical psychology. They will identify and resolve ethical issues following the Canadian Code of Ethics for Psychologists of the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA) and the College of Alberta Psychologists' (CAP) Guidelines and Standards in the professional practice of psychology.

Note: Open only to students in the third year of the four-year Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (Applied Emphasis) program.

Prerequisites: PSY 339 (Abnormal Psychology) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 311 - Intermediate Statistics - 3 (3-1L-0)
Faculty of Arts

An intermediate course in statistical methods used in the social sciences with a focus on multivariate experimental and correlational techniques and the use of statistical software.

Note: The Psychology Department strongly recommends students take PSY 211 as the prerequisite for this course.

Prerequisites: MAT 151 (Introduction to Statistical Methods) [C- minimum grade required] or PSY 211 (Statistical Methods for Psychological Research) [C- minimum grade required] or SOC 210 (Introduction to Social Statistics) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 319 - Research Designs and Intermediate Statistical Methods in Psychology - 3 (3-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Issues of importance to researchers in the social sciences are covered, including ethics, measurement, sampling, and validity of experimental and non-experimental designs. Communication skills (both written and oral) will be emphasized.

Note: The Psychology Department strongly recommends students take PSY 211 as the prerequisite for this course.

Prerequisites: MAT 151 (Introduction to Statistical Methods) [C- minimum grade required] or PSY 211 (Statistical Methods for Psychological Research) [C- minimum grade required] or SOC 210 (Introduction to Social Statistics) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 324 - Adult Development and Human Aging - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the varied issues in adult development and aging. Topics include coping and adjustments across the life-span, intimate relationships and lifestyles, cognitive changes in normal and pathological aging, social and health factors, death and dying.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSY 324 (Adult Development and Human Aging) or PSY 224 or PSY 459

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and PSY 105 (Individual and Social Behaviour) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 332 - Communication and Counselling Skills - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Communication and counselling skills are presented. Opportunities for students to practise skills are a key component of the course. Acquisition of skills should allow students to improve communication in their relationships and enable them to facilitate client development.

Note: Open only to students in the third year of the four-year Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (Applied Emphasis) program.

Prerequisites: PSY 339 (Abnormal Psychology) and 3rd year standing required

Corequisites: PSY 486 (Field Placement I)

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 333 - Introduction to Group Counselling - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course allows students to gain practical experience in the various theoretical approaches to group work. It stimulates thought about ethical and practical issues that are typically encountered by group leaders and participants. Students become familiar with major areas of group work such as task and work groups, guidance and psychoeducational groups, counselling and interpersonal groups, and psychotherapy and personality-reconstruction groups. An applied component of the course allows students the opportunity to engage in experiential exercises related to group processes and practices.

Note: Open only to students in the four-year Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (Applied Emphasis) program.

Prerequisites: (PSY 233 or PSY 338 (Personality)) and PSY 332 (Communication and Counselling Skills) and PSY 339 (Abnormal Psychology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 334 - Personality Disorders in Modern Life - 3 (1.5-1.5s-0)
Faculty of Arts

An examination of the theoretical and empirical perspectives of personality disorders. These perspectives will be considered in the context of modern movies.

Note: The course may be offered in an hybrid format (i.e., in-class and online lectures).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSY 334 (Personality Disorders in Modern Life) or PSY 234

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and PSY 105 (Individual and Social Behaviour) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 337 - Individual Differences - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the biological and social conditions contributing to variations among individuals. The course also deals with methods for describing individuality.

Note: This course is not currently being offered.

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and PSY 105 (Individual and Social Behaviour) and PSY 211 (Statistical Methods for Psychological Research) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 338 - Personality - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students will develop an understanding of representative theoretical points of view and research relevant to the major topics of study of personality.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSY 338 (Personality) or PSY 233

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and PSY 105 (Individual and Social Behaviour) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 339 - Abnormal Psychology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The study of psychopathological disorders and their treatment. Topics covered include the major disorders as described in the DSM-IV. Psychotherapeutic techniques include psychodynamic, humanistic, and behavioural treatments. Other techniques may be included.

Prerequisites: (PSY 233 or PSY 338 (Personality)) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 341 - Social Psychology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The study of the influence of others on individual behaviour, including topics such as socialization, attitude formation and change, person perception, and group processes.

Note: The course may be offered in a hybrid format (i.e., in-class and online lectures).

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSY 341 (Social Psychology) or PSY 241 or SOC 241 (Social Psychology)

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and PSY 105 (Individual and Social Behaviour) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 350 - Corrections and Forensics: Criminal Behaviour - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The goals for this course are to understand the criminal justice system, corrections, and criminal behaviour. Some aspects of normal and abnormal human development are discussed. Aspects of psychological assessment and treatment of criminal offenders are reviewed.

Note: This course may be limited to students in the four-year Bachelor of Arts in Psychology programs.

Prerequisites: (PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and PSY 105 (Individual and Social Behaviour)) or SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 351 - Human Sexual Behaviour - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A study of the psychology of human sexual behaviour. Topics examined include the physiology of human sexual response, social structures relating to sexuality and sex roles, and the individual emotional aspects of human sexual intimacy. Sexual disorders, sexual aggression, and sexually transmitted diseases are discussed, as are psychological and ethical aspects of attraction, intimacy, and communication.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSY 351 (Human Sexual Behaviour) or PSY 250

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and PSY 105 (Individual and Social Behaviour) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 358 - Cognition - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students will develop an understanding of mental processes in memory, attention, and cognition. Central empirical findings, experimental methodology, and theoretical importance will be discussed.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSY 358 (Cognition) or PSY 258

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 359 - Atypical Development - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to theory and research on childhood exceptionality, including cognitive, learning, neurological, and behavioral exceptionality.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSY 359 (Atypical Development) or EDPS341 (Psychology of Exceptional Children and Youth)

Prerequisites: PSY 223 (Developmental Psychology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 367 - Sensation and Perception - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The psychological and physiological bases of sensory and perceptual processes, including vision, audition, taste, smell, touch, proprioception, and basic psychophysics.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSY 367 (Sensation and Perception) or PSY 267

Prerequisites: ((Biology 30 or equivalent) or BIO 100 (Introduction to Biological Systems)) and PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 385 - Applications of Learning - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An examination of the ways in which principles of learning and cognition are applied to the human change process. Assessment, diagnosis, and the application of cognitive-behavioural principles are examined. Biomedical applications of therapy are also covered.

Note: This course may be offered in a hybrid format (i.e., in-class and online lectures). This course is intended to follow PSY 281.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSY 385 (Applications of Learning) or PSY 381

Prerequisites: PSY 281 (Principles of Behaviour Change) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 399 - Psychology of Women - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Explores a wide variety of issues that concern women. A lifespan development approach is used as a framework to study issues of relevance to women and their psychological development.

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and PSY 105 (Individual and Social Behaviour) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 405 - Special Topics in Psychology - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A seminar course in the history and systems of psychology. Focuses on the major schools of thought instrumental in shaping the discipline of psychology.

Note: Open only to Psychology students in the final year of the three-year Psychology concentration and students in the third- or fourth year of the four-year Bachelor of Arts in Psychology program.

Prerequisites: PSY 319 (Research Designs and Intermediate Statistical Methods in Psychology) and 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 420 - Psychology of Religion - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course will seek to provide students with an introduction to the major issues, theories, and research approaches to the psychology of religion. Other issues discussed include the roles that religion can play on the beliefs, motivations, emotions, and behaviours of individuals and groups.

Prerequisites: PSY 104 (Basic Psychological Processes) and PSY 105 (Individual and Social Behaviour) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 421 - Qualitative Research Methods and Critical Analysis - 3 (0-1.5s-1.5)
Faculty of Arts

This course will introduce students to the rationale for using qualitative research methods in psychology and related disciplines. Clear guidance will be provided on how to carry out basic qualitative research in psychology, including projects employing grounded theory, interpretative phenomenology, case studies, discourse analysis, and participatory action research. Central issues to be addressed in the course include: a) major debates and unresolved issues surrounding this form of research; b) when to use qualitative methods as opposed to quantitative methods; c) how to conduct qualitative research; d) cutting edge theory; e) evolving methodologies; and f) in-depth examination of applied work based on qualitative methods. Ambitious students in this course will obtain the background and opportunity to produce an article using one or several qualitative research methods. This article could be suitable for publication. The methods lend themselves to counselling, clinical, and educational inquiries in field settings.

Prerequisites: PSY 319 (Research Designs and Intermediate Statistical Methods in Psychology) or SOC 315 (Introduction to Social Methodology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 422 - Qualitative Research in Applied Settings - 3 (0-1.5s-0)
Faculty of Arts

This is an independent study course that will allow the students to gain experience in conducting supervised research in clinical, counseling, or applied settings in the community. This is an advanced course that follows completion of PSY 421 in which students will have completed a survey of qualitative research and submitted a research proposal for REB approval. Students will meet individually with their supervisors, collectively with their lab group classmates, and work on their own projects, for a minimum of 3 hours per week on an ongoing basis while completing their research projects in applied settings.

Prerequisites: PSY 421 (Qualitative Research Methods and Critical Analysis) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 431 - Theory and Practice of Psychometrics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A critical appraisal of assessment techniques used for clinical counselling and classification purposes. Topics include reliability, validity, and utility of testing. Students will have the opportunity to practice selected psychometric techniques.

Note: Enrolment may be limited to students in the four-year Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (Applied Emphasis) program. This course may be offered in a hybrid format (i.e., online and in-class lectures).

Prerequisites: MAT 151 (Introduction to Statistical Methods) [C- minimum grade required] or PSY 211 (Statistical Methods for Psychological Research) [C- minimum grade required] or SOC 210 (Introduction to Social Statistics) [C- minimum grade required] and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 433 - Personality Assessment - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

A broad survey of the major methods, techniques, issues, and problems of personality assessment. Students will have the opportunity to administer and score various personality inventories.

Note: Open only to students in the four-year Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (Applied Emphasis) program. This course may be offered in a hybrid format (i.e., online and in-class lectures).

Prerequisites: PSY 339 (Abnormal Psychology) and PSY 431 (Theory and Practice of Psychometrics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 434 - Intellectual Assessment - 3 (0-3L-0)
Faculty of Arts

A broad survey of the major methods and issues of intellectual assessment. Students will have an opportunity to administer and score various intellectual assessment instruments.

Note: Open only to students in the four-year Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (Applied Emphasis) program.

Prerequisites: PSY 339 (Abnormal Psychology) and PSY 431 (Theory and Practice of Psychometrics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 435 - Clinical and Counselling Psychology: Theories and Applications - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The theories and applications of clinical and counselling psychology with a particular focus on counselling/psychotherapy. The history and development of the professional roles of clinical and counselling psychologists, fields of specialization, assessment and diagnosis, and integration of methods of intervention are covered. Research and evidence-based practice in clinical and counselling psychology are reinforced.

Prerequisites: PSY 339 (Abnormal Psychology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 452 - Forensic Psychological Assessment - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course will teach students about present practices in forensic psychological assessment and treatment, including how to read a warrant and the Criminal Code of Canada, prepare hospital file summaries, administer a complete fitness for trial evaluation, as well as teach the basics of risk and criminal responsibility assessment. Students will learn how to administer specialized malingering and personality tests. Treatment of individuals found not responsible by reason of mental disorder for criminal acts will be discussed. Field trips to mental health and/or legal facilities will be involved.

Note: Open only to students in the four-year Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (Applied Emphasis) program.

Prerequisites: PSY 350 (Corrections and Forensics: Criminal Behaviour) and 4th year standing required

Corequisites: PSY 433 (Personality Assessment)

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 477 - Human Neuropsychology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The relation between brain function and human behaviour and the application of neuropsychology in applied and clinical settings.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PSY 477 (Human Neuropsychology) or PSY 377

Prerequisites: PSY 275 (Brain and Behaviour) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 480 - Independent Research in Psychology I - 3 (0-0-3)
Faculty of Arts

An independent study course that will provide the opportunity for the selected student to gain experience in advanced research on a topic in the area of expertise of one of the faculty in Psychology. In consultation with the professor the student will identify a research topic, submit a literature review, bibliography, and research proposal. Emphasis will be placed on developing scientific thinking and oral and written communication to an academic audience.

Note: Open only to students in the four-year Bachelor of Arts in Psychology or Psychology (Applied Emphasis) programs. Registration is limited and requires written permission by the Psychology Department. A student must first secure approval from a supervising professor and the department chair before being permitted to register in this course.

Prerequisites: PSY 311 (Intermediate Statistics) [B+ minimum grade required] and PSY 319 (Research Designs and Intermediate Statistical Methods in Psychology) [B+ minimum grade required] and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 481 - Independent Research in Psychology II - 3 (0-0-3)
Faculty of Arts

A continuation of PSY 480. This is an independent study course that will provide the opportunity for the selected student to gain experience in advanced research on a topic in the area of expertise of one of the faculty in Psychology. In consultation with the professor the student will complete a research project and present results in an academic forum in the form of a poster, workshop, or presentation. Emphasis will be placed on research design, methodology, data analysis, and data presentation skills.

Prerequisites: PSY 311 (Intermediate Statistics) [B+ minimum grade required] and PSY 319 (Research Designs and Intermediate Statistical Methods in Psychology) [B+ minimum grade required] and PSY 480 (Independent Research in Psychology I) [B+ minimum grade required] and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

PSY 486 - Field Placement I - 6 (0-1s-6)
Faculty of Arts

An off-campus field placement where students work under the supervision of a cooperating agency professional to gain experience in the field. Field placements include hospitals, educational and forensic institutions, private practices, and other agencies. In addition to the Field Supervisor, each student is assigned to a Faculty Advisor and a Field Placement Coordinator who acts as a liaison between the student and the outside agency. Seminars are held to complement placement experiences.

Criteria for progression to the second semester of PSY 486 include: (a) logging a minimum of 65 hours in the field placement by the last day of classes in December, as confirmed by the Field Placement Supervisor, (b) receiving a satisfactory field placement evaluation as assessed by the Psychology Department at the end of the first semester, and (c) achieving a minimum grade of B in PSY 305 and 332.

Note: Open only to students with at least third-year status in the four-year Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (Applied Emphasis) program.

Prerequisites: PSY 339 (Abnormal Psychology) and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department and special conditions as specified below

Corequisites: PSY 305 (Ethical Issues in Professional Psychology) and PSY 332 (Communication and Counselling Skills)

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: A current security clearance

PSY 496 - Field Placement II - 6 (0-1s-6)
Faculty of Arts

An off-campus field placement where students work under the supervision of a cooperating agency professional to gain experience in the field. Field placements include hospitals, educational and forensic institutions, private practices, and other agencies. In addition to the Field Supervisor, each student is assigned to a Faculty Advisor and a Field Placement Coordinator who acts as a liaison between the student and the outside agency. Seminars are held to complement placement experiences.

Criteria for progression to the second semester of PSY 496 include: (a) logging a minimum of 65 hours in the field placement by the last day of classes in December, as confirmed by the Field Placement Supervisor, (b) receiving a satisfactory field placement evaluation as assessed by the Psychology Department at the end of the first semester.

Note: Open only to students with fourth-year standing in the four-year Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (Applied Emphasis: Enhanced Stream) program.

Prerequisites: PSY 486 (Field Placement I) and 4th year standing required and Consent of Department and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: A current security clearance

Public Health Leadership

PHLD 600 - Management Principles for Public Health Professionals - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Public Health

Students will develop an in-depth understanding of the theory and practice of management skills required as Public Health Professionals and other public health practitioners. Topics covered include the core key functions of management, planning, organizing, leading and controlling, social responsibility, and managing change.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHLD 600 (Management Principles for Public Health Professionals) or ENVH600

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent.

PHLD 602 - Project Planning for Public Health Professionals - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Public Health

Students will develop an in-depth understanding of working successfully in a project environment. Topics covered will include communications; resource considerations, cost planning, performance (evaluation); and completing the project.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent.

PHLD 605 - Ethical Decision Making in Public Health - 1.5 (0-1.5s-0)
Public Health

Students will apply knowledge and personally integrate the challenges of ethical leadership by extending the learning into their work place. Through self-exploration of personal ethics and a self-directed interview-based study, students will develop a professional integrated case study in ethical reasoning.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHLD 605 (Ethical Decision Making in Public Health) or ENVH605

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent.

PHLD 610 - Leadership Principles for Public Health Profesionals - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Public Health

Students will apply the foundational framework of knowledge and critical thinking skills needed for effective leadership of public health organizations. Topics covered include theories, values, issues and skills of leadership, tools for effective motivation, and the relationship of communication to organizational effectiveness.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHLD 610 (Leadership Principles for Public Health Profesionals) or ENVH610

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent.

PHLD 612 - Resource Management for Public Health Professionals - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Public Health

Students will examine the role of human resource management in a public health setting. The strategic importance of effective human resources management in a knowledge-based learning organization is becoming increasingly important. Topics covered will include staffing for organizational effectiveness, work design, training and development, labour relations, health and safety, performance management, and legal issues.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent

PHLD 615 - Ethical Leadership and Critical Choice - 1.5 (0-1.5s-0)
Public Health

Through an intensive, interpersonal format, students will develop knowledge and enhance thought on reconciling personal values with professional responsibilities in public health, on ethical reasoning in the moment, modelling a high moral standard in public health service, and on competent ethical reasoning when facing moral dilemmas in public service.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHLD 615 (Ethical Leadership and Critical Choice) or ENVH615 or ENVH605

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent.

Public Health Strategic Communications

PHSC 620 - Public Health Communications: From Theory to Practice - 1.5 (0-1.5s-0)
Public Health

Students develop an in-depth understanding of current health communication theories as well as the approaches and action areas of public health communication. Contextual issues including cultural, geographic, socioeconomic, ethnic, age, and gender will be addressed. The theories are extended to the planning, implementation, and evaluation of communication strategies.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent.

PHSC 621 - Public Health Communication: Becoming a Knowledge Broker - 1.5 (0-1.5s-0)
Public Health

Knowledge Translation is defined by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) as a dynamic and iterative process that includes the synthesis, dissemination, exchange, and ethically sound application of knowledge to improve health. Students in this course will become familiar with the knowledge-to-action framework. Applying the knowledge-to-action cycle, students will learn the skills of knowledge brokering, bridging the gaps between research, policy, and decision making in Public Health.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent

PHSC 623 - Public Health Advocacy - 1.5 (0-1.5s-0)
Public Health

Public Health Advocacy is defined as the process by which the actions of individuals or groups attempt to bring about social and/or organizational change on behalf of a particular health goal, program, interest, or population.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent

PHSC 624 - Community Engagement in Public Health - 1.5 (0-1.5s-0)
Public Health

Community engagement refers to the process of getting communities involved in decisions that affect them. Collaborative work between the public health professional and the community is essential in promoting health and preventing disease.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent.

PHSC 627 - Strategic Risk Communication in Public Health Practice - 1.5 (0-1.5s-0)
Public Health

Risk communication involves the two-way exchange of information between interested parties in order to make decisions about how to best manage risk. Risk communication can occur in many forms, from providing information to target audiences (primarily one-way) to highly interactive stakeholder engagement and citizen dialogue (two-way).

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent

PHSC 628 - Social and Behavioural Change in Public Health - 1.5 (0-1.5s-0)
Public Health

Theories of health behaviour identify the targets for change and the methods for accomplishing these changes. Theories also inform the evaluation of change efforts by helping to identify the outcomes to be measured, as well as the timing and methods of study to be used.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent.

Public Health for Vulnerable Populations

PHVP 630 - Urban Health and Healthy Public Policy - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Public Health

Where people live affects their health and chances of leading flourishing lives. An ever-growing proportion of the global living populations lives in urban areas. The proportion of Canadians (80%) who live in urban areas has increased steadily since Confederation. Urban areas are often unhealthy places to live, characterized by heavy traffic, pollution, noice, violence and social isolation. People in urban areas experience increased rates of noncommunicable disease and injury, with the poor typically exposed to the worst environments. This course will examine ways to tackle these challenges and improve urban public health.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent

PHVP 631 - Aboriginal Health and Healthy Public Policy - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Public Health

This course will examine the major health problems affecting Aboriginal Canadians today. Students will have the opportunity to critically examine and reflect on the causes of these problems and their solutions embedded within the historical, social, cultural and political realities of Aboriginal peoples today. At the end of the course, students will have acquired a broad, critical understanding of the major challenges confronting Aboriginal people in Canada and the health impacts of these challenges. The course will prepare students to undertake positions in public health that involve the policies and programs for Aboriginal peoples living in urban centres and Aboriginal communities.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent

PHVP 634 - Public Health for Children and Youth at Risk - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Public Health

This course will examine the social, political, and cultural factors that shape the health of socially disadvantaged children from infancy through adolescence in Canada. A life course perspective will be used to examine the role childhood plays in creating and maintaining socioeconomic health inequalities in later adulthood. At the end of this course, students will understand the impacts that latency effects, pathway effects and cumulative effects have on health across the lifespan. Students will be able to describe recent trends in governmental approaches aimed at reducing health disparities among socially vulnerable children and youth in Canada, and compare these approaches internationally. The course will prepare students to undertake positions in public health that involve the planning of policies and programs aimed at reducing health inequalities among socially vulnerable children and youth.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent

PHVP 635 - Public Health and Labour Market Disadvantage - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Public Health

Employment and working conditions are important determinants of health, providing individuals an income as well as a sense of identity, belonging and structure in their day-to-day lives. Canadians who are disadvantaged in the labour market are a vulnerable population. This includes individuals who are frequently unemployed, underemployed, or employed in unhealthy or insecure work environments. This course will use a multilevel perspective to (1) examine the impacts of labour market disadvantage on health; (2) introduce students to pathways that may explain these impacts; and (3) identify actions to reduce labour market disadvantage and its health impacts on Canadians.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent

PHVP 637 - Public Health and Socially Marginalized Populations - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Public Health

This course will examine the public health impacts of social marginalization among key groups in Canada. The degree to which these populations experience income and employment disparities and discrimination as compared to other wealthy developed nations of the OECD will be critically examined. Implications for strengthening public policies in Canada to improve the health and well being of socially maginalized groups in Canada will be discussed and debated.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent

PHVP 638 - Interpersonal Violence and Public Health - 1.5 (0-1s-0)
Public Health

This course considers the causes and public health consequences of interpersonal violence in Canadian society. Upon completion of this course students will be able to (1) identify and describe, in epidemiologic terms, the nature and magnitude of interpersonal violence against women and children in Canada; (2) describe the major biological, psychological, socio-cultural, and political causes of violence; (3) critically evaluate Canada's approach to preventing interpersonal violence against women and children, and assisting victims as compared to international efforts in other developed countries; and (4) identify policies and programs that will fill the gaps in our current efforts.

Prerequisites: special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Undergraduate degree or equivalent

Religious Studies

REL 101 - Western Religious Traditions - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to the study of religion and the major Western traditions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 101 (Western Religious Traditions) or REL 150 (Introduction to the Christian Faith)

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 102 - Eastern Religious Traditions - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to traditions originating in Asia such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shinto.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 102 (Eastern Religious Traditions) or REL 100

Corequisites: REL 101 (Western Religious Traditions) or REL 150 (Introduction to the Christian Faith)

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 150 - Introduction to the Christian Faith - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Christian belief and practice from its Old Testament roots, life and ministry of Jesus Christ, and the proclamation of the early church.

Note: This course cannot be used to fulfill the requirements of a Religious Studies major or concentration.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 150 (Introduction to the Christian Faith) or REL 101 (Western Religious Traditions)

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 248 - The Christian Tradition - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An historical survey of the beliefs and practices of Christianity, from New Testament to modern times.

Note: Open to first-year students.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 248 (The Christian Tradition) or HIS 206 (History of Christianity)

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 252 - Old Testament Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Background, authorship sources, literary qualities and general teaching of the various books of the Old Testament, and the formation of the Old Testament.

Note: Open to first-year students.

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 253 - New Testament Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The life of Jesus, the development of New Testament Christianity in its Jewish and Hellenistic contexts, and the formation of the New Testament.

Note: Open to first-year students.

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 275 - Reasoning: Scientific and Religious - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The purposes of this course are to compare the reasoning and methodology found in science with those found in religion, and to consider whether and how religious considerations could rightly be used in science, and vice versa. The course begins with an analysis of scientific reasoning and methodology, drawing from contemporary philosophy of science. It then examines, for the sake of comparison, examples of religious reasoning drawn from contemporary philosophy of religion and theology.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 275 (Reasoning: Scientific and Religious) or PHIL275 (Reasoning: Scientific and Religious) or PHIL475 (The Philosopher's Craft: Reasoning - Scientific and Religious)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 290 - Faith and Reason - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course analyses various perspectives on the relationship between faith (Christian faith in particular) and reason. It includes examinations of various traditional attempts to use reason as a foundation for, or in support of, faith, attempts to use reason to argue against faith, as well as perspectives according to which all such attempts are ill-conceived. Put otherwise, it examines views according to which faith and reason are in agreement, views according to which they are in conflict with one another, and views according to which neither is the case.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 290 (Faith and Reason) or BCS 590 (Philosophy of Religion) or PHIL290 (Philosophy of Religion) or PHIL490 (The Philosopher's Craft: Philosophy of Religion)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 302 - Greek and Roman Religions - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A comparative study of ancient Greek and Roman religions, examining mythologies, ideologies, and practices with respect to religious, historical, and social factors.

Note: REL 253 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 302 (Greek and Roman Religions) or CLAS357 (Greek and Roman Religions)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 305 - Special Topics in World Religions: Sacred Space and Pilgrimage - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A common feature in many religious traditions involves the identification of a sacred site, and a journey to and from that site. People who make such trips often report being changed: they return with different insights and a new understanding of themselves as individuals and members of a community. The anthropological concept of 'rite of passage' is used as a theoretical foundation for this course. We examine practice and concepts in a variety of world religions. Students will demonstrate their knowledge in reports and examinations.

Note: This course is part of the REL 305-310 Series: Special Topics in World Religions.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 306 - Special Topics in World Religions: Ethics in World Religions - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Examining the ethical teachings and practices of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Daoism and Hinduism. This senior-level class will compare how a specific issue, concept, or practice occurs in selected world religions. The specific religions covered in the course, as well as the topic, will vary depending upon the instructor.

Note: This course is part of the REL 305-310 Series: Special Topics in World Religions.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 311 - Religion and Pop Culture - 3 (1-2s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Interdisciplinary critical analysis of religious ideas and imagery presented in pop culture including the media of television, comedy, sports, consumerism, advertising, film, fashion, literature, comic books, technology, music and internet.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 311 (Religion and Pop Culture) or BCS 511 (Religion and Pop Culture)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 320 - The Pentateuch - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Critical study of the first section of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) -- including literary, historical and archaeological considerations -- as well as the basic content and theology of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 320 (The Pentateuch) or BCS 513 or BCS 520 (Special Topics in the Pentateuch)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 321 - The Historical Literature of the Old Testament - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Critical study of the Historical Literature of the Old Testament in terms of historiography, content, and correlations with archaeology and comparative literature in the Ancient Near East, as well as the content and theology of Joshua, Judges, Ruth, Samuel, Kings, Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 321 (The Historical Literature of the Old Testament) or BCS 521 (The Historical Literature of the Old Testament)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 322 - The Prophetic Literature of the Old Testament - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A critical study of the Prophetic Literature of the Old Testament in terms of form, content and theology in historical-literary context and in relation to its contemporary relevance.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 323 - The Poetic Literature of the Old Testament - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A critical study of the Poetic Literature of the Old Testament in terms of genre, content and theology in the context of the Ancient Near East-including the lyrical poetry of The Psalter and the Wisdom Tradition of Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 331 - Old Testament Theology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Critical study of the major theological concepts and themes of Old Testament literature.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 332 - Intertestamental Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

History and literature of the period between the Old and New Testaments, including Apocrypha, Pseudepigrapha, and Dead Sea Scrolls.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 337 - Ancient Near Eastern Religions - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Survey of ancient Near Eastern religions, including Sumerian, Assyrian, Babylonian, Canaanite, Egyptian, and Hittite religions.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 338 - The Dead Sea Scrolls - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the documents found at Qumran and their value in reconstructing the faith and practice of a religious community within the context of Second Temple Judaism and early Christianity.

Note: REL 252 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 338 (The Dead Sea Scrolls) or BCS 538 (The Dead Sea Scrolls)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 339 - Archaeology, Historiography and the Bible - 3 (2-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Interdisciplinary relationship between archaeology (material remains/artefacts), historiography (the processes of writing history) and biblical texts in both the Old and New Testaments as well as their interface with the documentary media and especially television.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 340 - The Rise of Western Christendom - 3 (2-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Often referred to as the "Dark Ages", the period from c. 400 to c. 1000 was the period in which the Roman world was transformed into its three "heirs" that have defined the history of the West ever since: the Byzantine Empire (Eastern Europe), Western Christendom, and Islamic civilizations. This course will evaluate the transformation of late antiquity and the rise of Western Christendom in the early Middle Ages, focusing especially on the relationship between the Christian church and society.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 340 (The Rise of Western Christendom) or BCS 540 (The Rise of Western Christendom) or HIS 340 (Light on Europe in the "Dark Ages")

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 342 - Christianity in the Second and Third Centuries - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Historical analysis of the concepts and practices of mainstream Christianity prior to Constantine, in its context of alternative Christianities and the larger Roman society.

Note: REL 248 or REL 253 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 342 (Christianity in the Second and Third Centuries) or BCS 545 (The Early Church Fathers)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 351 - The History of Christianity in Canada - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An in-depth study of the history of Christianity in Canada from its earliest beginnings to the present. The course will include an analysis of major trends and themes.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 351 (The History of Christianity in Canada) or BCS 551 (History of Christianity in Canada)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 359 - Theology of Luther - 3 (2-1s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A critical study of Luther, his theology, and impact on the Reformation.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 359 (Theology of Luther) or HIS 309 (Luther and the Reformation)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 362 - Synoptic Gospels - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A comparative and historical analysis of the purpose, characteristics, and problems of the first three Gospels.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 364 - The Gospel of Matthew - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A study of the major themes of Matthew, its relation to the other synoptic Gospels, and its place in modern New Testament criticism.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 364 (The Gospel of Matthew) or BCS 537 or BCS 564 (Topics in the Gospel of Matthew)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 365 - Johannine Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The course examines the Gospel of John, three Johannine letters, and the book of Revelation both against the background of first century Jewish-Hellenistic history and their theological relevance in our time.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 365 (Johannine Literature) or BCS 535 (Johannine Literature)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 367 - Studies in the Pauline Literature - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A study of the Apostle Paul; his background, audience, and key features of his writing.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 367 (Studies in the Pauline Literature) or BCS 534 or BCS 567 (Topics in Pauline Literature)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 369 - Women in the Bible and Early Christianity - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A study of women in the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible), the New Testament, and Early Christianity, exploring the Biblical image of women through an examination of various well-known and "neglected" stories of the Bible and the role of women in the early church.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 370 - The Eastern Church - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A basic introduction to the history, theology, and traditions of Eastern Orthodox Christianity.

Note: REL 248 or REL 342 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 370 (The Eastern Church) or BCS 570 (The Eastern Church)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 373 - Contemporary Issues in Religious Ethics - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Contemporary problems in religious ethics and their impact on collective decision-making in the areas of politics, medicine, law, etc. Professional responsibility in today's world.

Note: Enrolment may be limited to third- and fourth-year students.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 374 - Ethical Theory and Business - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to basic ethical concepts and principles that are relevant to business. A survey of basic ethical perspectives (Religious, Christian and Philosophical) will establish the conceptual foundation that students will then apply in considering examples and cases from the business world. The course will also address the use of ethics in solving moral dilemmas that arise in business interactions.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 374 (Ethical Theory and Business) or MGT 374 (Ethical Theory and Business)

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 375 - Christian Theology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Theology is talking about God. This course explores how the Christian church talks about God and forms its teaching on the basis of the Bible, making clear its understanding through creeds and confessions in order to teach the Christian faith and to deal with theological disputes. Attention is given to significant turning points in the history of Christian theology.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 375 (Christian Theology) or PN 375

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 376 - The Lutheran Confessions - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the history of the formation of the Lutheran Confessions and a study of the central themes found therein.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 376 (The Lutheran Confessions) or BCS 576 (The Lutheran Confessions)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 382 - Christology of the New Testament - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A study of the names and titles of Jesus, their theological content, and their significance in the various writings of the New Testament.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 383 - Jewish-Christian Relations in Antiquity - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course will examine historically and religiously the symbiotic relationship between Jews and Christians from their origins. The course will critically re-examine the current Jewish-Christian scholarship on the issue of the "Parting of the Ways" (i.e. separation between the two parties) by focussing on the complex and intricate relationship between Jews and Christians in antiquity, particularily with a focus on the Roman world.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 383 (Jewish-Christian Relations in Antiquity) or BCS 583 (Jewish-Christian Relations in Antiquity)

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 385 - Orthodoxy and Heresy in Early Christianity - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The primary purpose of the class will be to explore the variety of non-canonical (i.e. apocryphal) texts which were developed and widely read in the first several centuries of the Christian era. Examination of these NT apocryphal writings will show diversity in early Christianity in the form of either Christian "orthodoxy" or "heresy". Heresy historically has been a constant companion of orthodoxy Christianity and functioned like a pumice on Christianity in the sense that the primary faith contents of Christianity were refined as the early Christians struggled with the challenges posed by the heretics to define the Christian rule of faith with clarity and preserve its wholesomeness. To examine this, the course will examine the various strands of Christianity and the key issues of debate among them by looking into diversity in early Christian thought and practice by investigating both "orthodoxical" and "heterodoxical" expressions contained in NT apocryphal writings.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 474 - Business Ethics: Concepts and Cases - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A continuation of the discussion of ethical examples in business and management and draws upon situations and cases emphasizing senior-level ethical concepts and principles. Students will be required to complete a project. Those students who have elected a minor will be encouraged to focus their project in that area.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of REL 474 (Business Ethics: Concepts and Cases) or MGT 474 (Business Ethics: Concepts and Cases)

Prerequisites: MGT 374 (Ethical Theory and Business) or REL 374 (Ethical Theory and Business) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 490 - Independent Study - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

In consultation with members of the Religious Studies Division, students undertake an independent study on an approved topic.

Note: Open only to students with a Religious Studies concentration or major.

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

REL 499 - Topics in Religious Studies - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A seminar on selected topics in religion.

Note: Open only to students with a Religious Studies concentration or major.

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

Religious Studies Applied Emphasis

RELA 201 - World Missions - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A Biblical perspective for world mission, an introduction to the history of Christian missions, cross cultural understanding, political impact upon mission efforts, the challenge to becoome world Christian, and how the evangelistic mission of the local parish relates to "making disciplines of all nations".

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of RELA 201 (World Missions) or REL 201

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

RELA 202 - Theology and History of Evangelism - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Theological, historical, and methodological perspectives of the evangelism ministry of the Church. Addresses the many facets of evangelism and outreach through lectures, class readings, discussions, and student presentations.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of RELA 202 (Theology and History of Evangelism) or REL 202

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

RELA 288 - Family Life Ministry - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A broad understanding of life-span family ministry, its practical implications, and applications through the study of the changing nature of families will be addressed. Theological foundations of family, faith and family, family relations, families in society, family law and public policies, aging and the family will also be addressed.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of RELA 288 (Family Life Ministry) or PS 288

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

RELA 301 - Teaching the Christian Faith - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The principles of Biblical interpretation and the purpose and goals of Christian development. The communication of Law and Gospel and the work of the Holy Spirit; spiritual and moral development; practical implications and applications are also addressed.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of RELA 301 (Teaching the Christian Faith) or PS 301

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Corequisites: REL 375 (Christian Theology) or REL 376 (The Lutheran Confessions)

Further information: Course availability and times

RELA 302 - Parish Administration and Team Ministry - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Principles for effective leadership; styles of leadership, parish organizational structures, and models of team ministry; skills to work with volunteers. Decision-making, problem-solving, and dealing with conflict and conflict resolution.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of RELA 302 (Parish Administration and Team Ministry) or PN 302 or PS 302

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

RELA 303 - History and Practice of Christian Education - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The history of diaconal ministry in Lutheran Church-Canada, the doctrine of the call, the mission of the congregation, and the office of the ministry; Christian denominations; relationships with staff and congregational officers; roles of professional church workers; contemporary issues; professional ethics.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of RELA 303 (History and Practice of Christian Education) or PS 303

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

RELA 304 - Principles of Youth and Young Adult Ministry - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A broad understanding of young people, youth culture, related developmental issues, ministry models, the theology which underlies this ministry as well as practical implications and applications of these principles.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of RELA 304 (Principles of Youth and Young Adult Ministry) or PS 304

Prerequisites: 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

RELA 444 - Counselling Theory in a Christian Context - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An examination of the ways in which the various theories of counselling can be applied to areas of human concern. Although this is a survey course, students are expected to integrate the various psychological theories through the lens of Scripture. Aspects of counselling ethics and assessment are covered in this course.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of RELA 444 (Counselling Theory in a Christian Context) or PS 444

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Youth Ministry Certificate students earning a 3.0 GPA

RELA 445 - Adult Education - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Addresses the unique characteristics of adults as learners from both cognitive and faith formation perspectives and the planning, implementation, and evaluation of adult education programs.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of RELA 445 (Adult Education) or PS 445

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

RELA 450 - Director of Parish Services Practicum - 3 (0-1.5s-5)
Faculty of Arts

The course requires an off-campus placement in a local congregation where students work under the supervision of a pastor or Director of Parish Services to gain experience in the field. Weekly seminars are held to enhance the practicum by processing experiences, discussing such items as skills/attitudes, current research and writing, and monitoring the development and implementation of a major project.

Note: Open only to students in the four-year Religious Studies (Applied Emphasis) degree or the Director of Parish Services Colloquy program. This is a 3-credit course delivered over the full academic year.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of RELA 450 (Director of Parish Services Practicum) or PS 450

Prerequisites: 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: A current security clearance

RELA 490 - Independent Studies - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

In consultation with the Coordinator of Religious Studies (Applied Emphasis) program, the student will undertake an independent study of an approved topic. With departmental approval students may take this course which will augment a student's church work preparation degree program or help meet the certification requirements.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of RELA 490 (Independent Studies) or PS 490

Prerequisites: Religious Studies-Applied Emphasis (6SR) or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Students in the teacher or DRELA colloquy program or Youth Ministry Certificate students earning a 3.0 GPA in their first five courses of study

RELA 501 - Director of Parish Services Internship - 18 (0-0-0)
Parish Services Program

A full-time supervised professional involvement in a congregational setting. Opportunities to transfer theory to life experience, to enhance the skills learned in field work courses, and to apply leadership and team ministry skills in the parish setting. A one-year internship.

Note: Open only to students who have completed the 4-year Religious Studies (Applied Emphasis) degree or the Director of Parish Services Colloquy program. For internships in Lutheran Church-Canada congregations, students must be members in good standing of Lutheran Church-Canada congregations.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of RELA 501 (Director of Parish Services Internship) or PS 501

Prerequisites: RELA 450 and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: A current Security Clearance and Religious Studies (Applied Emphasis) Internship Permission Form Required

RELA 502 - Mission Internship - 3 (0-0-0)
Parish Services Program

A 9-month experience in a Lutheran Church-Canada mission field. Students are assigned to mission fields only if opportunities are available where they can contribute and learn. Possible mission internships may be served in Ukraine, Nicaragua, Thailand, Macau, or in a cross-cultural site in Canada.

Note: Students must be members in good standing of Lutheran Church-Canada congregations, complete the required inoculations, possess valid passports, and successfully complete cross-cultural orientation as provided by Lutheran Church-Canada.
Note: Students who take RELA 502 are also required to complete RELA 501 for a 9-month period either before or after RELA 502.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of RELA 502 (Mission Internship) or PS 502

Prerequisites: RELA 450 and Consent of Department and special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: A current Security Clearance and Religious Studies (Applied Emphasis) Internship Permission Form Required

Sociology

SOC 100 - Sociological Concepts and Perspectives - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An examination of the theory, methods, and substance of sociology. The study of how societies are shaped, including economy, culture, socialization, deviance, stratification, and groups. The process of social change through social movements, industrialization, etc.

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 101 - Canadian Society - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A historical-sociological examination of the major institutions of Canadian society. Consideration is given to the diversity of Canadian regionalism and the dynamics of contemporary patterns of social change.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives)

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 102 - Social Problems - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An examination of social problems with particular emphasis upon their social construction; selected structural and behavioural problems (e.g., social inequality, intergroup relations, drug use, mental and physical disabilities); and social responses to social problems.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives)

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 204 - Aboriginal Societies in the Canadian Context - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A brief historical-sociological analysis of Aboriginal Societies in general and the context of the Nation State of Canada. Includes a sociological understanding of the impact of contemporary political, economic, and social structural changes in the developed nations on Aboriginal social values and norms, family structure and process, religion and spirituality, majority-minority sociopolitical relations, and social identity.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of SOC 204 (Aboriginal Societies in the Canadian Context) or SOC 104

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 210 - Introduction to Social Statistics - 3 (3-0-2)
Faculty of Arts

Statistical reasoning and techniques used by sociologists to summarize data and test hypotheses. Topics include describing distributions, cross-tabulations, scaling, probability, correlation and regression, and non-parametric tests.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of SOC 210 (Introduction to Social Statistics) or BUS 112 (Business Statistics) or MAT 151 (Introduction to Statistical Methods) or PSY 211 (Statistical Methods for Psychological Research)

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 224 - Sociology of Deviance and Conformity - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Processes involved in defining behaviour patterns as deviant; factors that influence conformity and change; examination of such behaviour patterns as sexuality, alcoholism, drug use, and selected mental and physical disabilities; public reaction to such behaviour.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 225 - Criminology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Examination and attempted explanation of crime and juvenile delinquency, with an analysis of the social processes leading to criminal behaviour.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 230 - Leisure, Sport and Society - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Leisure and sport in Canadian society are considered from a sociological perspective. Attention is directed to the interaction between sport and other institutions, as well as the social inequalities that impact collective leisure opportunities. Socialization, deviance, and the construction of social identity are considered in relation to leisure and sport participation.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 241 - Social Psychology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introduction to the study of individual and group behaviour observed in social processes.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of SOC 241 (Social Psychology) or PSY 241

Prerequisites: EDPS200 (Educational Psychology for Teaching) or PSY 105 (Individual and Social Behaviour) or SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 260 - Sociology of Inequality and Social Stratification - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course investigates the origins, nature, extent, determinants, persistence, and consequences of social inequality from cross-national and cross-temporal perspectives with an emphasis on Canadian society.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 261 - Social Organization - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Social systems, their components, interrelations, and the bases of social differentiation and integration. Overview of the dynamics of social organization in a variety of cultural settings; investigates the social building blocks of society. This course is intended as a base for more specialized courses in organizational behaviour, complex organizations, industrial sociology, etc.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 271 - The Family - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An introduction to the study of family relationships and their variant forms with focus on mate selection, couple, kin, age, and gender dynamics, family dissolution or reconstitution and change. A comparative approach with emphasis on families in Canada.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 301 - Gender Studies - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Gender roles and positions in society. The major sociological, socio-economic, and political theories which provide an analysis of gender roles.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 315 - Introduction to Social Methodology - 3 (3-0-2)
Faculty of Arts

Research design, data collection, and data processing strategies used by sociologists. Topics include research values and ethics, reliability and validity, experimentation, survey research techniques, participant observation, historical methodology, field research, and content analysis.

Prerequisites: MAT 151 (Introduction to Statistical Methods) or PSY 211 (Statistical Methods for Psychological Research) or SOC 210 (Introduction to Social Statistics) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 321 - Youth, Crime and Society - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the legal and social responses to youth in the Canadian criminal justice system. Included is a review of contemporary and historical explanations of youth crime, as well as emerging trends in the area of restorative justice.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and SOC 225 (Criminology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 327 - Criminal Justice Administration in Canada - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The evolution and evaluation of the theories of punishment; the law; the police and the courts; penal and reformatory institutions; probation and parole; experiments in reform and rehabilitation.

Prerequisites: SOC 225 (Criminology) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 332 - The Development of Sociology I - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the origin and development of classical sociological theory prior to the 1930s.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 333 - Development of Sociology II - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey of the contributions of modern and contemporary sociological theorists.

Prerequisites: SOC 332 (The Development of Sociology I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 344 - Mass Communication - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

An analysis of the varieties of mass media such as radio, television, film, books, and computers and their effect on popular culture and public opinion. Specific emphasis is given to Canadian society.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 352 - Population, Social and Economic Development - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Principles of growth and development in their historical context with regard to developed countries, such as Canada, and in their contemporary context with regard to underdeveloped countries. The interrelationships of economic, social and demographic variables in the process of development. Problems of urbanization and industrialization; factors influencing social change in the modern West or Asia or Latin America or Africa.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 353 - Urban Sociology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Social implications of urban life with respect to such topics as patterns of city growth; urban social organization (family, neighbourhood, community); urban social issues (housing, crime); and urban policy and urban planning (sociology of planning, citizen participation).

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 368 - Canadian Ethnic and Minority Relations - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Analysis of social processes leading to the development and understanding of minority status; case studies of ethnic and minority-group relations, with reference to cross-national studies.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 369 - Sociology of Globalization - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Critically examines the dynamics of globalization, variable impacts on global populations as well as alternative forms of international development theory and practice that consider global justice, environmental integrity and sustainability. Includes field visits.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 375 - Sociology of Aging - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Aging as a sociocultural phenomenon. Includes aging in relation to the self-concept, family, religion, politics, health, retirement and leisure, housing, and attitudes toward death, with particular emphasis on Canadian society.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 376 - Sociology of Religion - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Religious socialization, organization, and the interaction of religion and society are considered from the sociological perspective. Particular emphasis is placed on the sociological analysis of religion in Canadian society.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 377 - Sociology of Youth - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A study of adolescence in contemporary society, with special emphasis on Canadian youth. The impact on young people of changing family structures, gender roles, and social relations. Various forms of juvenile delinquency and their theoretical explanations are discussed.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 382 - Sociology of Health and Health Care - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The social psychology of health and illness, health promotion strategies, and the social organization of health care. Social, political, and economic forces influencing the development of health and health care policy in Canada are analyzed.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 405 - Special Topics in Sociology - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Review and discussion of special theoretical and methodological topics in contemporary sociology.

Prerequisites: SOC 315 (Introduction to Social Methodology) and SOC 332 (The Development of Sociology I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 471 - Sociological Analysis: The Family - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

The study of family relationships and their variant forms with focus on mate selection, couple, kin, age, and gender dynamics, family dissolution or reconstitution and change. Incorporates applied research into a specific topic, resulting in the writing of a major paper. A capstone course for four year Sociology majors open to others with prerequisites.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of SOC 471 (Sociological Analysis: The Family) or SOC 271 (The Family)

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and SOC 210 (Introduction to Social Statistics) and SOC 315 (Introduction to Social Methodology) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 475 - Sociological Analysis: Aging - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Agin as a socio-cultural phenomenon. Includes aging in relation to the self-concept, family, religion, politics, health, retirement and leisure, housing, attitudes toward death, with particular emphasis on Canadian society. Incorporates applied research into a specific topic, resulting in the writing of a major paper. A capstone course for four year Sociology majors; open to others with prerequisites.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of SOC 475 (Sociological Analysis: Aging) or SOC 375 (Sociology of Aging)

Prerequisites: SOC 100 (Sociological Concepts and Perspectives) and SOC 315 (Introduction to Social Methodology) and 2nd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

SOC 480 - Independent Study - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

In consultation with members of the Sociology Department, the student will undertake an independent study of an approved topic in Sociology. A student must first secure approval for their topic both from a supervising professor and the Department Chair before being permitted to register in this course.

Prerequisites: Sociology (12SR) and 3rd year standing required and Consent of Department

Further information: Course availability and times

Spanish

SPA 101 - Beginners' Spanish I - 3 (5-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students learn basic Spanish grammatical structures and a variety of practical vocabulary. They also learn about aspects of culture and society in the Modern Hispanic world. They acquire skills in oral comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.

Note: Not open to students with credit in Spanish 30. Students already fluent in Spanish will not be admitted, at the discretion of the instructor.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of SPA 101 (Beginners' Spanish I) or (30-level Spanish or equivalent)

Further information: Course availability and times

SPA 102 - Beginners' Spanish II - 3 (5-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

This course is designed to give students further intensive training in oral and written Spanish. It promotes a greater understanding of Hispanic culture and civilization.

Note: Not open to students with credit in Spanish 30. Students already fluent in Spanish will not be admitted, at the discretion of the instructor.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of SPA 102 (Beginners' Spanish II) or (30-level Spanish or equivalent)

Prerequisites: SPA 101 (Beginners' Spanish I) or special conditions as specified below

Further information: Course availability and times

Special Conditions: Spanish 20

SPA 211 - Intermediate Spanish I - 3 (0-5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students continue learning Intermediate Spanish grammar and a variety of practical vocabulary. Students will also learn about aspects of culture and society in the modern Hispanic world. They will acquire skills in oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students already fluent in Spanish could be admitted.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of SPA 211 (Intermediate Spanish I) or SPA 203

Prerequisites: (30-level Spanish or equivalent) or SPA 102 (Beginners' Spanish II) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

SPA 212 - Intermediate Spanish II - 3 (0-5L-0)
Faculty of Arts

Students continue learning Intermediate Spanish grammar and a variety of practical vocabulary. Students will also learn about aspects of culture and society in the modern Hispanic world. They will acquire skills in oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students already fluent in Spanish could be admitted.

Credit Restriction: Credit may be obtained for only one of SPA 212 (Intermediate Spanish II) or SPA 203

Prerequisites: SPA 211 (Intermediate Spanish I) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

University Foundations

UFDN 199 - University Foundations - 3 (3-0-0)
Faculty of Arts

A survey course designed to introduce students to post-secondary learning. Topics examined will include oral and written communication for academic purposes; critical thinking in a post-secondary setting; library and information systems for academic inquiry; multi-disciplinary learning in a post-secondary environment; and academic and career planning.

Further information: Course availability and times

Writing

WRI 300 - Essay Writing (Non-fiction) - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

A seminar on the principles and techniques of good expository writing, including the basic analysis essay, the comparative essay, and the research essay. Workshop format with regular discussion and analysis of students' and other writers' work.

Note: Open to first-year students.

Prerequisites: English (6)

Further information: Course availability and times

WRI 310 - Introduction to Creative Non-Fiction - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

An essay-writing seminar focusing on creative non-fiction, including memoirs, personal essays, and literary journalism. Students study professional examples of these forms of creative prose and the ways in which their authors employ literary devices such as authorial voice, characterization, dialogue, and expressive language. With the help of a workshop process, students will produce original literary essays.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

WRI 391 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introductory seminar in fiction writing. Includes a study of models of excellent writing, especially from the twentieth century, and discussion of students' own work, focusing on the techniques of fiction writing: plot, characterization, point of view, style, tone, and the role of the literary artist. Not a composition or remedial course.

Note: Students may be required to submit a portfolio of writing (about 10 pages) to the instructor at least one month before the course begins.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times

WRI 392 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry - 3 (0-3s-0)
Faculty of Arts

Introductory seminar in poetry writing. Through close study of a broad range of poetic forms - and through discussion of literary devices such as imagery, figurative language, rhyme, rhythm and metre - students will improve their understanding of the art and craft of poetry writing. By the end of the course, students will have written and revised a portfolio of poems.

Note: Students may be required to submit a portfolio of writing (about 10 poems) to the instructor at least one month before the course begins.

Prerequisites: English (6) and 2nd year standing required

Further information: Course availability and times